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Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps

Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"One of the people I regard most highly here at Esri has created an online atlas of Mexico.  The maps can be accessed in many different ways, such as an ArcGIS Online presentation with a description here, as an iPad iBook, but I think most importantly, as a series of story maps.  Each of these separate story maps contains 1 to 6 thematically related maps on the following topics:

Explore Mexico (Crime vs. Tourism)Mexico’s Natural WondersMexico’s Historical MonumentsGeography of Mexico – Did You Know?Indigenous People of MexicoCartograms of Mexico

 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This site is neat.  The ability to use interactive maps to explore this country is very informative.  I recommend this site to anyone interesting in learning more about Mexico!

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 8, 10:37 AM

These maps are very impressive. There is a large amount of information here about population, crime, and natural/man made attractions. In particular, I was impressed by all the natural attractions, such as the 400+ foot waterfall and the plethora of cenote on the Yucatan peninsula. I was also surprised by the large number of Aztec and Mayan structures which still stand today.

 

The map on crime shows that the majority of the murder in Mexico occurs in Juarez and other border cities as part of the cartel drug wars while the murder rate in the rest of the country is relatively low (even in Mexico City). When compared to Honduras and El Salvador, Mexico is practically a murder-free utopia. Other maps, like the rainfall map, show why the Mayans flourished for a time on the Yucatan due to its "Goldilocks" level of rainfall compared to the arid northern parts and the drenched southern parts of Mexico. 

Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:00 AM

I had no idea Honduras was the country with the highest murder rate in the entire world! These map are extremely interesting, as we see the obvious tourist destinations are everywhere on the coasts as opposed to the interior of the country of Mexico, yet the majority of the historical structures are in the interior centered around Mexico City.

Jess Deady's curator insight, Today, 10:17 AM

These maps all come together in a somewhat story-like sense. They are thematically related and can be separated to be able to look at each map individually. I like how there are multiple ways to access the maps.

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

quizzes for my class

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Amy Marques's curator insight, January 23, 7:15 PM

This is definitely a great way to see how much you’ve really remembered since elementary school!

AckerbauHalle's curator insight, January 24, 12:44 AM

Kleiner Beitrag zur Geographie: Ein online Spiel um regionale Kenntnisse zu erweitern 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 6:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

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Video: China Halts Shipments of Rare Earths

cIn September, China stopped shipping rare earths, minerals crucial to military, cell phone and green technologies, to countries around the world. A report from the Bureau for International Reporting.
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video raises the points that in order to go green we need to mine rear earths.  We have relied on China to do it and now that China is using the materials domestically, the rest of the world will have to find new places to exploit these minerals.  The video pointed out that people who think mining is evil must realize that in order to go green the minerals are needed if the mining doesn’t happen then the green tech doesn’t happen either.  It’s easy to preach going green but when faced with the impact on the environment, such as mining, people balk and say not in my backyard. 

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East Asia energy geography: Where does Indonesia stand?

East Asia energy geography: Where does Indonesia stand? | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Northeast Asia is just as important in this region in relation to energy and geography. Most notably, Japan and China are the world’s largest ...
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

As the countries that have exported fuel to the developed countries of East Asia begin to develop and continue to become more energy dependent the fuel shipped abroad to East Asia will go down.  Countries like Japan who have no resources of their own will be forced to pay higher prices for less fuel and have to turn to their countries or forms of energy production.

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

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Annika Della Vedova's comment, May 4, 2013 4:05 PM
Because of the gender imbalance females get more of a chose on who they marry. They are however basing much of their choose on wealth. because of this their are about 40-50 million bachelors who are mostly poor.
Cassie Frazier's comment, May 4, 2013 8:45 PM
Today in China, love has become more about wealth than romance. Because of the gender imbalance created by the one child policy, there are many more men than women, as boys are the preferred sex. This has shifted the task of choosing a spouse to the women, and they want fancy things. Therefore, they tend to choose the rich to marry. The problem is that there are at least 40-50 million poor men in China, and the majority are alone. When men reach 30 and are still unmarried, they are called "leftovers". These men are much more likely to get into trouble. This is so sad because they are so lonely. By preferring males, China has created a huge group of men who may have to live forever alone.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 1:43 PM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

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E. Erny-Newton's comment, March 21, 2013 9:43 AM
This is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.
E. Erny-Newton's comment, March 21, 2013 9:43 AM
For more on that, see : http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html
E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

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Iryl Bacdayan's comment, May 5, 2013 6:25 PM
For men who want to get married they have to "give" the bride a hefty price. They are expected to give them an apartment, a car, and then pay them a high amount of money.
Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:15 PM

This article makes an argument for having a girl rather than a boy in China. With all of the males, brides are in high demand. Their demands for gifts are also high, as they can be picky with so many grooms looking for husbands. Parents of boys must pay for the apartment for the couple as a wedding gift and this puts a heavy financial strain on the family, especially when there are multiple boys.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 11:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.

