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Sochi 2014: Jamaican bobsleigh team delayed after losing luggage - Telegraph

Sochi 2014: Jamaican bobsleigh team delayed after losing luggage - Telegraph | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Team may be forced to miss training after equpiment goes missing in transit
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article highlights the smallness and largeness of the world.  While we can quickly travel from the Caribbean to Russia, it is not without problems.  Also, the fact that the Jamaican’s will be participating in the bobsleigh event again is exciting.  Best of luck to them!

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Unrest at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

Unrest at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Emissions of gas and ash indicate an increase in activity at Costa Rica’s Turrialba volcano in January 2010.

 

A new vent opened this month on Turriabla, the easternmost of Costa Rica's active volacanoes.  This false-color, near-infrared satellite image would be an effective teaching tool to discuss the importantce of geospatial technologies to monitor the Earth's surface. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article reminds us of how fragile the earth’s crust can be.  The rock can be ‘rotten’ when it is cooled prematurely due to rain, causing it to fracture more easily.

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Jessica Martel's curator insight, April 25, 2013 8:55 PM

its crazy how something so dangerous can be so pretty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:56 PM

Using different teaching methods and technologies is a part of every day life. Figuring out new ways to teach students about observing and identifying whats happening in a photo is highly important. This geospatial photograph can be used in many ways. It can be used to note color differences, and realize that this volcano has emissions that can be seen in the picture erupting from it.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:50 PM

(Central America topic 9)

Having a volcano that looms behind your city suddenly come back to life is about as much of a wakeup call as anybody would want. Though in this case it was determined that a major eruption was not immanent, it raises the question as to weighing the risks of living in such areas.  However, to me it seems that living at the base of Turriabla is not much more risky than living in other regions. Costa Ricans may have to deal with volcanoes, but so do those living around Mt. St. Helens, islands in the Pacific Ring of Fire, and even around Yellowstone. Aside from volcanoes, other environmental risks (floods, droughts, extreme temperatures, hurricanes, blizzards, landslides, tornadoes, wildfires, etc.) are other things just as worthy of being revered. So if you're safe from volcanoes, it's still likely you're more at risk from another form of nature's wrath.

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Making National Geographic Maps

Making National Geographic Maps | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

This map of Cuba, National Geographic's first map of Cuba in over 100 years, has an incredible backstory. 

 

While touring the National Geographic headquarters, the cartographer Juan Valdés (pictured here with me) told me the story of his early days living in Cuba before Castro,  Pictured is one of his 36 meticulous drafts produced to create this cartographic masterpiece of his home country.  To hear it in his own words, embedded in this link is a 18 minute video of his talk at National Geographic on Cuba and the production of the map.  The last 7 minutes are especially helpful for mapping students to see all the decisions and stages involved in creating a professional reference map.

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, National Geographic, Latin America, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The background story of the cartographer along with the explanation of how the map was made was very interesting.  The different steps involved in making a map were interesting and insightful.

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:54 PM

For starters, these pictures were fascinating to look at. It was amazing to see how much time and effort goes in making just one map. The video was informative and really gives you an idea of the unique process that is being done. The pictures fascinated me the most though. You could just tell just by looking at the pictures that they take what they do seriously. Also, you can tell that they are passionate about what they do. You can especially tell that you yourself had a great time and that you were really interested in what was going on. It is really awesome that National Geographic interviewed you about your visit. In the video, it was nice that he started off with some background information about Cuba and the special times that he shared with his father that made him go into cartography. Overall, the pictures and the video were really a sight to see.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:11 PM

This was a great presentation. I cant imagine how long it must take to make an accurate map, especially when these cartographers are so passionate about their work and their craft.  You can tell that to be a cartographer, you must be extremely passionate and dedicated to your craft.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 2015 4:58 PM

It's absolutely crazy to be that Juan Valdes had up to thirty-six different drafts of the map of Cuba, just to come up with the one, most accurate map of the country. When I see maps, I never think of how long it must have taken to get it exactly the way it is to be the most accurate map possible.  It also makes me wonder how completely accurate our maps are, because when comparing multiple, you can see slight differences.

