Geography 200
Find tag "water"
104 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | Geography 200 |

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The Philippines which experiences monsoon weather is imperiled by the deforestation and clogged water ways due to increased population.  This country must do something to fix these issues or more large scale floods will likely be in its future.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 1:24 PM

For the second day in a row, the Philippines government has been forced to shut down all work, except for rescuers and disaster responders. Flooding has submerged more than half of the cities capital, Manila. Roads have turned to rivers and tens of thousands of people are trapped in homes and shelters. 7 deaths have been recorded so far. The capital holds 12 million people and more than 200 hundred evacuation centers have been opened. The monsoon that caused the floods is expected to travel north and cause havoc throughout the provinces surrounding Manila.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 11:03 PM

The area of Minila received more rainfall in day than it typically gets in a month.  Flights were delayed and cancelled, roads were turned into rivers.  Some of the thoughts of why this is happening are because of deforestation of mountains, clogged waterways and canals where large squatter communities live, and poor urban planning

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 6:44 AM

Flash flooding is probably the least understood natural disaster in the world. People often underestimate, how dangerous a flash flooding situation can become. The Philippines and South East Asia suffer from widespread monsoons. The regions fertile farmland is a result of the widespread heavy rainfall. A darker consequence of this phenomenon is the occurrence of dangerous flash flooding conditions. This particular rain in the Philippians was strong enough to submerge more than half of the capital underwater. The government in Manila has suspended all government operations that do not pertain to response and rescue missions. There will be major economic effects from this event. The loss of private property, and infrastructure such as roads will put a dent into the local economy.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

Jye Watson's curator insight, June 23, 2013 10:29 PM

year 7 water

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2014 5:23 PM

In Indonesia, many areas lack clean water. This makes it hard to keep residents healthy. World Vision Australia works with Indonesian towns to set up pipelines to the clean water sources to transport it to the areas of dirty water. This helps the villages work together and benefit off having clean water to drink and uncontaminated food. This improves life in Indonesia and they are very thankful for it.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2014 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | Geography 200 |
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article makes underscores the use of water resources in the area.  The need to make the deserts bloom is putting a strain on the ground water resources in this region.  Because of the climate, this water is not a renewable resource and will eventually dry up.  What type of chaos will that cause in 50 years when the estimated time of the resource runs its course?

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:52 AM

It's amazing to see how Saudi Arabia is able to transform an area once categorized by it's dryness and lack of vegetation is now being Terra-formed into a green area. This shows what huge amounts of money can do, physically alter the earth and landscapes. Because of the massive amounts of oil available to the Saudi's they are able to ship in a more valuable resource, water.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 6:51 PM

These satellite images provide some interesting perspective about the scarcity of water in Saudi Arabia. Due to rainfall totaling only about one inch a year, Saudi Arabia has been forced to drill for water trapped beneath the desert sand in order to sustain agriculture and life. The progression of the images shows that this water drilling has clearly done some good for Saudi Arabia in terms of green space, but scientists estimate that pumping water will only be a viable option for another 50 years or so, at which point, Saudi Arabia will be forced to explore other options for finding water. 


It is safe to say that many other countries around the world do not share the problem of finding water that Saudi Arabia does (though climate change has surely led to increased droughts in recent years).It puts into perspective, then, the universal struggle of the search for natural resources. In countries where water is in abundant supply, people are generally more concerned with securing oil or other means of energy creation. In a place like Saudi Arabia, however, which is incredibly rich in oil, people don't worry about energy, but about water. It just goes to show that we often don't appreciate what we have until it is put into perspective just how difficult it is for people who don't have what we do. Like the U.S. or China must do for oil and other energy resources, Saudi Arabia must find a viable option for securing water before it is too late. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 3:37 PM

More and more in the news, people have noticed that oil is the hot topic to discuss. Although oil is a very importance economic source, water is a resource that can sustain the population and keep people alive. Saudi Arabia over the years has developed a huge areas of green fields growing in areas of what is Saudi Arabias desert. Saudi Arabia reaches these underground rivers and lakes by drilling through the desert floor, directly irrigating the fields with a circular sprinkler system. This technique is called center-pivot irrigation. This is so important because even if the country has the money to buy resources like food and water, it is developing these agricultural fields which is allowing them to export products such as wheat, dates, dairy products, eggs, fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables and flowers to markets around the world. Saudi Arabia can now supply its people with these products that they use to import. This is extremely important to the current development in Saudi Arabia. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Geography 200 |
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This beautiful lake is a phenomenon the reason for its color is still unknown but it makes a very memorable lake!