 

Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates.  Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I liked this story because it is about how food changes.  The original Chinese immigrants to America changed their food over time to adapt to American ingredients and tastes, now the owner of this restaurant who was a third generation Chinese-American has brought the cuisine back to China.  Where it is so different, there to the food that they are used to that it is something new.  I liked this article I felt it showed how things can change.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 10:19 AM

This NPR article is an excellent example of how migration and globalization affect food culture. The "Chinese Food" we think of in the United States is actually not what people eat in China. The food was modified significantly by Chinese immigrants to be more palatable for Americans and over time it became its own entity. Now, since there are enough Americans living in China, one restaurant owner is importing American-Chinese food back to China. This odd situation has Chinese people trying a foreign version of Chinese food.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 5:28 PM

American-Chinese food makes way towards the people of China. In America, favorites such as General Tso's is unheard of in China. So American Chef takes the American spin on things, using ingredients such as Heinz ketchup and Skippy peanut butter, to Shanghai, China even though doubted at first! However, Americans living in the area keep coming back!

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 12:52 PM

It is funny how Americans can actually be in China and miss “Chinese” foods from their hometown. The average person living in China does not eat American/Chinese foods such as General Tso’s chicken and fortune cookies. However, American’s visiting or living in China miss some of their favorite “Chinese” dishes from back home. Luckily, a new restaurant has opened in Shanghai to attract those people who are looking for the American style Chinese food.  

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Frontrunner in Afghan vote rules out coalition government | Reuters

Frontrunner in Afghan vote rules out coalition government | Reuters | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
KABUL (Reuters) - A frontrunner to succeed Hamid Karzai as Afghanistan's president voiced the possibility of teaming up with a rival on Wednesday but ruled out forming a coalition government in order to
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

After Afghanistan’s difficult past with war and tainted elections, it will be interesting to see how this election turns out.  Will they be able to peacefully transfer power, will the winner be announced after the voting or will a runoff be required.  This article discusses the different outcomes and explains why it takes so long for ballots to be counted in the mountainous country.

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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

McDonald’s is a company that is good at adjusting their brand to fit into the markets they are trying to enter.  This shows a positive side to globalization, in my opinion, because it shows that a large company is sensitive to the needs and wants of the place they are going into and is willing to find ways to adapt to the culture they are entering.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:17 AM

This is only one change McDonalds has had to make in order to have a sustainable market in India.  They obviously have not sold beef or pork pattied burgers at a high rate.  If they want to keep business booming in India than they need to keep showing the Indian people that they can innovate and provide the best service they can while also respecting the customs of their society.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:47 AM

At the very least Mcdonalds is changing its menu to fit the culture, rather than making the entire world eat Big Macs and Cheeseburgers. One would be surprised that many times you don't have to go too far to find variances in fast food menus. Some could say I was a "Big" fan of fast food when I was younger, and I remember the Taco Bell in Arizona selling different food than the one in Rhode Island. Or even Canadian KFCs offering Poutine when they won't right over the border in the US.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 11:21 PM

I believe this is a wise decision by McDonald's to adjust their menu for the people of India who are vegetarian. India's population is over one billion now; many of those people are vegetarian. McDonald's is one of the world's most successful fast food chains and they have a chance to lure millions of new customers into their restaurant. This is a great example of a global company making small changes in order to attract people with specific customs and cultural norms. 

