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Geography, History, Economics, World
Curated by Derek Ethier
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Rise of solar panel energy in Bangladesh

The use of solar panel energy in Bangladesh is an example of using good green energy in a developing country. It is ridiculous to conceive Bangaldesh would build power plants, but solar energy is in abundance in Bangaldesh. It is important that we take new initiatives to alternate energy sources to creater a greener and more sustainable planet. Even developed nations like the United States could take lessons from Bangadesh.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:32 AM

The fact that a Nation like Bangladesh which has such a high population and with it a high poverty rate is is turning to renewable energy is fantastic. While the production and implementation of these panels will be costly initially over time they will pay for themselves. To transport and distribute other forms of energy to so many people is not only logistically a nightmare but also incredibly expensive. By using solar energy their is a far greater chance a wider audience of people will have access to power. 

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:26 AM

I believe solar energy will help improve living in places such as Bangladesh. With solar energy, it can provide light at night, store food, and help to produce and cook food. Telecommunications would also be easier to access.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:28 PM

Because of the rise in solar power energy it is allowing what I would consider a dark country is so important is because it is allowing the people of the area to have a longer day. Most people would be at home in the dark but with this cheap and affordable government funded solar panel they are able to have a longer day and seem to be able to be healthier lifestyle as they are not left out in the dark and able to go to a pharmacy at all times. These solar panels can run up to two light bulbs for ten hours allowing life to continue whether its dark or not.

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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is very uncommon for a nation with so many different ethnic groups to be so divided. The dividing factor in this case is Islam, pulling together people from different homelands. I think the most amazing part about this article is that Pakistanis allowed their country to be named by Western students from Cambridge. I believe that a name with deeper historical roots tied to their Islamic faith would have been more appropriate. Either way, this relatively new nation with its booming new capital of Islamabad is much more united than nations, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, with this many ethnic groups.


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
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South Asian floods take economic toll

Seasonal monsoons have devastationg effects across South Asia. While these rainstorms are essential for growing rice, they also have very negative effects as well. Damage to homes, crops and infrastructure as well as disease, malnutrition and death come in masses due to these storms. In countries like Nepal and Bangladesh at the foothills of the Himalayas, the steep slope leads to fast erosion and all fertile soil is deposited downriver. Half the farmland has been abandoned due to this accompanied with high flooding.

 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:41 PM
The people that live here understand that they will have flooding every year. They're smart to build elevated roads so they have some way of transportation over flooded areas. It's weird to think that this is a normal thing for them and for us we close everything down and wait in our houses.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:17 AM
In an area already stricken with poverty, the floods manifest the problems. High rains and low elevations cause massive floods in areas such as Bangladesh and Nepal. Most areas do not receive aid, especially the remote areas of the villages.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 4:55 PM

The "socio-economics of flooding" is a side of the natural disaster we don't normally think about. People most affected by floods tend to live in areas with poor infrastructure and large populations. Their displacement to cities, like Dhaka, has incredible cost. For both the family and the new place they relocate to. 

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

Following its decolonization, India has become a major spot were outsourcing of the telecommunications business has become common. An emerging middle class has managed to throw off many of the ancient yokes of Hinduism and caste beliefs. Many middle class Indians have access to the internet, computers and cell phones. However, the government has had a hard time keeping up with the nation's booming population. Poor sanitation and lack of things as simple as toilets have become serious problems in this industrializing nation.


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Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:39 PM

This is really sad, because people should be able to have access to toilets and clean drinking water in their own homes. I hope that the government takes this problem seriously, and makes a lot of sanitation improvements in these poor areas.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:18 PM

With the lack of toilets and the uprising in the use of cell phones in India, the sanitation and living standards of the people of the country are lacking which in turn comes to a place of hazard. With more people moving into the country and from other areas it is causing a massive uprise in the use of technology but government funding and jobs do not create enough money to continuously keep up with the upgrades needed in sanitation and public safety.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:27 PM

there is a constantly recurring theme here, mass population growth and the government of said country not being able to grow at the same rate to provide simple services to its people

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History of the India-Pakistan Border

History of the India-Pakistan Border | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

India-Pakistani conflicts have deep rooted causes that go as far back as colonialism. British India was a largely Hindu nation, but also had a large minority Muslim population. Following the decolonization of the colony, different leaders held different ideals on how the nation should be controlled. Many Hindu leaders called for an Indian state for Hindus only. As a result, the former British colony fragmented into several nations. While India was formed, so were the Islamic nations of Pakistan and Bangladesh. Hostile neighbors always result in border wars and this is just another example of this. As people with different cultural and religious ideologies clash, it is impossible to tell how gruesome the outcome. In fact, I recently read that in 1947 after decolonization, as many as 1 million were killed in clashes between Hindus and Muslims.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:07 PM

This article chonicles the history of the conflict between India and Pakistan, focusing on the disputed Kashmir region. The violence over the border is spurred by religion and political issues. But with India increasingly becoming bigger in a global scale what does that mean for this conflict with Pakistani? 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 12, 2013 7:41 PM

Colonialism rears its ugly head again, this time not in Africa but in India/Pakistan..but with the same result.  Borders drawn arbitrarily did not work in Africa, nor did it work in India.  It just casues the people there to try and work out and fix problems that the former colonial rulers casued.  They tried here to do it so that there was a land for the Muslim population to have a nation on the subcontinent and not subject to Hindu majority rule.  However Britain never looked at what would happen with a area that had a Hindu leader with a Muslim population.  He wanted to be independant, but the Muslim population wanted to go to Pakistan, so he went to India for help...sound confusing..it is..much like the Northern Ireland/UK/Republic of Ireland debate..there is no easy answer and it looks like we have to try to fix colonialism's problems again.