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How did Pakistan get it's name?

How did Pakistan get it's name? | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it

It is very uncommon for a nation with so many different ethnic groups to be so divided. The dividing factor in this case is Islam, pulling together people from different homelands. I think the most amazing part about this article is that Pakistanis allowed their country to be named by Western students from Cambridge. I believe that a name with deeper historical roots tied to their Islamic faith would have been more appropriate. Either way, this relatively new nation with its booming new capital of Islamabad is much more united than nations, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, with this many ethnic groups.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 19, 2013 2:27 PM

When you take in the way that the British Empire controlled many colonies and tried to spread their culture to such diverse regions, it is no suprise that Pakistan was named essentially by a game of Scrabble.  I suppose the naming is somewhat creative and certainly unique compared to how other countries get their names, yet just picturing a group of colleagues naming a country is strange.  Though the U.K. did grant them independance, how independant were they really if they weren't even given the right to name their own land.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 11, 12:55 PM

(South Asia topic 5)

The name "Pakistan" can be thought of as more of a "Mexicali" or "Calexico" than an "Afghanistan" or "Turkmenistan." In other words, it is an acronym, which I was surprised to learn. Though is can also be translated as "land of the Paks", there is no specific group by that name. Relating back to a previous Scoop, this shows the importance of validation and reasoning, as opposed to 'blind belief.'

I think the use of an acronym for the new nation's name (a toponym) was a very intuitive option to choose; no ethnic group could complain that their name didn't make it into the name of their nation while others' did. This seems to be a form of equal representation.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 1:28 AM

This article is very interesting as it explains the origin of the name Pakistan. Like many people I assumed that the name had to do with some old ethnic group but in reality its something of an acronym. Interestingly enough Pakistan is incredibly diverse and really only held together by the common Islamic religion. Names which are acronyms are more common place in government plans or cheesy infomercial products rather than the names of countries.     

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Geography 400 Blog | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

It is unfortunate that Europeans and Muslims cannot manage to coexist without problems. It some cases, like the banning of the hijab in France, Europe fails to accept that Muslims wish to retain some of their cultural identity. People should be free to wear whatever they want in public. However, to play the devil's advocate, this is an example of undermining French culture. The French government likely fears that they will lose a France that is "French." As more and more Muslims come into Europe, Europeans likely will have to make concessions and be more tolerant. However, it is the job of Muslims to pay respect to the country they are living in, practicing certain customs when necessary.


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Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 12:29 PM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 1:18 PM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:59 PM

The Muslim community was never really accepted in Europe looking back in history. Now more and emigrating and in mass numbers in certain areas.  While the European Union is a stronghold keeping Europe together, the argument can be made that the countries are falling apart in terms of identity, economy and production. A new wave of immigrants will not help increase their national identity and strength.