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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Serge Dielens * Soci(et)al Marketing Communication expert @ EdgeCommunication.be *'s comment, May 7, 2013 2:55 PM
Visiter des bidonvilles, nouveau trend pour touristes en mal de nouveauté? Je me souviens avoir personnellement visité SOWETO en 2000, avec un groupe de journalistes belges. Nous avons logé chez une dame qui cédait une partie de sa maison pour se faire un peu d'argent, pour contribuer aux frais de ses deux fils étudiants à l'Unif. Ce fut une expérience inoubliable. Nous n'avons pas entendu le son de sa voix, elle nous servait à manger en silence et même si nous ne savions pas très bien comment réagir, nous avions l'impression que nous lui venions en aide, d'une manière ou d'une autre. En tous cas, la visite de ce bidonville fut pour moi éclairante.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:49 PM

This TV show is very different from something we would see here in the US. What was interesting was that the superhero in this video was fighting for education. The basis of the show was that the schools were shut down, and a superhero (a teacher) was trying to help the students and fight for education. This is a constant struggle for the people of Pakistan. They don't have education like we do. Their culture is much different than ours. We really take advantage of all the opportunities that we have in education. We don't need to have a "superhero" to save education in the US because we have education easily available to us, whereas the people in Pakistan do not. That is all they want. They want to learn new things and become educated. This TV show represents what the people of Pakistan want and want to fight for. I think ultimatley the show represents the culture they want and are fighting for. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:13 AM

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:40 PM

My geography class watched this. It is an interesting example of how different cultures can mesh together, such as the Burka Avenger and Wonder Woman. It is really interesting that the Burka Avenger is a school teacher by day, which shows how highly educators are thought of in the society.

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Maldives

Maldives | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This island country has a strange duality that is not uncommon for poor countries with beautiful natural resources like sandy beaches.  On one hand, it is a place with resorts, which cater to wealthy tourists that are kept separated from the inhabitants of the islands.  On the other hand, they are a poor Muslim society that relies on fishing and tourism for its economic growth.  The precarious nature of their low islands leaves them open to flooding and tsunamis. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 9, 2013 4:32 PM

The photos we viewed in class have inspired me to add this to the list of places to visit over the course of my lifetime. The accomplishment of building up such a small piece of land on this scale is somewhat rare and often reserved for megacities on the larger continents. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:53 PM

Maldives might be hard to keep for many years due to the fact that it is in the middle of the ocean. Eventually overtime the waves would ruin whatever is on that land. It does not seem like a pratical place to live. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 4:19 AM

The Maldives are an extremely interesting case of physical geography. They are made of coral and sands which the oceans have deposited on the coral skeleton of the islands. The ringed shape of the islands suggests there was once something in the center of the them which either receded into the ocean or eroded away leaving only the hardened coral rings behind.

 

Economically, the fairly unique nature of these tropical islands makes them an excellent tourist destination and Maldives has a significant tourist industry. Unfortunately, the unique physical geography of the islands makes them extremely vulnerable to tsunami and rising sea levels. If global warming raises the ocean levels a few feet, the majority of the islands will be flooded permanently.

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How Earth´s Orbital Shift Shaped the Sahara

How Earth´s Orbital Shift Shaped the Sahara | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
A change in the Earth´s orbit, many scientists believe, transformed the "Green Sahara" into what is now the largest desert on the planet. While scientists are still trying to find out if the slow shift in orbit had rapid or gradual environmental consequences, they say Earth´s orbit will continue to change today and into the future.
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

resource for Sahara presentation

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.


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fliter for region

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 23, 4:20 AM

useful for student directed projects

Renata Hill's comment, April 9, 5:47 PM
Congratulations on being featured as a curating "lord"! You're a rock star on Scoop.it and an inspiration to me!
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 9:38 AM

Overall great course resource

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U.S. Emerges as Central Stage in Asian Rivalry

U.S. Emerges as Central Stage in Asian Rivalry | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Experts say that both Japan and South Korea have the same goal: cajoling Washington into pressuring the other to make concessions in their bitter rivalry over history and geography.
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

South Korea and Japan have had a rocky past with each other steaming from WW II; the two countries are now battling for public opinion in the USA.  Events of the first half of the twentieth century are still affecting politics today and will most likely continue to do so for a long time to come.

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is disturbing to me.  These apartments are smaller than prison cells.  I find it awful that families have to squeezes into such small spaces.  I cannot imagine being able to live is such a small space without feeling trapped.  I felt trapped and claustrophobic just looking at the pictures!

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:42 PM

I understand that thiere is a high density population but having people live like this is unjust. It reminds me of a prison cell, I can't imagine more than one person living in this area. If places are becoming more and more pacaked, they shouldn't build places to fit more and more people like this. People still need there space.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 5:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 5:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 24, 2013 7:29 AM

It's no secret that Japan's population is aging and can not replace itself.  Since it is not a destination country for migrants, this is going to have serious economic ramifications as the percentage of the Japanese population over 60 is expected to rise above 40% over the course of this next generation.  Given the harsh statements by the new Japanese finance minister, it's a huge political concern (although a difficult one mention in campaigns).  Some have already questioned Japan's ability to survive this demographic implosion as adult diapers are now a bigger moneymaker in Japan than children's diapers.

