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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."


Via Seth Dixon, Jess Deady
Fern Torres's insight:

Perception is everything!

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 12:24 PM

As a potential buyer the seller wants you to see this image as the advert side but on the other hand the reality is what the owner would be living next to. This gives insight on the perseption of a tradtional "fisherman's cottage" opposed to the reality.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 6:19 PM

Versões...

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Indonesia election may hinge on economy

Indonesia election may hinge on economy | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
Indonesia's economy is the biggest in Southeast Asia, but how fast it continues to grow will be a key issue in the upcoming elections.

Via Jess Deady
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 11:36 PM

Reforms such as these ones need to be made when your dealing with growth of the economy slowing down. In order to keep the election going, the Indonesian economy should be dealt with first and foremost.

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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 23, 11:29 PM

Inland water year 10 , River landscapes year 8 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2:10 PM

Interesting to see the correlation between waterways and population.It is very important to pick a place to live that you will be able to not only thrive but survive. Being cognizant of where flood planes are located as well as growing areas is  also very important.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 10, 12:01 PM

I love the way people have learned to adapt and survive around mother nature. Also that mother nature has adapted to itself! Instead of just dumping run-off into a single stream, it's managed to spread it out and distribute its sediment around allowing the land to strive

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'I will sell them,' Boko Haram leader says of kidnapped Nigerian girls

'I will sell them,' Boko Haram leader says of kidnapped Nigerian girls | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
Fears for the fate of more than 200 Nigerian girls turned even more nightmarish when the leader of the Islamist group that kidnapped them said he'll sell them.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 9:46 AM

I have hesitated to post about this topic for several reasons (unsure of the regional context, painful topic, religious overtones, etc.) but feel that it is important enough that it simply can't be ignored.  The abductions have triggered massive protests as we see the convergence of modern social mobilization and intelligence versus old-fashioned brute force.  This video is a quick introduction to the group Boko Haram and this article discusses their current activities.  Boko Haram came to power because of ecological disaster, oil politics and corruption.  Amnesty Internat'l answers the difficult question, "what can be done?"

 

Tags: Nigeria, slavery.

SwagQueen's curator insight, May 8, 8:28 PM

i think Boko Haram is a Stupid moron who should be put into jail. the Nigerian government to save our girls. Innocent girls are being taken away from their homes and their parents want them back.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 12:33 PM

Every one should see this video 4 reasons why Boko Haram does what it does. A bunch of idiots

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Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:21 PM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:35 PM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

Mrs. K's curator insight, August 27, 7:17 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

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What is halal meat?

What is halal meat? | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"There have been calls for clearer labelling of halal products in shops, restaurants and takeaways. But what is halal food? And why are campaigners so concerned?"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 8, 3:47 PM

I know just enough Arabic to read the word Halal (حلال) and know that it means permissible, the opposite of Haram (حَرَام‎) which means forbidden or illegal.  In the context of meat, it means meat that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people).  Today, Halal is becoming an important issue within the European Union for two main reasons: 1) more Muslims are migrating to Europe and 2) Europeans are searching for less artificial food products.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe.  If you want to see the inner workings of a Halal slaughterhouse in New York, this video will show you what it is like.   

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 7:14 AM

Halal means permissible, the opposite of Haram  which means forbidden or illegal. 


Halal meat means that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people). 


Within the European Union more Muslims are migrating to Europe.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe. - From Seth Dixon

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Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore

Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"A block-long sinkhole opened up in a residential neighborhood in rain-soaked Baltimore on Wednesday, devouring cars and forcing the evacuation of several houses."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 1, 4:35 PM

We like to think that the Earth beneath our feet is solid and that the configuration of the landforms in our neighborhood will be unchanging.  This a dramatic reminder that Earth's physical processes don't ever stop--even if we've built a city in that spot.  Watch this retaining wall collapse in this video.


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landformsweather and climateurban ecology.

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 10:57 PM
Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore
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Sports Movies and Globalization

Hamm said he was drawn to the true story of an agent looking for India's first pro-baseball player

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 10:16 PM

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals). 


Tags: sport, globalization, popular culture, economic, labor, India.

