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Penguins from Space: New Technology can aid in the Prevention of Extinction

Penguins from Space: New Technology can aid in the Prevention of Extinction | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

High-resolution imaging has allowed scientists to produce the first full count of Antarctica's emperor penguins...

 

Before this, there was no way to to gather reliable penguin statistics.  Geospatial technologies are now providing us the tools to teach us more about the biogeography of penguins.  The applications of geospatial technologies are endless.

 

Modern technology is helping scientists have a better understanding of certain animals and how they adapt to climate. Scientists are using VHR satellite images to study emperor penguins in Antarctica. This technique allows for a more accurate population count and scientists can monitor population patterns.  With this less expensive and more efficient technique, scientists are able to have a better understanding of the species and changes that may affect the animal.  The VHR satellite technique is helping biologists and ecologists study other animals as well, such as, the seal population.  These studies help reveal how variations in climate may affect a given animal.  This technique will help scientists monitor population patterns.  If scientists see populations decline, they can then look into solutions to prevent extinction.  Elizabeth Allen

  


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:48 AM

In the beginning of the semester we talked about how geography is always changing. Our understanding of geography does as well. This new technology helps people have a clearer picture of the wildlife that exists on Antarctica. Because of its harsh environment the amount we know about this barren continent has been limited. As technology improves we will be able to gain more accurate information about Antarctica.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 12:58 PM

Using this new technology, animal can be monitored and helped by the satellites. Having a way to accurately know the population of a species is incredible,  because now we can know which species are in danger of extinction and we can take steps to help them. Before the use of the satellite,  the population of Emperor penguins was found to be 595, 000 and the colonies of penguins was found to be 46 instead of the previous 38, so without this technology there have been penguins that may have needed help, but now they will get proper attention.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:27 PM

Technology never ceases to amaze me. As the article described, the use of satellite imagining recently showed that the “population count” of the emperor penguin is “found nearly twice as many...as did previous studies.” Prior to the use of satellite imaging, the method to obtain this type of data was done by people actually being around the area. As the new numbers showed this was inaccurate because so much of the artic can’t be reached by the human population. I think this brings up an interesting notion. We define our landscape based on what we see. Yet, what we see doesn’t always capture what is actually on earth. As such, I wonder if more penguin colonies have disappeared then the one the British intuition noticed. We won’t know, but at least now thanks to technology a better grasp of the situation can happen. Maybe with more concrete data about the effects of global warming on Antarctic more non-believers could be swayed. All in all, I think the technology is beneficial. The only down side about this technology is the possibility for misuse. If we can now figure out the penguin population down to which ones are adults, imagine just what else this technology can due in the name of “geographic research.”      

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It's Okay to go Green During the Holidays, Look at the Grinch!

It's Okay to go Green During the Holidays, Look at the Grinch! | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
10 ways to go green this holiday season. Zero Waste holiday tips from Eco-Cycle.

 

This infographic combined with these recommendations are some simple reminders that mass consumption and waste does not contribute to global joy or cheer. 

 

There have been major differences between American's food consumption compared to Africa's consumption for as long as I can remember. Here we are many years later and the devastation continues.... Comparing articles http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/interactive/2012/jul/19/sahel-food-crisis-guardian-interactive and http://ecocycle.org/holidayguide/10ways    ; Elizabeth Allen


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Mary Rack's comment, November 25, 2012 8:10 PM
I shared this on Facebook and Google+. Hope for lots of readers and followers!
Seth Dixon's comment, November 25, 2012 8:36 PM
Thanks Mary!
Javier Curso CFIE's curator insight, April 8, 2013 7:37 AM

beautiful, as Susan

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Perpetual Ocean by NASA

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio — the same team that recently brought us an animation of the moon as it will appear from Earth for each hour of 2012 — has also released a stunning video called “Perpetual Ocean,” a time lapse of the world’s ocean currents as calculated by the ECCO2 computational model.

 

This is an stunning visualization of ocean currents.  Thanks for the suggestion! 