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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I liked this site; it gives a good interactive map of the area showing the paths that the pirates took.  It could be a good teaching tool for a classroom learning about the era of the Caribbean pirates and also teaching kids the geography of the area in a way that would be fun for them.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 9:34 AM

Imagine the horror a native of the Caribbean must have felt when white men came into their scenic lands and pillaged their villages and plundered their treasuries? Blackbeard otherwise known as Edward Teach, would light slow burning cannon fuses and place them in his beard to create an aura about him as he fought and raided these port of call. Calico Jack Rackham, a great pirate name if there ever was one, was best known for having  a pair of female pirates aboard. Instantly becomes one of my heroes! Then you have William Parker who was actually an opportunist backed by England who plundered Spanish treasures throughout Central America. Here is my favorite pirate joke; what is a pirate's favorite letter? "R" you say? No, it's the letter "C", pirates love the sea....

Helen Teague's curator insight, September 14, 2015 9:28 AM

very interesting interactive map

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article was interesting as it shows that the problems faced in the United States due to immigration are not unique.  The friction between old and new immigration seems to be universal.  How different counties handle and adapt to the changing demographics of their people is challenging and shows the character of the population.  I was unaware of the makeup of Belize’s population or that they were an English speaking country.  This article told me a lot about the people of this country. 

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:18 PM

It's interesting to compare and contrast the reaction of Belize's English-speaking population to an influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants with that of the United States. I enjoyed reading that the welcoming of immigrants by the ruling political system has done much to lessen racial tensions, with the various ethnic groups scattered along the political spectrum. This contrasts sharping with the American political spectrum, where there is a clear racial divide between conservatives and liberals. Americans could learn a lot from Belize in this regard, although the transition has been far from smooth in the nation. Although Spanish is now taught in schools as a result of the reality of the immigration wave in the country, there is some push-back from English speaking groups. Many employees of service industries are losing their jobs to those who can offer bilingual services, as well as some other economic changes as a result of the influx of new immigrants. However, the degree of this tension is a lot lower there than it is in the United States. It will be interesting to see how this debate shapes up in the future; it could very well serve as a helpful model for American politicians.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, October 4, 2015 11:49 AM

You won't BELIZE this link.... get it.

I'm hilarious.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:48 PM

This country of Belize seems to be a very interesting place. I never knew that in Central America, there was a country who's official language is English. It is made up of a lot of retired British soldiers and North American "sun seekers." Migration into Belize comes from other place in Central America, of its 300,000 person population, 15% are foreign born. It is now becoming a very mixed country and Spanish is making a gain on English. Schools teach in English, but Spanish lessons are mandatory. A  population boom both helps and hurts the economy. Most migrants are of working age and are willing to work low wages in brutal conditions. A lot of Belizeans tell census that they are not working and with Spanish gaining ground, a lot of monopolistic people are losing jobs to those who are bilingual. Although there are frictions between ethnic groups, in general things are good and political party lines are not divided by ethnicity. 

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The Lost Civilizations of North America documentary DVD Trailer - YouTube

Why don't most Americans, including many historians, know about the highly advanced ancient civilization that existed in the 'Heartland' of North American ne...
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is an interesting presentation conserving the human geography of North America and what has been lost over the years because the natives were not viewed as civilized when the artifacts were discovered.  It is rather sad that this chapter of North American history has not only been forgotten but suppressed by the people who’s agenda was to take land from the native Americans.

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Understanding a Rhode Island Accent

Mark Colozzi of Ocean State Follies translates Rhode Islandese. I recorded most of Charlie Hall's Ocean State Follies performance at Rhode Island College (Oc...

 

This provides a humorous look at a regionally distinct accent and way of speaking from the city I live in, Cranston, RI. This might be tough to follow for some non-Rhode Islanders since many local places, stores and institutions referenced as deeply local. 

 

(As a side note, this version was performed on my college campus and I'm actually in the background of the video since I was running the book sale as a fundraiser for the Shinn Study Abroad Committee. At the 2:30 mark, I'm the guy in the green shirt behind the Cranston sign)


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This funny video highlights how phonetically different words are in different dialects.  This is focused on the sound of the Rhode Island accent and it was interesting to see how the words were spelled when written phonetically.