Nicky Mohan's curator insight, May 5, 6:31 PM

There's an absolute treasure trove of not only movies but also games that are very powerful for educational purposes. It is something that students can relate to. It is relevant & interesting.

Jyoti Chouhan's curator insight, May 13, 1:45 PM

This 6 minute clip is a preview of the movie "Million Dollar Arm."  It looks to be a fun movie, but what I find academically interesting about the movie is that it is a portrayal of one of the countless fascinating cultural and economic interactions that was created by globalization.  The story is about the economic forces motivating baseball scouts to seek out untapped labor pools in areas such as India that were previously not a part of baseball's cultural reach (and the really cool global lives of these individuals).

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22 International Borders

22 International Borders | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."


Via Seth Dixon
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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 10:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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Island shown in Google Maps doesn’t actually exist

Island shown in Google Maps doesn’t actually exist | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

There’s a South Pacific island positioned midway between Australia and New Caledonia featured on various marine charts, world maps, and has appeared in publications since at least the year 2000. It’s listed as Sandy Island on Google Maps and Google Earth, and yet Australian scientists have just discovered it doesn’t exist.

 

As part of a 25-day voyage, the group went to the area, only to find  a 1,400m (4,620ft) deep section of the Coral Sea. The team collected 197 different rock samples, more than 6800km of marine geophysical data, and mapped over 14,000 square kilometers of the ocean floor.  This is just a reminder that a map is only as reliable as the information used to compile that map (see BBC article as well).   For another reminder of this same idea see "The Republic of Null Island." 


Via Seth Dixon, Jess Deady
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 10:36 AM

Typical. How many times do we see information on the internet thats not totally accurate? Although maps such as Google Maps should be accurate enough for people to trust them this wasn't the case. Who knows why there is this random island that doesn't actually exist on the map?

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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea : NPR

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Everyone Speaks Text Message

Everyone Speaks Text Message | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
Is technology killing indigenous languages or saving them?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Indonesia Field Report III – The Orangutan's Road: Illegal Logging and Mining ... - Brookings Institution

Indonesia Field Report III – The Orangutan's Road: Illegal Logging and Mining ... - Brookings Institution | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

Indonesia Field Report III – The Orangutan's Road: Illegal Logging and Mining ...


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PapuaWeneNdugure's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:02 AM

Indonesia Field Report III – The Orangutan's Road: Illegal Logging and Mining ...

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Using State Maps in School

Using State Maps in School | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place."


Via Seth Dixon
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:03 PM

Using maps in school is a concern for many educators that know the value of map skills. This article romanticizes maps and the importance of maps and studying them.

Maps are important for location as they can show absolute location to relative location and help with mental maps.

miya harris's curator insight, August 21, 10:10 AM

I think that it is very smart to show large scale maps in schools.Large scale maps can help students to understand their locations better because they can see them in greater detail.Roads,buildings,and water element become more clear.I think every school should have a large scale map to help students better under stand their town, county, or state.

Rachael Johns's curator insight, August 21, 9:31 PM

This is a great idea because students will be able to learn more with the hands on action. Most students just write or copy down notes that they don't really pay attention to but with this the student is more likely to learn from it because they have to measure out where to put the location, name the place that they're plotting, and put the note beside it about why it's important. This will also help students learn the location of places better because they're the ones actually making the map.     ~ R.J ~

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Oceania News - World News Report

Oceania News - World News Report | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
Oceania News Service from EIN News; Media Monitoring & Online News Coverage of Oceania News

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 11:57 PM

First article.

Go figure that someone will go to jail if they are caught spying on electoral votes. That should be an outrageous crime and having people in the regime do so is highly unethical. Winners win and losers lose. Thats the purpose in voting after all.

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Borderlands: The New Strategic Landscape

Borderlands: The New Strategic Landscape | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 5:19 PM

Since the Russian annexation of Crimea, the interest in geopolitics has climbed.  Many feel as though the post-Cold War World political paradigm has changed and it has.  John Kerry has even accused Russia of using 19th century tactics to solve a 21st century problem.  This comment highlights how many Americans and American government officials took for granted that the ‘New World Order’ after the fall of the Soviet Union was a permanent condition.  This article from Foreign Policy argues that it is the Americans how are caught in a geopolitical time warp, imagining that the American global hegemony of the 1990s represented the ‘end of history,’ and that geopolitical power will still be a major force in the foreseeable future.  With this in mind old concepts in geopolitics such as borderlands and buffer zones are being revived and analyzed anew.