 

Neat video. I just did a small art project which involved a globe and referred to Van Gogh's Starry Night. As other posters mentioned- this video is similar to Van Gogh's painting.   Elizabeth Allen


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Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:10 PM

This video is pretty awesome! I love how it shows the different ways that the currents move around the continents and in mid ocean. How are we not to expect for natural phenomenoms to be unpredictable when our oceansa re the same. i would have never expected to see so many idfferent flows and currents but they do exist. It gives you a look into how are planet works and also gives you a chilling thought of how easily a ship would get lost in deep ocean waters. - M. Carvajal

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:39 PM

This is an amazing video. The technology we have at our disposable is truly remarkable and we have reached a point where mapping all the currents of the ocean can be done and put up on youtube. This information is available to people who otherwise would have no idea how to interpret ocean currents.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 16, 2014 10:18 AM

This video shows just how technology is advancing, being able to show how the world's water currents move and, especially, showing how different our bodies of water are. I always thought the currents were somehow connected, but now I see that many move in their own way.

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National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com

National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

Imagine, if everyone in the world wanted to join together for a party, they could all come to RI. Yes everyone on earth could fit in RI(1500 sq. ft. miles). All 7 Billion of us.  Elizabeth Allen

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Brazil's economy overtakes UK's

Brazil's economy overtakes UK's | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Brazil has overtaken the UK as the world's sixth largest economy, the Centre for Economics and Business Research says.

 

The "BRIC" countries are surging forward and are seen as major players in the global economy (Brazil, Russia, India and China). Brazil just recently past the U.K. as the 6th largest economy.  China passed Japan not more than a year ago.    Furthermore, Russia and India are poised to pass the traditional European economic powers (U.K., Germany, France and Italy) by 2020.  In this restructuring of the global economy, what will the impacts be on various regions of the world? 

 

The statistics prove that Brazil is higher ranking economically that the UK. Brazil is succeeding economically. It must have to with their natural resources and financial gains of exporting goods.  Brazil is economically expanding.  Elizabeth Allen


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Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 2014 11:46 AM

BRIC has always interested me as an alternative to the traditional centers of economic power. The four BRIC countries are all powerful up and comers and their positioning all around the world and lack of cultural commonality make them a very intriguing force.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:55 AM

The rise of the BRIC countries shows that the global economy is changing due to globalization. Now that transportation is cheaper, communication is more fluid, and economies can intermingle easier than before, countries can be more competitive with previous economic powers. I find it interesting that it is likely that in the next century we will see the US slipping further down this list.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 8:01 AM

While this may seem surprising, this event should not be taken as such. Countries such as China, Russia, India and Brazil are becoming more powerful with the passing of each day. The biggest challenges to the United States are China and Russia. They are the only nations who can compete with us on both a political and economic scale. Russia is currently causing the most issues. Putin is an agitator on the world stage. I truly believe that it is his desire to recreate the great Russian Empire of old. His continued medaling around the globe will be a serious threat for the foreseeable future. China is the longer term threat. They are the only ones who possess the economic abilities to compete with us. Brazil and India, while growing are still not any were near us in terms of political or economic strength. Our government should do all it can, to foster good relationships with these nations. Especially sense are relationships with China and Russia are problematic at the moment.

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I'd like to buy the World a Coke, I mean pop; no, I mean soda!

I'd like to buy the World a Coke, I mean pop; no, I mean soda! | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic that is going viral on Facebook right now, so I thought it would be time to link you to the original.  This map isn't just cool, but a great portal to a discussion on regions, diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  

 

 

Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.   Elizabeth Allen

 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 9, 2014 11:44 PM

Unit 1

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A Life Revealed

A Life Revealed | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Seventeen years after she stared out from the cover of National Geographic, a former Afghan refugee comes face-to-face with the world once more.

 

The original cover is one of the more famous National Geographic photos of all time, and yet the woman in the photograph has not lived a life as though millions of people could recognize her eyes.  This is her story. 

