Geography 400 Blog
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Geography 400 Blog
Geography, History, Economics, World
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Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is amazing how valuable land is across the globe. Countries rush and battle for submerged areas of land that have yet to reach sea level. The benefits to claiming these lands, however, are endless. Perhaps the nation can sell the real estate to speculators who could build luxury homes. Maybe the island will be rich in natural resorces ripe for plunder. Plus, the ownership of a 200 nautical mile radius is not bad either. In a world where untapped resources and unexplored land is no longer plentiful, islands like these provide endless opportunities.


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:29 PM

The EEZ policy that exist has made every space up for contentious conflict. The miles off the coast of Surtsey and other small islands have become valuable because of EEZ and conflict exist over islands that are uninhabited and useless. Economic geography can influence political geography when it comes to these small island and their exclusive economic zone.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 12, 2015 10:46 AM

You have to be joking with me!!!!!!!!

 

Claims for a volcanic-induced mass of land?  In this day and age, one would hope that something like this would not lead to a long and drawn-out dispute.  There is much more pertinent issues present in this world.


 How about this for an idea?  Let's leave the "island" neutral and allow it it to be used as a temporary destination for whomever visits it.  It should be protected and preserved by everyone interested but not so much that visitors cannot temporarily explore and enjoy the island.  

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Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed?

Finding the flotsam: where is Japan's floating tsunami wreckage headed? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

This model shows how interconnected the world is now. Acid raid caused by factories in Michigan used to land in Canadian lakes, ruining the ecosystem. Today, debris from Asia washes ashore on America's West coast, dirtying its beautfiful beaches and likely harming its ecosystem as well. It is unreal to think that over 900,000 metric tons of debris is floating throughout the vast Pacific as a result of the 2011 tsunami. I would guess that in island nations throughout the Pacific, massive amounts of debris have washed ashore. This is an unintended consquence of globalization and urbanization. Weather phenomenons and mother nature are unpredictable and also very deadly.


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 6:09 PM

Hopefully none of the wreckage that reaches the US is radioactive.... But the projected travel of the debris shows how ocean currents create, almost, a "natural" globalization of natural disasters. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:43 AM

Although it's important to know where all of this trash is headed, this just makes me think of how we might prevent this. We can't prevent these catastrophic natural disasters, but how might we lessen it's effects on our cities and settlements? Furthermore, how might we lessen our impact on ecosystems during these times of catastrophe? 

It's only called a catastrophe when it hits human populations for a reason, it's not just devastating to us. Remnants of our lifestyle are carried far and wide, able to cause harm on many other species. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:37 PM

An example of how even without considering globalization the world is interconnected. The debris from the 2011 tsunami was never disposed of effectively and the United States may be effected more than they ever expected. If this pile of debris reaches US shores it will make many Americans consider how a tsunami across the globe will eventually hurt them at home. 

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Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors

Penguins from Space: A New Satellite Census Doubles the Known Population of Emperors | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

Geospatial technology has allowed scientists to accurately measure Antarctica's Emperor Penguin population for the first time. The results blew their minds as they accounted for 595,000 penguins in over 46 herds. This is far more than they believed existed after conducting previous studies. This just goes to show just how a lack of human presence allows a species to grow and flourish. The vast ice sheets of Anarctica allow these penguins to grow at astronimical rates. However, with these polar ice sheets gradually melting, these penguins may be in danger very soon. Scientists will have to monitor the situation closely.


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:48 AM

In the beginning of the semester we talked about how geography is always changing. Our understanding of geography does as well. This new technology helps people have a clearer picture of the wildlife that exists on Antarctica. Because of its harsh environment the amount we know about this barren continent has been limited. As technology improves we will be able to gain more accurate information about Antarctica.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 12:58 PM

Using this new technology, animal can be monitored and helped by the satellites. Having a way to accurately know the population of a species is incredible,  because now we can know which species are in danger of extinction and we can take steps to help them. Before the use of the satellite,  the population of Emperor penguins was found to be 595, 000 and the colonies of penguins was found to be 46 instead of the previous 38, so without this technology there have been penguins that may have needed help, but now they will get proper attention.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:27 PM

Technology never ceases to amaze me. As the article described, the use of satellite imagining recently showed that the “population count” of the emperor penguin is “found nearly twice as many...as did previous studies.” Prior to the use of satellite imaging, the method to obtain this type of data was done by people actually being around the area. As the new numbers showed this was inaccurate because so much of the artic can’t be reached by the human population. I think this brings up an interesting notion. We define our landscape based on what we see. Yet, what we see doesn’t always capture what is actually on earth. As such, I wonder if more penguin colonies have disappeared then the one the British intuition noticed. We won’t know, but at least now thanks to technology a better grasp of the situation can happen. Maybe with more concrete data about the effects of global warming on Antarctic more non-believers could be swayed. All in all, I think the technology is beneficial. The only down side about this technology is the possibility for misuse. If we can now figure out the penguin population down to which ones are adults, imagine just what else this technology can due in the name of “geographic research.”      

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

This carpet shark has to be one of the most incredible creatures I have ever seen. It shows just how great the biodiversity is in areas mostly untouched by civilization. The Great Barrier Reef, though very delicate, has a variety of species found nowhere else in the world. This shark appears to be perfectly adapted to its environment because not only does it literally blend in with the ocean floor, but if it can swallow other sharks whole, it must be the king of the ocean. It is very sad to think of how many species once existed on our planet. In the Amazon, we wipe out species before they are even discovered. Let us hope that the South Pacific does not suffer the same fate.


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Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:38 AM

This article reminds me of another video i've seen recently of a grouper fish swallowing a 4-foot black tip shark whole. A fisherman caught that on camera while trying to reel in the shark. Time and time again I'm reminded that not everything in nature is as it seems and that the unexpected should be expected. 

This makes me want to buy some scuba gear and take some diving classes, I ought to conquer my fear of sharks by safely observing them with a research team! 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:36 PM

Amazing photos, there are so many different kinds of life that exists in the Ocean. As the Great Barrier Reef falls victim to climate change and pollution, the number of species at risk is almost calculable. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:26 PM

Australia's marine life is amazing, being able to hide by blending in to their environment is a testament to the waters that Australia has. The diverse wildlife of Australia waters is shown to be an adaptive bunch and begs the question: How many more animals are out there that we do not know of?

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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

  These five men very literally went on the adventure of their lives. While watching this video and seeing them experience so many fun and interesting things, I wonder whether or not they would wish to return to their old lives. And if they did, would they miss America? When they returned home, they did not adorn the traditional dress, but instead wore Western style suits in front of their kin. This video shows that although globalization is occurring very rapidly, there are still societies nearly untouched by "civilization." The South Pacific is one of the last "Garden of Eden" type places left in the world, and we must be careful not to destroy it.


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:14 PM

This reminds me of what we learned in class about American people or white folks in general go to a native island and want to see the natives uncivilized and not up with the times of technology, clothes, homes made of up to date material. They want to see grass skirts, old tools, tribal living. The white folks see modern times already they want to see old things.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:19 PM

I think exercises like this are really cool, there are a lot of these experiments that go on with culture swaps and I always find the reactions when returning home to be probably the most interesting, just like in this video it is a large celebrations and it helps to put things in perspective

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:42 PM

This is a show that is based on how we see and view daily life of native people as compared to our own. How ever I feel as though this show is more based on the how these people actually live rather then adapting and learning to the area that they are in. It does show how globalization plays an important role in the show.