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Charles Matley's comment, February 1, 2012 1:17 PM
Haha, this is funny because its true. Thank you Dialects.
John Peterson's comment, February 2, 2012 5:13 PM
Sadly this is a very good representation of a true Rhode Island accent, speaking from past experiences with my own family.
Em Marin's comment, February 2, 2012 5:27 PM
he used to teach in my highschool
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The true cost of oil

TED Talks What does environmental devastation actually look like? At TEDxVictoria, photographer Garth Lenz shares shocking photos of the Alberta Tar Sands mining project -- and the beautiful (and vital) ecosystems under threat.

 

This is a visually stunning portrayal of Canadian landscapes.   He shows incredibly gorgeous photographs of the ecosystems of the boreal forest, indigenous cultural landscapes and natural scenery.  This is unfortunately the backdrop for the impacts of industrial extraction of oil from the tar sands of the Athabasca in Canada.  Collectively, this makes for a jarring justaposition of environmental landscapes.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This presentation is very moving on the emotional side of the plight of Canada’s natural resources.  When it comes to oil production no matter where it is it will be dirty, messy and fraught with problems that impact the environment.  The idea that everyone wants oil but they don’t want to mess up their own country to get it is an interesting problem.  Frankly the more developed countries like Canada are more likely to mine the resources responsibly then a country that has little or no environmental protections.  This speaker gives a very impassioned presentation but he offers no alternatives to oil.  Getting oil from a country that has environmental protection laws is cleaner and better then getting it from a country that cares nothing for the environment; it is less accountable and more environmentally damaging to get it from somewhere else.  Pipelines are cleaner ways of moving oil as they seldom leak and don’t crash and spill.  The debate over oil and environmental responsibility will continue until a viable source of clean energy is created. 

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:37 PM

this video shows the beauties to be found in world, and the negative effects that mining for oil can do to these areas. in one region it was home to a type of deer but all they could be found was the deers antlers. that showed that mining for oil was killing all the deer. all these regions are under threat. the largest toxic wastelands on the planet are being created.

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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:26 PM

i see this as a very good law. America is on the verge of recovering from an economic recession and the United States can benefit from every job given to a natural born american citizen. i do see the problems that a  farmer can have such as receiving a decline in profits if they must pay more for the product. in the article the farmers also say that Americans just do not work like seasoned Hispanics and production is way down. another looming problem that the Americans have is that they are slow, and want to call it a day after lunch, and expect to get paid more. 

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:36 PM

As the title implies, this is about how Americans are not cut out for doing intensive farming jobs because the workers just quit quickly. A few politicians mentioned in the story, Governor Robert Bentley and Senator Scott Beason, said they received thank you messages from constituents who found work. This was supposed to be evidence of Americans benefitting from jobs that immigrants took, but I would love to know how many of those people actually stayed with the job. Furthermore, I find it a bit too suspicious that none of the people wanted to speak with the press as the author mentioned or that the names just weren’t given. I am more inclined to believe the owners of the famers mentioned in the article, who said they can’t keep Americans on their site happy due to lack of pay and benefits. Mind you now it wasn’t just one owner who said this either. I think this is telling as well because the owners are the individuals who best know the industry as they work it every day.

 

From the farmers perspective the new law is now a huge problem that could also affected consumers. They lost steady “Hispanics with experience,” who they knew could handle the work. For some farmers, according to the article, has made it so the produce is left on the vine rotting because it isn’t picked. So in essence, what the Arizona law just did was harm agriculture and the buyers too because if enough of that food perishes the price will go up. Now I can understand a state being aggravated over illegal immigration (it is a serious problem that is nowhere close to being solved), but to pass a law with these kinds of economic ramifications isn’t really helping the situation much either. As much as people hate to admit it, our economy needs immigrants from Mexico for our agriculture sector to work. It is just a little known fact.

 

The new law isn’t the only law at issue in this article. Connie Horner of Georgia tried to legally hire workers through the government’s visa program. She soon found it is too costly for her to do and too time consuming, so instead Ms. Horner is turning to machines. The fact that visas are that hard to attain for workers is also part of the reason the immigrants come illegally. Rather than spending more money to watch the boarder how about the government figure out a way for the bureaucracy of the immigration process to move quicker. This isn’t an issue of 2011 either when the article was written. Listening to the news, I have heard farmers complain about the visa program for years. No wonder immigrants come over illegally and then citizens get angry at these people. Really, American’s should be more annoyed with their government’s ineffective stance on boarder control. 