 

This certainly is a life revealed. Between the pictures and the years you can get a sense of what her life was like and what it lacked. An affectuous story, it is always amazing to see proof of history's changes. And how a picture can tell a thousand words.  Not only has Sharbat Gula's skin withered, but so has her soul.   Elizabeth Allen


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 1:58 PM

You can see in this woman's face that the years have been hard for her living as refugee. Although this seems like National Geographic giving themselves a pat on the back it is important to remember that this women became a national symbol for refugees and yet her life did not improve and furthermore she had no idea that her picture was so well known.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:36 PM

I never would have imagined the "Afghan girl" being alive. It's amazing how National Geographic was able to catch up and speak with her and photograph her. This demonstrates the pure professionalism and global outreach national geographic has. 

One of the things I am most thankful about is that I do not live in a war torn society. Being separated from my family, forced to flee and become a refugee is a horrid way of life that I know I would struggle to endure. Some Afghanistan people have been doing this for over twenty years. 

One time I was having a discussion with my friend. We talking about America and the westernized part of the world. He and I agreed how lucky we were to be born in America. We were born white males in the United States of America. We could have been born a woman living in Iran or Iraq, or even as a little rural Afghan boy whom would eventually be taken and abused by theTaliban. We kept going on with different scenarios and different countries. 

Want I want for people to realize is how advanced the United States of America is. Yes, we have our problems... but non comparable to other nations. Look at nations such as Afghanistan, Iraq, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. These are first world nations which have war torn regions occupied by terrorists of all sorts. They also have little to no functioning government, although Afghanistan is improving. Even second world nations, although developing at a steady pace are plagued with an exponential amount of violent crimes and corruption. South Africa would be a prime example. 

Its amazing to read about the "Afghan girl"(s) or better yet Sharbat Gula. After all she has gone through she still has hope for her younger children. After enduring such a life of foul experiences she is still able to place all her faith into Allah and hope for the best for her children. It is also neat to see her place such a high level of importance on education. Education is the foundation for all development. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 20, 2015 6:58 AM

These two images are rather striking. They depict seventeen years in the life a young female Afghani refuge. They depict seventeen years of hell. The woman in this photograph has lived a hard life. Seventeen years probably feels like fifty years to her. On her face, you see the effects of living a life as a refugee. A life of not having a true home or place that you can count on. A life of living in deplorable refugee camps. It is the shame of the world, that people are forced to live like this. Unfortunately this women's story is an all to common occurrence in Afghanistan. Thousands have suffered similar fates in refugee camps. We must never forget the suffering of these people.

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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?

 

What a difference between luxury and necessity. Yes, everyone feels that cellphones are a necessity. However, in a region that lacks working sanitation and plumbing, cellphones are a luxury. Clearly India is in desperate need of "the basics". With its never-ending growing population, the statisitcs of people lacking proper plumbing will surely rise. It is sad to think of a country where over 60% are without what we take for granted.   Elizabeth Allen


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:18 PM

With the lack of toilets and the uprising in the use of cell phones in India, the sanitation and living standards of the people of the country are lacking which in turn comes to a place of hazard. With more people moving into the country and from other areas it is causing a massive uprise in the use of technology but government funding and jobs do not create enough money to continuously keep up with the upgrades needed in sanitation and public safety.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:27 PM

there is a constantly recurring theme here, mass population growth and the government of said country not being able to grow at the same rate to provide simple services to its people

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Piracy Backlash

Piracy Backlash | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Abshir Boyah, a pirate who says he has hijacked more than 25 ships off the coast of Somalia, says he will give up this career if certain terms are met.

 

What economic, cultural and political circumstances in the 21st century would allow for piracy to exist?  What are the impacts of piracy on Somalia?  