 

Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia.

Greg Hill's curator insight, January 30, 2013 1:17 AM

Tell us how you really feel

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

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Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

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David Ricci's comment, April 30, 2013 9:47 AM
Japan clearly has their job cut out for them due to the geography of the country. Thier land has very limited airable land making agriculture extremely hard to maintain. The mountainous terrain also makes travel much harder for these people. Because of this their population like stated in the video has been pushed to hotspots like the yamato region. Japan has developed their culture solely based on how disconnected they are from the rest of the world. Japan is a chain of many islands so they have to import alot of their goods. This means having good trade partners, always making new trade partners, and avoiding conflict. This didnt work so well looking back at world war II. Unfortunately they must either become more self sufficient like chris said, or they have to stay on the good sides of alot of other countries.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

Well this is certainly one way of ‘solving’ their pollution problem.  Tourists upset, no problem, give them a backdrop to pose in front of.  I find this just crazy; rather than trying to clean up the air the government is instead covering over the problem.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:26 AM

If the pollution is getting worse in Hong Kong why is it not being addresed? What are the people in charge focusing on? To me pollution would be a very important thing to fix because it could cause deaths if it is not fixed and just continues to get worse. 

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:52 PM

While this is a kind of comical fascade for tourists, it draws attention to the insane amounts of pollution present in Hong Kong.  The ships that dock in one of the world's largest ports are a great contributor to the thick smog that hovers over the city in addition to the normal urban pollutants like traffic, smoking and industry.  Pollution is a major problem in all urban cities and government regulation needs to crack down on the subject because the dense smog that citizens are inhaling all day is slowly killing them. 

Pollution leads to various cancers and other health problems which in China may help decrease the population but it will cause many more problems than it will solve.  Hong Kong is an urban megacity center where thousands of corporations have their headquarters and important offices and pollution may get bad enough to drive certain companies out.  Pollution can also destroy the value of any raw goods that come from the areas or perhaps even poison certain factory made products. With smog this thick, the pollutants are everywhere and can do serious damage to the environement and those who inhabit it.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 5:45 PM

That is sick! Pollution is a major problem in Hong Kong due to its busy urban environment. However, setting up a fake skyline for tourists to pose in front of is not the solution. The solution is taking precautions and finding ways to cut back on the pollution so that the haze and pollution does not escalate.

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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video is great it shows how one person can make a difference.  The guy was able to bring skateboarding to Afghanistan and help children have an outlet for recreation that they previously did not have.

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Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 2:16 AM

Skateistan is an inspiring effort to give children in Afghanistan something to do other than work, give the girls some freedom before they come of age, and have cultures and classes come together to understand equality, even on such a small scale. The culture clash of skateboarding and traditional Afghan raised youth sounds corky at first but turns out to be a great project that challenges race, class, and gender.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 20, 10:09 PM

As a former skateboarder, I know of all the positives that can come from this extreme sport. When you are having a bad day, you can go skateboarding and forget it all for a short time. I am proud of the Australian man who introduced this sport to the suffering people of Afghanistan, in an attempt to make young people smile and have fun.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 4:00 PM

Skateistan is such an uplifting video of children of both sexes playing together in their early years prior to puberty. Skateistan is a skateboard park ran by an Australian man influencing sports and fun to the children of this area. There are not many places for children to play safely and Skateistan offers that and incorporates girls into having fun and staying healthy also. 

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India's displaced and disenfranchised

India's displaced and disenfranchised | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The third day of voting in India's general election is due to be one of the biggest but in one constituency, many people will not be casting their ballot.
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

India is the world’s largest democracy but the unrest between Muslims and Hindus that has occurred in recent years are disenfranchising the Muslim minority.  The people forced from their homes due to the recent unrest are now without their identifications need to vote and their names are not on the voting lists.  This will cause them to be even more underrepresented after the elections in the government and they will be further marginalized. 

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The rapid modernization of India along with the rural attitudes and male centric society makes it difficult for women who are raped to get justice.  Mostly because to come forward as a rape victim will take their honor away.  If they have to admit it happened then their lives will be ruined.  Even when their family stands behind them, the women are in fear and one almost killed herself because she felt pressured to testify.  The men who rape these women are from the small villages around the area and feel free to do as they please because they do not fear that their victims will report the abuse.  Things will not change until attitudes towards women and rape change in this area. 