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A Wave of Sewing Jobs as Orders Pile Up at U.S. Factories

A Wave of Sewing Jobs as Orders Pile Up at U.S. Factories | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Factories are finding that years of doing business overseas has withered what once was a thriving textile and apparel work force in the United States.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article highlights the biggest problem in the American job market today, the skill gap.  People have been told for years that the only way to a good job is to go to college.  This is not always true and this article highlights this.  There are skilled trades out there but no one skilled to do them.  This problem needs to be addressed so that the unemployed work force can be trained to do these types of jobs.  Young people today seem to feel that the only way is a college degree but this article highlights the other paths to work which are through skilled trade labor.  People complain that nothing is made here but there are reasons for that and when companies try to bring industry back to America they encounter the skill gap. 

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Miss. Dinsmore's curator insight, October 29, 2013 8:28 AM

News concerning sewing and apparel

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:06 PM

Manufacturing companies have to weigh the pros and cons of outsourcing or staying domestic.  Many companies have chosen profits over quality and safety by outsourcing jobs over the past couple decades.  Outsourcing of jobs is a product of globalization.  However, the internet and other informational resources are also a large part of globalization which have allowed citizens of the United States to be exposed to what is actually happening in these outsourced manufacturing factories (similar to the role photography played in exposing behind-the-scenes truths of the United State's domestic manufacturing during the Industrial Revolution).  The demand for domestic-made products is increasing, and companies are listening.  However, the years that these jobs have been overseas have allowed not only the specialized skills of domestic workers to disappear, but also the creation of stigmas towards these jobs.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:16 PM

This article is quite interesting.  Everyone seems to complain that more product needs to be made in the USA instead of elsewhere in poorer countries.  This company in Minnesota is doing just that.  After receiving complaints about not enough product being made here they decided to leave countries where safety is not such an issue and bring it home.  Now the problem lies with finding skilled workers here.  Being a 'sewer' isn't very glamourous and not appealing to the youth of America.  This being said, it is going to be very difficult to bring jobs back to America when no one here is interested in putting the energy forth to gain the skills needed to hold these positions. 

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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 2014 11:12 AM

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:54 PM

This is an interesting way to educate people around the world of the places that most people don't think about. its interesting to see the technology with the tribes people to see how it actually benefits their folk culture by preserving the land.

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Panama Canal work stoppage denied

Panama Canal work stoppage denied | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Spanish building company Sacyr denies that work on the expansion of the Panama Canal has been halted, but confirms a breakdown in negotiations.
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is an important story because the Panama Canal is one of the world’s most important shipping lanes.  Without it, the length of time it takes for larger ships to go around South America would increase substantially and effect the coast of goods being shipped.  Hopefully this dispute will be resolved soon.

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Migrants’ New Paths Reshaping Latin America

Migrants’ New Paths Reshaping Latin America | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
In Mexico and Latin America, old migratory patterns are changing as migrants move to a wider range of cities and countries, creating regional challenges and opportunities.

 

Diffusion and patterns of migration are by their nature, going to be fluctuating.  Whether and why people stay or go, has profound impacts on the human geographic landscape of a variety of regions.  With less Latin American migrants coming to the United States and the Maquiladora zone of Northern Mexico, this has allowed southern Mexico and other countries to reap the benefits of maintaining portions of their most educated and entrepreneurial population. 


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article points out how when the pattern of immigration shifts it creates new challenges for the country of immigration, even if it is internal migration as opposed to external migration.  The path and flow of people moving from place to place can change the shape and nature of a country.  

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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:10 AM

My insight on this would be how that Latin American countries have more educated people than other countries, then they spread to surrounding counties, providing many challenges and opportunities. Some opportunities would be that speading education would bring jobs. And the challenges would be the issue of mixing diversities, which could cause stds and gene mutations.- walker

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:52 PM

Consequences of migration: socioeconomic, cultural, environmental, and political; immigration policies; remittances-

This article speaks of how migratory patterns are changing for illegal immigrants, and how it is causing problems. It states that as more countries and cities are exploited, their needs to be more jobs created. Sometimes, even new immigration policies are needed.