 

The concept of piracy is a scary one. Their illegal ways cause corruption throughout their society. However, it seems as if they do not have much choice. Yes, it is morally wrong, but look at the money they are making. The prirates are willing to cease illegal activity if their demands are met. Their demands are not out of the ordinary-- they want their oceans protected from toxic waste, job creations, and a fair government. Somalia has a long road ahead of them to acheive any sort of unity.  Elizabeth Allen


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:25 PM

Somalia's pirates are notorious worldwide, and while the pirates may be committing horrible crimes, it is important to understand why these people have turned to illegal means to survive. The economic state of Somalia is rather grim. Considered a textbook "failed state", men for the most part have to choose between working as a fishermen or turning to piracy. Since fishermen barely scrape a living from the waters, Somalian men turn to piracy. With no other economic opportunities, it is often seen as the only choice. Many Somali pirates openly admit that if they had other options, they would absolutely change occupations. 

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:17 PM

The media oftentimes demonizes specific groups of people. So I was presently surpassed that the NYT’s investigated the human aspect of desperation. Many of these Somalians are hopeless and the economic burden on their shoulders drives them to act unethical. When you first priority is survival, courteousness and moral laws often don’t apply. Nevertheless, it was cool to hear about these human stories.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:37 PM

Just like the pirates of the late 17th and early 18th centuries, these folks bring all the vices of the originals except perhaps without much of the romanticism that comes with the elders. Though perhaps in two hundred years someone will make a movie titled Pirates of the Somalia featuring Johnny Depp's great-great-great grandson. 

 

It's understandable why these people want to get out of the business. Despite the sex and wealth they've gotten, it's not exactly stable employment. Nor is it as safe as sitting at a desk or being a plumber. But when your society simply doesn't support these industries, then the people are left to resort to more drastic measures.

 

It's also interesting to see the quazi-government stepping in to try and combat it. Traditional Muslim values are the reason for them wanting and end to it. It's understandable to not want children to look up to pirates and the life of crime they lead. But in order for the practice to stop, the pirates want international environmental protections, aid, and government support. Should the international community give into piracy or should it be removed by force?

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Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Read Religious architecture of Islam for travel tips, advice, news and articles from all around the world by Lonely Planet...

 

This is an excellent article that can be used in a thematic class for analyzing religion, the human landscape, the urban environment and cultural iconography.  For a regional geography class, this show great images from Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria and Israel/Palestine.  

 

These mosques are breathtaking. They also have distinct historical factors, such as, the Temple Mount being built over the rock that Mohammed rose to heaven. When we look at the dome we are inclined to notice the historical aspects and their meanings.  Elizabeth Allen


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Lily and Cami's curator insight, November 5, 2014 5:18 PM

Israel Religion: I scooped this because the picture really stood out to me because the golden dome stands over the rock on Temple Mount. you also can see great images of Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria, and Israel/Palestine. Not only are these sacred buildings but they are also big religious and tourist attractions.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:20 PM

Although all part of the same religion these buildings are influenced heavily by their location. I think this is important to note because it challenges our assumptions on Islam. When I think of a mosque a certain image pops into my head, these images shows how the same religion can still have local influences.

Dallas Raulerson's curator insight, April 7, 11:21 AM
This article talks about the reasons why Islamic religious followers build this Mosque and other religious place for Muhammad and other religious people. This relates to our class subject because we are talking about religion and sacred places and why things are built for people or things of there religion or what they believe in.   
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Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

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Crop It

Crop It | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

Thank you Teachinghistory.org.. Could make for future lesson plan. Elizabeth Allen

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 24, 2013 9:48 AM

"Croping" Primary sources

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World Tattoo

World Tattoo | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

I'm not a "tattoo guy," but this is amazing.  On this map, you've got to earn the ink by traveling to the country. 

 

Impressive.  Elizabeth Allen

Tags: images, art, cartography.


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Thousands of Bangladeshis protest after factory fire that killed 112

Thousands of Bangladeshis protest after factory fire that killed 112 | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

Some 200 factories were closed for the day after the protest erupted in zone where over a hundred died in fire. ...

