Geography 400 Blog
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Geography 400 Blog
Geography, History, Economics, World
Curated by Derek Ethier
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Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is amazing how valuable land is across the globe. Countries rush and battle for submerged areas of land that have yet to reach sea level. The benefits to claiming these lands, however, are endless. Perhaps the nation can sell the real estate to speculators who could build luxury homes. Maybe the island will be rich in natural resorces ripe for plunder. Plus, the ownership of a 200 nautical mile radius is not bad either. In a world where untapped resources and unexplored land is no longer plentiful, islands like these provide endless opportunities.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:29 PM

The EEZ policy that exist has made every space up for contentious conflict. The miles off the coast of Surtsey and other small islands have become valuable because of EEZ and conflict exist over islands that are uninhabited and useless. Economic geography can influence political geography when it comes to these small island and their exclusive economic zone.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 2015 10:46 AM

You have to be joking with me!!!!!!!!

 

Claims for a volcanic-induced mass of land?  In this day and age, one would hope that something like this would not lead to a long and drawn-out dispute.  There is much more pertinent issues present in this world.


 How about this for an idea?  Let's leave the "island" neutral and allow it it to be used as a temporary destination for whomever visits it.  It should be protected and preserved by everyone interested but not so much that visitors cannot temporarily explore and enjoy the island.  

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A Burmese spring?

A Burmese spring? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

In Burma, and other nations throughout Southeast Asia, authoritarian regimes backed by China run rampant. The Chinese governments allows these authoritarian regimes to exist because they serve China's own interest. This new sort of neocolonialism almost mirrors the policies practiced by the Untied States in the Western Hemisphere during the late 19th and early 20th century. It is encouraging to see that signs of basic human rights do appear to be on their way however. With the former resistance leader meeting with figures from national and international governments is a good start. 


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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:10 PM

This is interesting and hopefully turns out to be a good thing for Myanmar.  After being under so much oppression from not only its own government but from other countries as well.  Having this improved more relaxed government that works more for the people is a definite improvement for Myanmar.  Standing up to China about closing the dam because the people that live in Myanmar aren't benefiting from it and are still poor.  Stepping up and listening to the people that live in the country and standing up to others that are taking advantage of the country is a huge step in the right direction on improving the lives of those in the country.

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is very uncommon for a nation with so many different ethnic groups to be so divided. The dividing factor in this case is Islam, pulling together people from different homelands. I think the most amazing part about this article is that Pakistanis allowed their country to be named by Western students from Cambridge. I believe that a name with deeper historical roots tied to their Islamic faith would have been more appropriate. Either way, this relatively new nation with its booming new capital of Islamabad is much more united than nations, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, with this many ethnic groups.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
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God Grew Tired of Us

God Grew Tired of Us | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

In the 1980s, Sudan and South Sudan waged a terrible war based solely on religion. It's terrible that over 25,000 boys in South Sudan had to flee for their lives in fear that they would be murdered just because they were Catholic. The three young boys had to travel thousands of miles to flee to Ethiopia to avoid persecution and eminent death. By escaping their country, they also escaped bomb raids, dehydration, starvation and genocide. Eventually, these boys manage to make it to America, surviving their valiant journey.


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Tsunami of Change Hitting Burma!

The news that the Burmese have had their most fair elections since the era shortly after independence is very encouraging. Burma must work to remove the title of Myannmar which represents an authoritive reign that denied citizens basic human rights. With the news that this once political refugee's democratic party won every seat but two in Parliament, Burma finally becomes relevant on the world stage. With an era of democracy looming, this country can finally look forward to a potential bright future.


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James Hobson's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:36 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 2)

The oppressive government of Myanmar (aka Burma) may finally be realizing that they are in a sense their own enemy. Since free elections seem to have taken place (and apparently were not 'faked' like other reforming nations have done), it seems as if the government of the time is admitting a type of defeat by showing that more citizens are against it than for it. This also implies that despite giving up political power, those previously in charge of the government see potentially better lives for themselves by not being the only ones in control. If this holds true, then it can serve as a powerful example to oppressive governments that in order to fulfill your own best interests, you have to let others vie for their own. This can also serve as an argument for pro-Democratic activists.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:19 PM

Burma is an area where the identity of the people has been muddled. This is an election that signals the people of Burma acting to clarify their needs through free and fair elections. Democracy is a powerful tool in regards to expressing the voices of the people. Aung San Suu Kyi is now the face of that voice.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:37 PM

This video explains that today the nation of Burma is at the cusp of change. This nation long oppressed by its government now stands to usher in a system of democracy and bring with it a hope of improving the lives of it's citizens. Sadly uplifting events are far and few between today but also long as people such as this aspire to bring change and better things for themselves and their families change can happen. Hopefully the people actually are able to achieve this level of freedom they seek and won't simply end up with a new brand of oppression.  

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Protests, Self-Immolation Signs Of A Desperate Tibet : NPR

Chinese renewed efforts to crack down on Tibet, refusing to give them basic freedoms only worsens the cause. Tibetans will only fight harder as more and more of their rights are taken away by the Chinese. These beliefs are deeply entrenched in the religion of the Tibetans who offer their lives as signs of protest. Self-immolation is not a new practice, but goes back years and years with other very famous instances such as Thich Quan Duc's display in protest of the Vietnam War. While not so logical, this practice is a very strong symbol that oppressed people can only take so much subjection.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 1:39 PM

China has tightened their security around the Tibetan monestary and the monasteries seem to be emptying out. Monks have been setting themselves on fire in protest against Chinese repression. This is a sign of desperation from the monks.  

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:52 PM

(East Asia topic 5)

What I gather from this video is that China sees all political resistance as being specifically aimed at its own demise, but I believe this to be false. Rather, it seems in this sense that the country's judgment has gone blind in a power rage. Never will an entire country agree on everything (or even one thing for that matter). This resistance seems to stem from diversity and the desire to maintain it, and examining historical geography proves diversity to in fact be a desirable trait and major strength. Just as the famous 13-sectioned snake cartoon from the American colonies shows, success lies in diversity. "You can't have cities without farms to feed them." I mention phrases such as this because they show the yin-yang struggle for equality and balance for greater good, which  hopefully China (especially since it is an Oriental concept and symbol) will learn from and apply in its policies towards minority groups within its borders.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:47 PM

China's efforts to control an area that identifies itself as a separate entity from China has been met with some extreme examples of protests. Dozens have monks have committed suicide to protest China's forced control over Tibet. Although this is causing international support from the US and others it seems like China will not change its ways. Another thing to keep in mind is China's position in the UN. As a permanent member of the security council China has the right to veto an UN resolution that could address the issues in Tibet.

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

India-Pakistani conflicts have deep rooted causes that go as far back as colonialism. British India was a largely Hindu nation, but also had a large minority Muslim population. Following the decolonization of the colony, different leaders held different ideals on how the nation should be controlled. Many Hindu leaders called for an Indian state for Hindus only. As a result, the former British colony fragmented into several nations. While India was formed, so were the Islamic nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. Hostile neighbors always result in border wars and this is just another example of this. As people with different cultural and religious ideologies clash, it is impossible to tell how gruesome the outcome. In fact, I recently read that in 1947 after decolonization, as many as 1 million were killed in clashes between Hindus and Muslims.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:07 PM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:41 PM

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.