 

This article portrays the idea of consequences of Migration because it speaks of what those nations must do in order to thrive and survive the wave of illegal immigrants.

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Will Puerto Rico Be America’s 51st State?

Will Puerto Rico Be America’s 51st State? | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Millions of American citizens on the island have spoken. Now, Washington must act.

 

After the Nov. 6th referendum, the question of Puerto Rico's political status vis-a-vis the United States for the future is actually murkier than it was before.  The Puerto Rican voters have spoken, but the meanings of the plebiscite results are still being debated. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I agree with the author of this piece.  Americas ignore Porto Rico and just pretend it isn’t there.  As a Territory of the United States, it should be of more interest to us.  Those hold over from out colonial past needs to be dealt with and the people of Puerto Rico need to be given a choice of statehood or some other option that will work for them.  Puerto Rico has been a part of America for over a hundred years and it should not be kept in a a state of limbo.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 5:35 PM

The author of this article provided a unique insight about what it meant to be from Puerto Rico when she recalled her memory from her fourth grade class. People clearly recognize themselves as Puerto Rican and not American although the President is considered their head of state.  It is understandable why national identity would be be confusing.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 5, 2015 2:20 PM

I found the article very interesting.  It makes sense that the Republican party would not want 4 million Hispanic voters.  It is interesting that the island is "colonial" in nature.  I guess in a way it is being kept like that.  I don't see the US giving it up or "selling" it as the 4th grader suggested because of pure vanity.  The island would have to sink for the US to give it up.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 24, 2015 6:40 AM

The recent plebiscite on the future of Puerto Ricos political status  was extremely flawed. The current commonwealth option was not listed on the ballot. Many people left that portion of their ballot blank. The 61 percent of people who voted for statehood, is more likely closer to 45 percent. It is sad that a clear and decisive  election could not have been held. Puerto Rico deserves to have its problematic political status resolved. While I personally  favor statehood, Congress has made the right decision when it comes to ignoring these results.  

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Protest over Haiti slum eviction

Protest over Haiti slum eviction | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Residents of hillside shanties above the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince protest against plans to clear their homes for a flood-protection project.

 

Even before the earthquake, Port-au-Prince was a city filled with slums.  The earthquake exacerbated so many of the urban, economic and environmental issues.  This eviction of the flood plains has class implications as the poor feel that they are being unfairly targeted in plans to improve the city. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

It is hard to relate to this type of article in America.  Unlike third world countries, we do not allow this type of building to occur, but perhaps mobile homes in tornado alley might be a comparison.  The safety of the people in environmental disaster areas must be weighed against the ability of them to afford a home.  How to strike this balance is important and political.  Are their homes being unfairly targeted or are the better built homes simply safer and so they do not need to be moved?  This article is important because it outlines the problems in Haiti and other third world countries that don’t have strict building codes and shanty towns spring up.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:08 PM

Geography and geographical events plays a great role in shaping the course of human civilization, and the 2010 Haitian earthquake is no exception. The devastation that occurred as a result of the earthquake has had severe political and economic consequences for the Haitian people and government, in part because the nation is the poorest in the Western Hemisphere. Despite Western aid, thousands of people have yet to relocate so safer areas or find new homes. This example of the dismantling of slums is a sad story, where the government refuses to allow citizens to live there, but cannot offer them somewhere to go. Despite the government citing safety concerns for the dissolution of the slums, many poor citizens feel that it is a gentrification plan and that they are being unfairly targeted- it would be interesting to see if richer Haitians are allowed to remain in similar areas, which would totally undermine the "safety" argument held by the government. Thousands of Haitians again find themselves homeless, adding to a legacy of devastation and human suffering left by the 2010 earthquake. Geography: 1, Humanity: 0.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:16 PM

While I can understand why the government feels the need to assert this project, the talk about the poor always being targeted struck a cord. The government hasn't been able too supply stable housing as it is for the recently displaced Haitians so why would these people believe that they would replace their homes? In one of my recent scoop its Mexico talked of lessons that need to be followed and one of them was " lesson the corrosive affects of a general lack of trust". I would have to say that Haiti could benefit from working on this.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:53 AM

on the one hand the government has a point. the neighborhood which they plan on destroying is at risk, and those people would be better off living somewhere else, but on the other hand they must provide housing in exchange if the residents cannot afford to get new housing for themselves when the time comes to move.