 

When will working conditions change?  How many tragedies are due to Manufacturer's short cuts? This fire has claimed over a hundred lives- many of them are young workers.  The fire alarm sounded, but workers were instructed to go back to work and that the fire alarm was just out of order.  There were no emergency exits, which fire officials  confirm would have saved lives. The unstoppable greed of companies is causing loss for many families.  As quoted from the article, "such dangers have long been a fact of life as the industry has mushroomed to  meet demand from major retailers around the world."  Next time we see - made in Bangladsesh, we need to ask ourselves, "at what cost..."

Elizabeth Allen

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Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

With a simple class hashtag (e.g.-#geog400ric) you can create a backchannel for student to collaborate outside the classroom walls. 


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National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com

National Geographic Magazine - NGM.com | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

All For Water in Africa. A five hour commute to reach the muddy water source...  Hours to fill one can of dirty, contaminated water.  They fill a tank to supply 800 families.   Elizabeth Allen

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Geography on the Job - National Geographic Education

Geography on the Job - National Geographic Education | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

This piece points out how important geography can be for all fields and how it applies to many occupations, not just educators.  Anthropolgists study geography to determine similarities and differences in cultures.  Transportation specialists use urban geography to study pollution, or how to lower it.  They help companies learn to encouragecarpooling or riding bikes instead of everyone commuting in their own vehicle. They can make comparisons as to what may work in one state, but not in another.  GIn dry regions, geographers strategize to find out ways of keeping grassy fileds grassy, instead of turning to desert in dry months. This helps maintain grasslands, which benefit the community and the animals.  Richard Tren works in Africa trying to control malaria.  He needs to consider many geographical factors while trying to stop Malaria.  Geographical factors such as mosquitos requiring warm, humid climates to live play a role in his studies.  He also must respect African culture- many African cultures are against the use of insecticides.  Geography plays a role in international trade.  For successful international trade you need to have knowledge of the country, including its beliefs, cultures, and traditions.  When meeting with another country it would be best if you are familiar with their customs, for example, greeting company members in China may be different than meeting company members in California.  Retailers rely on geography.  They need to build their business in a busy area with easy access for customers.  I see this all of the time: gas stations and dunkin donut shops are usually always parallel with traffic, allowing customers to gain access very easily.  Elizabeth Allen

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 18, 2012 7:42 PM
Geography Awareness Week Nov 10-17th, 2012. Geography Awareness week began in 1987- Happy 25th Anniversary!
Seth Dixon's comment, November 24, 2012 6:13 PM
What is this link about?
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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
An unfinished skyscraper occupied by squatters is a symbol of Venezuela’s financial crisis in the 1990s, state control of the economy and a housing shortage.

 

This skyscraper that was once a symbol of wealth, in an incredible paradigm shift, has now become is occupied by squatters. The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with problems in the rural countryside. A complex web of geographic factors needs to be explained to understand this most fascinating situation. The video link "Squatters on the Skyline" embedded in the article is a must see.

 

Truly amazing. People and businesses occupying an un-safe government owned building. I give them credit for what they have achieved in attempt to survive. The government is obviously falling short in the promise to supply low-income housing. This building was to symbolize "mettle" proving Caracas to be a courageous capital, now it describes the people left to live there. It is sad to see the deplorable conditions that the people are left to live or in, or even worse, to die in. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:34 PM

The video we watched of the squatters living in an unfinished skyscraper was unlike anything I've ever seen before. In a country with such high population rates and a housing shortage, people have gotten creative and made homes in this 45 story building where they share what would have been office spaces and bathrooms.  Over 2,500 people have moved into the dilapidated skyscraper and made a home out of it for their families. They have rigged electricity that the government does not provide for them and built small stores on almost every floor.  The people have not been evicted because the government of Venezuela knows of the housing shortages, yet does not fix it.  

I feel ashamed that a country with so many oil resources has such high rates of poverty and no one is fixing it.  It shows the corruption in the government through an extreme although innovative example.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The problems in Venezuela with housing and the lack of response to the problem by the government has led people to become squatters.  The using of the abandoned buildings was a good idea by the original squatters.  The vacant buildings can house many of the countries it is a shame that the government did not think of this solution to the housing problem and vacant building first, if they had, they could have made sure they were safer for the residence.  The idea of a vertical city springing up in this building is also an interesting one.  Not only are squatters living in these buildings but creating businesses and other services for the residence.

