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Incredible Shrinking Country

Incredible Shrinking Country | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
There are “babyloids” and relatives-for-rent in an increasingly childless Japan.

 

While many parts of the world are concerned with population growth, Japan is struggling to find ways to slow down the demographic decline.  What economic and cultural forces are leading the the changing nature of Japanese demographics?  A video that explains the changing nature of modern Japanese relationships and gender norms can be accessed here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/30/japan-population-decline-youth-no-sex_n_1242014.html

 

This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population(women do not tend to have babies out of wedlock) . Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.  however, there is not much physical decline, most of Japan's population is enjoying a high life expectancy.  Elizabeth Allen


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 9:52 PM
This article helps to see why population is declining so rapidly in Japan. There is not just one contributing factor, but many factors. There is a high suicide rate and low birth rate. Many single Japanese women decide not to have children, while countries such as the US, many single women choose to have children. Japan's high divorce rate will also cause decline in population. Al of these factors that contribute to the decline in Japan's population is hurting the economy. If the population does not start to increase, Japan will be further in trouble.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:30 PM


Japan in the future will have a great economy because there will be more people working than being retired collecting a monthly check. Which means they have more taxes coming in than being given out and they can use that extra money to help create better things for their society.  It also could mean they wont have so much of a deficit like the United States does.

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:21 PM

Japan's shrinking population poses many challenges to the state, namely a shrinking work force. While Japan is a very developed country, it still needs people to continue its growth. Perhaps the government should subsidize families with more than one child? a la reverse One Child policy. As I'm sure Japan would not welcome an influx of Han Chinese.

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Europe's failure to integrate Muslims

Europe's failure to integrate Muslims | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it
Laws restricting Islamic symbols in the public sphere are fuelling political distrust and a shared sense of injustice.

 

One of the free response questions in the 2012 AP Human Geography test focused on increasing Muslim population in many European countries.  The Muslim community has (in the view of most Europeans polled) has not adequately assimilated into European society, and with many Europeans feeling a cultural threat, have created a politically charged situation.  Has Europe failed to integrate Muslims or have Muslims failed to integrate in Europe?  Is this a problem?  Why or why not?  To see the APHG test question, click here:  http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap_frq_human_geo_2012.pdf

 

 

As we leearned in class, Europe has a declining population. If Europe continues to ban certain religions and culture, then obviously its population will continue to decline. It seems as though religion and poitics clash, just as they do elsewhere around the world. If women want to wear headscarves, let them. They are proud of their religion just as many of us are. Seems to me that the world is becoming more secular, restricitve and intrusive than religious  Elizabth Allen


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Elizabeth Allen's comment, October 3, 2012 5:49 PM
As we leearned in class, Europe has a declining population. If Europe continues to ban certain religions and culture, then obviously its population will continue to decline. It seems as though religion and poitics clash, just as they do elsewhere around the world. If women want to wear headscarves, let them. They are proud of their religion just as many of us are. Seems to me that the world is becoming more secular, restricitve and intrusive than religious.
Shayna and Kayla's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This represents the religion section because Europe is restricting islamic symbols causing controversy .

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, February 7, 10:18 AM

Religion: freedom of religion is not a law is some parts of Europe 

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The Russian Cross

The Russian Cross | Geography 400 at ric | Scoop.it

The economic and social turmoil after the fall of the Soviet Union was profound enough to be seen in the demographic statistics.  Birth rates dropped as the death rates went up.  Typically when birth rates drop it is presented as an indicator of social development, but it clearly is not in this instance.  What explains these statistics?

 

Perhaps Russia's social, economic, and high rate of alcohol consumption has contributed to these extreme differences in low birth and high death rates.  Certainly a clear way to recognize post Soviet birth rates declining, while the death rate climbs. From 1992 on the death rate has been noticably higher than the birth rate.   Eilzabeth Allen  


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:15 AM

Judging by this graphic, overall births have dropped, deaths have risen, and natural growth has plummented since the collapse of the USSR in 1991. Like we discussed in class, perhaps more people in Russia were happier under Communism. Even though they were living under a repressive regime and dissidents were violently silenced, more people had bread on their tables- and we can literally see the effects of better govt provided nutrition on the population in this chart.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 12:17 PM

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, the statistics blatantly followed.  Russia's expansion and development has slowed extremely compared to Soviet rule, and the people have taken the same trend.  Citizens are moving away to find better opportunity, they are literally packing bags and simply leaving without a trace.  When the U.S.S.R. was in full swing, the economy and people were all tightly controlled.  In most cases the regime was strict, but there was controlled order and generally speaking, the people had organization and prosperity.  Though not politically free, there were jobs and workers to fulfill them.  Now, the economy has stooped, which led the social statistics to follow.  Russians are realizing that if they have children, how will they support them?  Their income shows it is hard to support others and therefore birth rates have dropped.  Ultimately, it's no wonder the overall natural growth of Russia has drastically dropped within the last 20 years.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:35 PM


This is just like Europe it is incredible how these big countries little by little are becoming much smaller in population because their citizens do not want to have more kids. Russia and Europe have a big problem in there hands that will affect them in the future.