Geography 400 at ric
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Allen from Geography Education
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South Asian floods take economic toll

Environmental degradation, seasonally high rainfall, a low elevation profile and climate change combine in a very bad way for Bangladesh.  Flooding, given these geographic characteristics, is essentially a regular occurence.   For a more in-depth look at these issues from the same media outlet, see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wj0iZiivYJc&feature=player_embedded#!

 

In an area already stricken with poverty, the floods manifest the problems. High rains and low elevations cause massive floods in areas such as Bangladesh and Nepal. Most areas do not receive aid, especially the remote areas of the villages.  The villages are left without drinking water, agriculture is destroyed, and economic activity is no where to be found.  As Dr. Rouf explains, if the contaminated water is consumed people will be struck with sickness and disease.  Nurses fear that dehydration levels will continue to increase if people are not provided claen drinking water.

Elizabeth Allen

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 7, 2012 3:41 PM
The people that live here understand that they will have flooding every year. They're smart to build elevated roads so they have some way of transportation over flooded areas. It's weird to think that this is a normal thing for them and for us we close everything down and wait in our houses.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 12:17 AM
In an area already stricken with poverty, the floods manifest the problems. High rains and low elevations cause massive floods in areas such as Bangladesh and Nepal. Most areas do not receive aid, especially the remote areas of the villages.
Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 4:55 PM

The "socio-economics of flooding" is a side of the natural disaster we don't normally think about. People most affected by floods tend to live in areas with poor infrastructure and large populations. Their displacement to cities, like Dhaka, has incredible cost. For both the family and the new place they relocate to. 

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P-A-K-I-S-T-A-N

P-A-K-I-S-T-A-N | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

"The name of the country Pakistan has a fascinating history - it is essentially an acronym!  Prior to 1947, the country now known as Pakistan was a British colony. In 1947 the United Kingdom granted independence to the region under a new name, Pakistan. The name had been developed by a group of students at Cambridge University who issued a pamphlet in 1933 called Now or Never."

 

In a country with such great ethnic divisions, a common religion is a powerful nationalizing force.  As the capital city of Islamabad's toponym powerfully states (the house or abode of Islam), religion remains an important element of national identity for Pakistanis.   

 

Better than rock, paper, scissors. At least the name incorporates the letters of the homelands.  Elizabeth Allen


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:15 PM

Pakistan is simply abbreviated from it's nations or nations that border Pakistan. P stands for Punjab, A stands for Afghania, K stands for Kashmir, I stands for Iran, S stands for Singh, T stands for Tukharistan, A stands for Afghanistan. However, there is no "N." Instead we classified the last letter as Balochistan but because "stan" is the Persian pronunciation for "country." Pakistan decided to abbreviate "N" as a silent so they can successfully abbreviate "Pakistan" instead of "Pakista."

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:03 PM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon, primarily for how ridiculous it is. Most of us figured there was some decent reason (like the neighboring 'Stan's) for why  and how Pakistan got its name. Nope, there really wasn't any good reason to name it Pakistan, it is an acronym. One that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:47 PM
Until reading this, I thought this was another country that had a "stan" name just like the rest. I never knew that Pakistan received it's makeshift name my a bunch Cambridge University students. It is composed of lands taken from homelands: Punjab, Afghania,, Kashmir, Iran , Sindh, Tukharistan, Afghanistan, and balochistaN.
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India's Census: Lots Of Cellphones, Too Few Toilets

The results of India's once-in-a-decade census reveal a country of 1.2 billion people where millions have access to the latest technology, but millions more lack sanitation and drinking water.

 

More Indians are entering the middle class as personal wealth is transforming South Asia's economy in the private sector.  Yet the government's ability to provide public services to match that growth still lags behind.  Why would it be that it is easier to get a cell phone than a toilet in India?  What will that mean for development?

 

What a difference between luxury and necessity. Yes, everyone feels that cellphones are a necessity. However, in a region that lacks working sanitation and plumbing, cellphones are a luxury. Clearly India is in desperate need of "the basics". With its never-ending growing population, the statisitcs of people lacking proper plumbing will surely rise. It is sad to think of a country where over 60% are without what we take for granted.   Elizabeth Allen


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:59 AM

This sound clip highlights an interesting issue today in India, as the population has exploded the logistics to support these people is nonexistent while access to modern technology is present. Its an odd concept that one can readily find cheap accessible technology such as cell phones or TVs yet something as basic as a toilet or running water is out of reach for many. This is the problem when a population expands faster than it is possible to increase its logistical capacity.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:18 PM

With the lack of toilets and the uprising in the use of cell phones in India, the sanitation and living standards of the people of the country are lacking which in turn comes to a place of hazard. With more people moving into the country and from other areas it is causing a massive uprise in the use of technology but government funding and jobs do not create enough money to continuously keep up with the upgrades needed in sanitation and public safety.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:27 PM

there is a constantly recurring theme here, mass population growth and the government of said country not being able to grow at the same rate to provide simple services to its people

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Rise of solar panel energy in Bangladesh


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Allen's insight:

This reminds me of the power issues in the Phillipines.  The use of soda bottles and water provide light for many villages in the Phillipines....  Here in Bangladesh they rely on green power- solar power.  I am sure now that children can study better at night (because they have light)  they have better progess at school.  Pehaps people in Bangladesh without solar power should adopt the soda bottle technique from the Phillipines.  Elizabeth Allen

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:32 AM

The fact that a Nation like Bangladesh which has such a high population and with it a high poverty rate is is turning to renewable energy is fantastic. While the production and implementation of these panels will be costly initially over time they will pay for themselves. To transport and distribute other forms of energy to so many people is not only logistically a nightmare but also incredibly expensive. By using solar energy their is a far greater chance a wider audience of people will have access to power. 

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:26 AM

I believe solar energy will help improve living in places such as Bangladesh. With solar energy, it can provide light at night, store food, and help to produce and cook food. Telecommunications would also be easier to access.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:28 PM

Because of the rise in solar power energy it is allowing what I would consider a dark country is so important is because it is allowing the people of the area to have a longer day. Most people would be at home in the dark but with this cheap and affordable government funded solar panel they are able to have a longer day and seem to be able to be healthier lifestyle as they are not left out in the dark and able to go to a pharmacy at all times. These solar panels can run up to two light bulbs for ten hours allowing life to continue whether its dark or not.