Tags: geopoliticspolitical, conflict.

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Growth Rings

Growth Rings | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."


Via Seth Dixon
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Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 8:01 PM

The donut effect!

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:38 PM

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 4:25 PM

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.

 

For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.


Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 11:00 AM

As marijuana becomes more common and increasingly legitimized in the United States, the international drug market is beginning to feel the effects. Drug cartel traffickers have begun settling and growing on American soil, but it would seem even that will not help them compete with the new mass of medical and recreational marijuana grown "professionally" elsewhere in the country. This, paired with other news articles claiming states can earn billions off marijuana taxes, offer more support to the argument for legalization.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 7:39 PM

This article shows that what happen in one country can have an effect on another. The decriminalization of marijuana in the U.S is causing the business of the cartels to drop 75%, and with the DEA spending $2 billion to keep illegal drugs from crossing the border, it is making people feel safer.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 10, 10:53 AM

I'm sorry that these cartels are losing money but I'm not sorry that America is now growing their own. Maybe now there will be less deaths over something so simple as weed.

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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:38 PM

Its great to see countries coming together for one purpose and in this case the "Green Wall" to help protect and restore ecosystems in North Africa.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:32 PM

The Green Wall hopes to restore the environment of the North African area that was destroyed by desertification from overgrazing.

Desertification is one of the many consequences of Human-Environment Interaction that comes mainly from agricultural activity.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 31, 12:03 AM

I'm glad that something is being done before its too late.  It seems lately that we want to fix things after the damage has been done.  It is also helpful that all the political leaders are on board to do what needs to be done to keep the desertification process from happening.  Although the idea as a whole is huge, I'm impressed by the fact that each country is contributing in their own way.  They are creating a plan that benefits them and works for the green wall project.  Not only does this plan solve the desertification process it can also help with the starving people in the nation.  With the growth of fruit bearing trees coming back into the region it can help begin to feed the nations hungry.

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


Via Seth Dixon
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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:24 PM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:45 PM

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 6, 2:49 PM

The spatial population of Mexico City is densely packed. The south-west side of the city or the Western Sector zone features upscale, wealthy neighborhoods. The north and eastern sectors of the city are densely populated and are the poorer sectors of the city. It is interesting looking at the city from a top-down aerial view. One can see that the wealthier western sector’s spatial geography is spread out more so than the poorer sectors and features more vegetation, possibly due to an environmentally friendly irrigation system. 

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For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die'

For the Muslims of CAR, it's 'leave or die' | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
Thousands of Muslims in the Central African Republic have fled as UN chief warns of 'ethno-religious cleansing'.

 

Leave or die.  It's come down to this for the Muslims of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic.  Muslims here once lived freely among the Christian majority, running businesses and praying in mosques. Now, many of the city's Muslims have fled, and on Sunday about 1,300 Muslims from Bangui's PK12 neighbourhood were evacuated to safety by peacekeeping forces.

Already one of the world's poorest countries, CAR has seen a wave of upheaval and violence in the past 15 months. The 10-month reign of the Muslim-dominated Seleka rebel group inflamed intercommunal tensions in the country, and spurred the rise of Christian militias called the anti-Balaka.  Once the Seleka was forced out of power in January, the anti-Balaka rampaged, targeting Muslims across the country for their perceived support of the Seleka and its bloody excesses.


Via Seth Dixon
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 12:36 PM

units 2-3-4

 

ALOT of connections here!!!

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 10:09 AM

This is an example of how citizens are sometimes held accountable for the governments actions.  Central African Republic  has already been facing hardships and its recent governance by  a Muslim majority group known as the Seleka has only made things worse.  Anti-Muslim Christian groups have sprung up in the aftermath of the government.  They have been brutally killing and forcing Muslims to flee; they have no easy feelings towards Muslims.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 9:30 PM

Also this interactive feature is worth your time...it won't make you feel all sunshine and rainbows, but the hard truth rarely does. 