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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:00 PM

While the Aztec' civilization has been gone for a very long time, there are still traces of it resurfacing today. With the uncovering of the bones, it shows that the Aztec temple was very much in the heart of Mexico City has still has more secrets to uncover

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:39 PM

This article shows just how varied the cultural landscape of Mexico is.  Unlike the Native populations in the US, the Aztecs had a large, flourishing civilization that was described by the first conquistadors "to match the glory of any major city in Europe."  When the Spanish eventually conquered the Aztec Civilization, they built right on top of the ruins of the old Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan.  The way that Mexico City is layered right on top of the old Aztec city, means that many human remains and ancient buildings are buried right below the modern city.  This is what makes Mexico City different than any city in the United States or Canada, the cities in these two countries were not built over massive cities that pre-dated them.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:07 PM

This seems to be quite a large sacrifice that was discovered. And while it may be just that, it seems more like a mass execution, possibly performed by the Spanish when they battled with the Aztecs and put at the foot near the Aztec temple to send a message that their God could not save them.  If it is a sacrifice, its a pretty large one.

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nam.html

nam.html | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This sight has links to maps of North America during different geological periods with a modern line map of North America superimposed over it so you can see how it has changed.  I found this sight interesting; it gives you the idea of how different the surface of the world has been in the last 4.6 billion years.

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Chicago on the Eve of the Great Fire

Chicago on the Eve of the Great Fire | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
This 1868 pocket map of Chicago shows the city in full-blown expansion, a mere 3 years before the infamous blaze

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This map is cool.  It lets you compare the old map to the new map by moving a lens around the satellite map.  It is a great interactive tool to compare old and new and allows the viewer to see how much the geography of the city has changed in the last 150 years or so.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2013 12:35 PM

This interactive map with a 'spyglass' feature.  Chicago is displaced during a economic boom period as the U.S. was expanding westward.  Where where the railroads located then?  Why have some of them vanished today?  Notice anything curious about the coastline along Lake Michigan?  Follow this link to see similar interactives of other major U.S. cities.


Tags: Chicago, historical

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 11:07 AM

An interesting map which shows the difference between present day Chicago and 1868 Chicago. It illustrates what a dramatic transformation the city has undergone in the last 150 years. The trains and their tracks, which were such an important part of 1800's travel and logistics, were all removed and replaced with roads for automobiles. Lake Michigan was filled in approximately 1000 feet to expand the city to the east. Where Soldier Field now sits, was once roughly 150 feet into Lake Michigan. To the west, the 1868 map shows large squares of undeveloped city which is today subdivided into entire neighborhoods. Yet, while there are a lot of differences, it's surprising how much is still the same. Much of the developed part of 1868 Chicago has the same layout as today. The buildings may have changed, but the locations of buildings and streets are the same as they were then, a likely product of inertia since it would take more effort to restructure the city than renovate it.

A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 24, 2014 10:09 PM

This map is truly revealing of how far Chicago has progressed!

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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video available. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:15 PM

It is amazing that over 600 people come into Canada a day and settle into areas that used to be quite little farming land. These areas are now home to North Americas second largest Asian communities. Canada now has 260 ethnic enclave neighborhoods and they are an important part of Canadas landscape. They are mostly moving into the suburbs where land is cheaper and in my opinion I think they are moving there for job and because they concider it safer. They are also closing down the business of the families that have been their forever and cant compete like the greek families.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 2014 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

Gubert's curator insight, February 11, 2015 5:17 AM

XIPHIAS Immigration is one among the Top Five Immigration Consultants in India according to The siliconindia as Top Five Most Promising Immigration Consultants. www.xiphiasimmigration,com

 

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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video was entertaining and informative.  I was aware of some of the information he related but was unaware of the “no touching” zone and I found it amusing.  The saying that good fences make good neighbors is taken to an extreme here.  The odd shape of boarders has always been interesting to me.  Reasons why a boarder has a shape are always interesting and sometimes amusing.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

quizzes for my class

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 6:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:20 PM

I hope the lizard point Geography tests are enough. I have sent you my screenshots for the ones I have taken.