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 13, 2013 7:53 PM

Times are changing in India, the country is becoming more western and adopting more western ideals, but change does not come all at once. In cities women are becoming educated and getting good jobs, but just outside there are still traditional rural areas. In these areas, women stay inside and sometimes cover their faces, and are obedient to the men around them. In the city, women go out at night and are more independent. This leads to problems because men of these villages will abuse and rape these independent women and will feel justified in their actions because there is no reason for a woman to be out unless they are a prostitute. Women try to gain independence and freedom, but are in danger because those around them still believe that they have no right and do not belong in the city, working.

   Also, these rape crimes go unpunished many times because rape in India makes a woman unpure and she becomes victimized and some women commit suicide after rape because of the stress that comes from the rape itself and from the society's view of her as a rape victim.

    Rape is a growing problem all over the world, with people disagreeing on the fundamental question of what qualifies as rape. However, in India it is a large problem because there are almost two societies because the country is changing and women do not know how to live in both societies, they can either have all of the freedom and independence, or none of it. They are gaining their self-independence and will soon get all of it, but some people are still trying to hold them back.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:20 AM

It hard to report rape cases even here in the US.  It must be ten fold that in places like India, and much of the middle east, where women traditionally in thse areas of the world as always been in a lower status of men.  The women for years, for generations in fact have always been told that their place in lower than that of men. That if something happened to them it must be their fault.  However with globalization and access to the world as a whole, women, and the men, of these societies have been shown that this is not what it is like in the rest of the world.  The women do not have to accept what they have been told even though it has been drilled into their head over and over.  With women in India inceasing their percentage in the workforce, and being education this extreme situation is going to slowly change.  There have been alot of negative aspects of globalization, this however may well be one of the postive aspects of globalization, especially to the women in the areas of the world where this type of behavior is all too common. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 4:47 PM

It appears the lifestyle of young educated women living in modern cities are quite different than the tradition villagers living in the countryside. As urban expansion is taking place, these two types of people are coming together. Unfortunately, the conservative villagers are raping some of the young modern women. Apparently the villagers typically do not see young women walk freely during the night, and as a result the men are mistreating and raping the women. 

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Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods

Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Tea plucking machines are threatening the livelihoods of tea pickers in the Indian state of Assam, reports Mark Tully.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I found it interesting that the estates choose to maintain a womb to tomb economy for their workers.  The cost they said was higher than in other tea producing models but they felt that it was something that safeguarded quality.  The introduction of machines would not only reduce quality but it would reduce the workforce, which would displace workers.  But this choice may be taken from them as younger workers leave to find work elsewhere. 

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:39 PM

Tea is the backbone of the Assam economy, their tradition is to hand pick the tea leaves making it expensive. In Assam some estates are running into the risk of having to begin to rely on machines to pick their tea. This is because of a shortage of willing workers. Another problem they are facing is that they are being beaten out because their tea is highly priced compared to other estates. This is a big threat to the Assam and something that there economy relies on so heavely.  

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 11, 2013 1:03 PM

To modernize or not?  A great question.  Young people don't want to do this traditional work, it is expensive for the owners while others are using machines, the quality may be better, but the other brands are cheaper and selling more.  They exports have dropped becuase of the price of cheaper teas that don't have the same quality, but it seems that price is the more determining factor.  What is the owner to do?  If he changes and sells more his quality goes down, and a ton of people lose their jobs, however with less and less people willing to do the work...is it even necessary to keep this way???  A vicious circle..I think so.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 4:42 AM

This article details how globalization is damaging the high-end tea industry of India. The Assam company, which produces high quality tea, is under pressure to mechanize their 100% human tea production due to competition. Vietnam, Kenya, and even other Indian companies produce significantly cheaper tea due to their willingness and ability to cut costs by using machines and paying their workers less. A cultural stigma toward tea workers is making hiring difficult for Assam, compounding the problems with competitors and forcing a switch to mechanization which will produce an inferior product.