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The white tourist’s burden

The white tourist’s burden | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"Growing Western demand for altruistic vacations is feeding the white-savior industrial complex.  Volunteerism presents an escape, a rare encounter with an authenticity sorely missed, hardship palpably and physically felt – for a small price."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 6:02 PM

As stated in this article, "Under this program, well-to-do tourists sign up to build schools, clean and restore riverbanks, ring birds and act as caregivers to AIDS orphans for a few weeks. This led to the creation of a profitable industry catering to volunteer tourists. The orphans’ conditions are effectively transformed into a boutique package in which 'saving' them yields profits from tourists. The foreigners’ ability to pay for the privilege of volunteering crowds out local workers."  For a satirical look at this type of tourism, the Onion absolutely delivers.  

Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2:22 PM

Why not take advantage of "I feel guilty because Im doing exponentially better than them?" or the less politically correct term - "white guilt." Arguably this can be seen as the "those that have" feeling guilty and thinking that by volunteering for a few weeks will make them feel better about their rampant consumerism. As the article points out though, this is not a problem solver. You can build homes for people but without giving them a foundation(and education) in how to take "proper" care of themselves, as well as the proper infrastructure to support them, they will continue to beg, or be unable to find work(if there is any) that will give them the security they need to support the house given to them, or take care of any well water that has been established, etc, etc. Unfortunately, many of the volunteers who pay to volunteer do not want to fix the bigger picture but instead want to get a small taste of it so that they can talk about it over cocktails or use their Kodak moment for a new Facebook default.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
I have heard from people working long term with schools and orphanages the short term volunteer culture causes more harm than good.Seth Dixon sums this article up:

As stated in this article, "Under this program, well-to-do tourists sign up to build schools, clean and restore riverbanks, ring birds and act as caregivers to AIDS orphans for a few weeks. This led to the creation of a profitable industry catering to volunteer tourists. The orphans’ conditions are effectively transformed into a boutique package in which 'saving' them yields profits from tourists. The foreigners’ ability to pay for the privilege of volunteering crowds out local workers."  For a satirical look at this type of tourism, the Onion absolutely delivers.  

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The Power of Mobile Technology for the Exchange of Indigenous Knowledge

The Power of Mobile Technology for the Exchange of Indigenous Knowledge | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it
Ethnos Project - an advocacy blog & information resource about culture & development, digital technology and indigenous knowledge.

Via Deutsche Welle Global Media Forum
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Illegal logging takes 30 football fields a minute: why isn't Australia acting?

Illegal logging takes 30 football fields a minute: why isn't Australia acting? | Geography 200 FT | Scoop.it

"As documented in a recent report by the World Bank, “Justice for the Forests,” illegal logging is now a massive criminal enterprise, rivaling the illegal drug trade and robbing developing nations of up to US$15 billion in revenues annually. Of the 15 top timber-producing nations, two-thirds lose over half of their timber to illegal loggers, with some losing up to 90%."


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Economic Decline and Sense of Place

"McDowell County, situated in the coalfields of West Virginia, has experienced a great boom-and-bust since 1950. But despite the economic decline and population loss, many still call it home and feel a great sense of purpose among the mountains. Residents speak about their connection to this place and the meaning of 'home.' Hear more stories at hollowdocumentary.com "


Via Seth Dixon
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dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 6:51 PM

Excellent example of urban decline. Would pair nicely with a reading from 'Rocket Boys' by Homer Hickam Jnr, or with the movie version 'October Sky.' The book and movie are the true story of a boy in Coalwood, West Virginia in the 1950s who is determined to  "escape" working in the coal mines to become a rocket scientist.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, September 16, 11:02 PM

 McDowell, a once thriving county in the 1950’s ceased to keep up with the ever-chaning world. There was little need for coal after the 1980’s so work became scarce and the “Brain Drain” began. Those looking for a successful future left for there was more choice elsewhere and economically it would make no sense to stay in McDowell. Nevertheless, cultural upbringings paved way to this "Boom and Bust” town, which gave people a sense of place and identity. Though McDowell is economically on the decline the communal relations and sense of place the community holds is still strong. 

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 3:41 AM

Develop your sense of place regarding the coalfields of West Virginia.

What geographic context (location) might create a place like McDowell County, West Virginia?