Jess Deady's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:02 PM

In life, I constantly find myself comparing situations with what I read and what I know. Imagine this skyscraper is the Prudential in Boston. How could something meant to be so great fall to its death (and to peoples literal deaths)? One day there is a massive financial building occupied with bankers and lavishness. The next day there is a skyscraper in the form of a house. Housing shortages are happening everywhere and Venezuela is being hit hard in this situation. Imagine visiting this country and asking where someone lives? "Oh, I live in the Tower of David, which used to mean a whole lot more."

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Globalization, Corporations and Franchises

Globalization, Corporations and Franchises | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

McDonald's and Starbucks can be seen as emblematic of the forces of globalization and the 'victors' of process as forcefully displayed in this graphic.  The local distinctive menu (not to mention the chef with a flair) typically loses out to the replicable, standardized and the familiar.  How come?  When is this not the case?  How does this change economics or culture? As a counter-point to globalization benefiting the chains, see how 'Yelp!' is reducing chains market share at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/how-yelp-is-killing-chain-restaurants/2011/10/03/gIQAokJvHL_blog.html

 

 

Many compnaies have to adapt to different cultures. Globalization is part of going outside the norm. Or what is considered the norm in one country is far different than the norm of another.  For business' to strive they have to satisfy the needs of the consumers.  Elizabeth Allen


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M1 ECOM - EJCAM 2015's curator insight, February 11, 2015 3:50 PM

Le graphique ci dessus  représente l'importante des entreprises agro-alimentaires américaines dans le phénomène de Mondialisation : concernant les ventes,  McDonald's arrive en première position suivi de Burger King et KFC. Mc Donald's est l'emblème de l'implantation américaine dans les pays du monde entier. 

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 18, 2015 5:03 PM

This article links to Unit Three through "Globalization". This image shows how McDonald's and Starbucks has connected different parts of the world. Even these two power stores are seen everywhere, and some may argue it can result in place-lessness, this image shows how it can interconnect different countries. Starbucks depends on 19 different countries to make a single cup, and gets products from some of the richest and some of the poorest countries. McDonald's is seen around the world, and adapts to the different countries it has stores in. McDonald's employs more than 1.5 million people, and makes $41 billion in revenue. These two global stores are examples of globalization. 

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 9:07 PM

Summary: This graph shows where Starbucks and McDonald's is mostly consumed, as well as the revenues that they make compared to other restaurants as well as the country of Afghanistan. It also shows where the resources come from that go into one cup of coffee. This graph really emphasizes how pop culture has diffused across the world, and how it affects economies and how it ties in many different countries into the simple process of making a cup of coffee. 

 

Insight: This is a pretty clear example of globalization and how things like food can spread to become a part of worldwide culture. This also shows the division of labour by showing where the coffee, paper, and sugar come from that go into coffee. This can demonstrate which countries are developed and developing through the division of labour.

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Pictures: Amsterdam's Lean, Green Shipping Container Homes

Pictures: Amsterdam's Lean, Green Shipping Container Homes | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

Cargo containers can be readily recycled into affordable housing, providing key environmental benefits.

 

Concept of containerizarion thought of by Malcolm McLean in the 1930s.... Now modern, transformations have taken place.  From transport use to green spaces.  Elizabeth Allen

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P-A-K-I-S-T-A-N

P-A-K-I-S-T-A-N | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   

 

Better than rock, paper, scissors. At least the name incorporates the letters of the homelands.  Elizabeth Allen


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
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FARM-Africa Cassava project

A short film showing the work of FARM-Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) in Uganda. The National Farmers Union (NFU) is working with FARM...

 

The Green Revolution is (belatedly) impacting Africa.  Notice the cultural environment within which agriculture takes place here.   What are the gendered differences in the production of food?  What impact does that have on society?