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 11:54 AM

This article caught my eye because I have never seen a pink lake before. This lake is on Middle Island in Western Australia. The lake is 600 meters wide but the reasoning behind the color of it is still yet to be determined. White salt rims the lake and the color may be caused from a low nutrient concentration and even just bacteria. The pictures of this lake are beautiful and there is not anything like it. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next

A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next | Geography 200 |
Prof. Arnon Sofer sets out the link between drought, Assad’s civil war, and the wider strains in the Middle East; Jordan and Gaza are also in deep trouble, he warns

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article makes the connection between lower fresh water availability and war.  The argument that as water becomes scares, farmers leave their fields and head to the cities.  The cities are ill-equipped to handle the inflow of people and the greater demand on its water resources creating unrest and discontent.  This is an interesting way of looking at the conflicts in the area.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 11:25 AM

The article explains how population growth, climate change, drought, and water shortages could have contributed to the rise of war in Syria. This is an interesting interpretation, one which certainly could have been a contributing factor, but not all the Arab Spring can be attributed to water shortages so it is not a direct cause. The water shortages in Syria and a lack of government response certainly could have fanned flames which already existed due to an oppressive regime and regional conflicts. Climate change gets a lot of attention for the potential damage it could do to the environment, but I had not given much thought to the conflicts it could cause between nations and peoples.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:22 PM

Egypt may be the next country to be in deep trouble. With so many militant attacks coming out of Egypt to being with there is no surprise that the Middle East thinks it will be next on the list.

Pamela Hills's curator insight, July 18, 2014 8:37 AM

 A world at war and hot spots are growing with people caught in middle <3

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin

Freshwater Stores Shrank in Tigris-Euphrates Basin | Geography 200 |
An arid region grew even drier between 2003 and 2009 due to human consumption of water for drinking and agriculture.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The use of water is an increasing problem in the arid regions of the world.  The use of more sophisticated irrigation systems allow for more planting which requires more water.  Coupled with increasing towns and cities needing fresh water for the inhabitants this decrease in fresh water will only continue to trend.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:52 PM

What's happening in the Tigris-Euphrates Basin is similar to what is happening to the Aral Sea. Freshwater Stores Shrank in just 4 years. Humans are drastically altering the landscape and if we don't start to find others ways of doing things and change the way in which we do agriculture and use our water, there could be a serious water shortage for millions of people.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 22, 2014 6:24 PM

(Southwest Asia topic 2)

The area known as the Cradle of Humanity is becoming less hospitable. Though natural climate change can be attributed to the dryer conditions, humans have made just as much of an impact. Increased water usage leads to less reserve. Impacts stretch further, however. Less water flow below the dam can lead to changes in sedimentation patterns and disrupt wildlife habitats, potentially causing harm to wildlife.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 25, 2:09 PM

Similar to the Aral Sea,  the Tigris and Euphrates river basins have become drier and drier between 2003 and 2009. It is important to see all the aspects that have caused the rive to dry out and its do to there own people in this region. About 60 percent of the loss was attributed to the pumping of groundwater from underground reservoirs. Most of the problems are due to that about one-fifth of the water losses came from snowpack shrinking and soil drying up, partly in response to a 2007 drought. These could be some of the environmental issues but also there has been tremendous population increases in this region. This water is perfect drinking water for the people of South East Asia and the countries surrounding it but numbers are extremely high. 

It is important to analyze how us humans can change the geography of a certain area in such little time. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East

NASA Satellites Find Freshwater Losses in Middle East | Geography 200 |
A new study using data from a pair of gravity-measuring NASA satellites finds that large parts of the arid Middle East region lost freshwater reserves rapidly during the past decade.


"[This] data show an alarming rate of decrease in total water storage in the Tigris and Euphrates river basins, which currently have the second fastest rate of groundwater storage loss on Earth, after India," said Jay Famiglietti, principal investigator of the study and a hydrologist and professor at UC Irvine. "The rate was especially striking after the 2007 drought. Meanwhile, demand for freshwater continues to rise, and the region does not coordinate its water management because of different interpretations of international laws."


Tags: water, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, Middle East, Iraq.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

Water is a big issue in an arid area.  The fact that we can measure the amount of groundwater present in an area with a satellite is amazing to me.  The issue of water rights and control in this region will someday over take that of oil rights and use in my opinion.  Once people get used to free flowing water to use on demand it will cause problems politically when these sources of ground water inevitably dry up.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:00 PM

This is a perfect example of geospatial technologies can lead to a better understanding of how the Earth's physical systems are changing because of human geography.  Teaching geography is about showing how these systems are interconnected.   

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Geography 200 |

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.


This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   


Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 14, 2014 7:18 AM

This map shows a number of disputed islands off the coast of East Asia. These ownership of these islands would allow countries to extend their territory further into the ocean and grant them rights to any resources which may be under the ocean waters nearby. This political issue is one which driven by economics. Though the claims on these islands are not currently worth fighting over, if significant resources are found they could be, and a more powerful nation like China could flex military muscle to solidify their claim and other claimants would have to back down.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2014 6:20 PM

This interactive map discusses the current disputes between the islands and why the land is being disputed. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.