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The video showed an interesting report on bootlegging in Pakistan.  The comment at the end was the most interesting to me.  A person interviewed said that the society used to be more open and free but now they are not.  The rich can do as they like but the people cannot.  The dangers of bootlegging is such that if the police catch you then you will be arrested or have to pay a bribe but if the Taliban catch you then you will be killed.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 6:47 PM

You should never force someone to do what you want and you cant stop them from doing what they want.  In the Muslim religion drinking is prohibited so observant Muslims will not drink regardless if its available.  If heroin was sold at gas stations in the United States tomorrow I wouldn’t go out and buy it.  It is important that people in positions of power give there society  the respect to make there own decisions the same way we respect the decisions of a president.  Prohibition didn’t work and our war on drugs has been putting massive amounts of money in the hands of criminals. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:34 PM

It is crazy to think that alcohol is illegal in Pakistan. In the US is so easily accessible that I never really thoughout about it in other places. In Pakistan it is illegal to sell or consume alcohol. However this doesn't mean that it is not there. Selling alcohol is a very risky business. Getting cuaght with alcohol at the very least ends in a $350 fine or a police bribe. However this the minimum punishment. Many bootleggers have been shot and killed trying to sneak the alcohol in. This is why the risk is so high and many people try to keep their bootlegging to a minimum. Many of the men get upset when they get big orders becuase it means that there is more of a chance to get caught.  They said a small buisness makes about $4,000 a year, which may seem small to us in the US, but it is 3 times the average salary in Pakistan. However there are some bootleggers who make up to $30,000. WIth this being said because alcohol is illegal and the business is so risky alcohol is not cheap, which means for the most part alcohol is mostly consumed and sold to the rich. However is it easy to find. Getting alcohol in Pakistan to bootleg was compared to ordering pizza in the US. But it comes at a price. It is amazing how their Islamic culture impacts them so much. One guy even said that he wouldn't tell his parents he drinks alcohol because in Islam it's basically considerd a sin. It is amazing how different things are. Throughout the video none of the men showed their faces, and were even scared that the camera was present. It is amazing to me how different things are in Pakistan, and that people risk their lives to sell alcohol. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:40 AM

Bootlegging is more of a class status issue, the rich want it and they buy more liquor than the lower, middle class. there religion says it is a sin to drink and everyone listens. 

I think it is crazy that they think drinking is compared to adultery. I think because we live in a society were drinking is a norm, most gatherings involve some kind of alcohol, whether it be toasting to a special occasion or grabbing a drink to catch up with an old friend. 

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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article point out the disadvantage Muslims face in India, especially in the lower rung of the economy, in order to gain employment they have to hide their faith and pretend to be something they are not Hindus.  The article also points out that a rise of nationalist groups has further marginalized the Indian Muslims.  This is a sad state of affairs as these people are kept in low status jobs because if they were to show their papers to get a better job they would be turned away.  Discrimination is a human problem that all countries struggle with.

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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:21 PM

I wonder if India will ever adopt any anti-discrimination legislation that will protect Muslims from prejudice. The partition of India and Pakistan was largely for religious, then political reasons, but the lived reality does not translate to all Muslims in Pakistan and all Hindus in India.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:02 AM

Hiding their idenity to get a job or to even live.  Much like many Jewish people did to survive in Hitler's Germany.  They pretened to be Catholic, Protestant anything but Jewish.  They did what they had to do to survive. The same is gong on in India, not on the scale of genocide, concentration camps, forced labor, etc., but it still is a form of opperession of a minority group in the largest "democracy" in the world.  It dates back to the partitiion of India after British rule.  Many Muslims were forced to migrated to what was then either West or East Pakistan, which is now Bangledesh.  Not all left.  There are about 127,000,000 Muslims in Indian manking it the second largest population of Muslims behind Indonesia, that is a sizeable minority even in a country of over 1 billion.  The nation overall would benefit from equality in the job maket in that there probably many skilled workers in a basically untouched labor pool.  The US has regulations against hiring practices based on one's religious belief, as well as age, gender, race etc., it is something that India might take an example from.  I know the US isn't perfect on its labor relations in the past, but we have been doing a good job as of late...though there are still lingering issues that will be solved giving time.  I tink its time for India to start becasue it will take a long time for things to change when they at least started.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 12:02 AM

This article is about Muslims in India masquerading as Hindu to get jobs. This is a little surprising considering how tolerant Hinduism is of other religions, but this is not so much a religious issue as much as it is a political issue. There is still a Hindu nationalist sentiment among many Indians dating back to the partition which is a part of why this religious discrimination exists.

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Concept

Concept | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

a presintationRevegetation and creation of green jobs through profitable production of food, freshwater, biofuels and electricity.

Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

resource for Sahara presentation. 

 

also this is a quite interesting idea.

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