 

This video helps us to see the innovative ways African farmers use Cassava. Cassava is a market crop that many African people are dependent on. They know in order to achieve an income from the crop they need to market it in different varieties, for example- to turn it in to flour. Cassava is labor intensive crop that can take up to a year to be at it's full potential, but the people, women and children included, know that they need to tend to the crop in every stage to insure its success. With the income from the crop, families are able to send their children to school.  Elizabeth Allen


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:29 PM
Wow not just the men in the video are working this hard, but women and children as well. It makes you think how much we have as Americans and how much we take everything for granted. These African people are tough, they have to do so much more to survive than we do.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 10:46 AM
This video helps us to see the innovative ways African farmers use Cassava. Cassava is a market crop that many African people are dependent on. They know in order to achieve an income from the crop they need to market it in different varieties, for example- to turn it in to flour. Cassava is labor intensive crop that can take up to a year to be at it's full potential, but the people, women and children included, know that they need to tend to the crop in every stage to insure its success. With the income from the crop, families are able to send their children to school.
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British have invaded nine out of ten countries

British have invaded nine out of ten countries | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.

 

This is a great map to show the historical impact of colonialism on the world map.  The map is based on the work in the new book All the Countries We've Ever Invaded: And the Few We Never Got Round To.   

 

Handy map to have as a reference/guide. Elizabeth

 

Tags: book reviews, colonialism, war, historical, UK. 


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:33 PM

The British have done this in reality, in the physical world, in space and time... but perhaps the Chinese have done this in our minds!  Everything our country trades for has parts made in China.  We simply can't live without these things that may be invented in the US, and designed in the US, but assembled in China.... China has a name for itself, and they're playing a game of Monopoly.  They have hotels on Board walk and Park place, and they're eating us alive... I've conferred with politicians, who say that they're on the verge of turning their hidden empire into a physical one, and going from simple monetary domination to war.  They outnumber the US, and have better technology, and evidently more skill and products.  Not much to say about that, but if they learn from the mistakes of the British, the Chinese could really create a truly elite empire that could outlast any other in human history...  But really, if they include American/Chinese cuisine in their menu, I'm sold at General Tao's chicken... Go China! 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:36 PM

This map illustrates just how wide-reaching the British Empire was throughout its history. Though the map cheats a little by including the activities of sanctioned pirates and minor invasions, almost the whole world excepting several very small nations and some difficult to reach inland ones.

 

The most surprising was Sweden considering the proximity and the frequent viking invasions on the British isles which were apparently never reciprocated.

 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:26 AM

The British have had a powerful and colorful history. The British built an empire that has been unmatched in the history of human civilization. At its height, the sun never truly set on its empire. The impact the British Empire had on the globe is astounding. Almost every country in the world has some form of British heritage and influence. The influence has  had both positive and negative attributes. The British Empire spread both knowledge and Slavery to the rest of the globe. The world can never truly escape its British past.

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South African township's solar-powered cafe

South African township's solar-powered cafe | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur converts shipping container into mobile internet shop powered entirely by the sun.

This 2-minute video shows how a an enterpreneur has made his business (an internet cafe) self-sufficient, not relying much on external infrastruture.  Modern Africa has advanced beyond what many in the developed world acknowledge and is beyond some the old stereotypes of that characterize how people view the 'Dark Continent.' 

 

 

Another way of finding use for shipping containers.  Elizabeth Allen

Tags: Africa, technology, development, video.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:36 PM
This shop is awesome. Good for him opening this up randomly, from security guard to owning a solar powered cafe. It gives children the opportunity to become more familiar with the internet and how to use it. What a great idea.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:59 PM

In South Africa, a shipping container is transformed into a mobile internet shop reliant on solar power. While the rest of the world is much more advanced in technology, this shows how non-advanced countries are trying to catch up!

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Sweden's road to EU membership

Sweden's road to EU membership | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
When Sweden joined the European Union on 1 January 1995, it was the culmination of a long period of integration and cooperation with the EU countries.
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