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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Regional Geography
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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 7:33 PM

Globalization makes amazing hybrid cultures. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

chris tobin's curator insight, February 6, 11:12 AM

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Sustainable Urbanism

"Jaime Lerner reinvented urban space in his native Curitiba, Brazil. Along the way, he changed the way city planners worldwide see what’s possible in the metropolitan landscape.  From building opera houses with wire to mapping the connection between the automobile and your mother-in-law, Jaime Lerner delights in discovering eccentric solutions to vexing urban problems. In the process he has transformed the face of cities worldwide."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video is enlightening.  The speaker uses the city as a model for fixing problems in the world.  Instead of seeing the city as an enemy to environmentalism, he purposes changing the cities and reworking old sites like quarries into something that is useable today.  He also advocates the integration of the transportation systems to make commuting more feasible as well as less pollution generating. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 8:02 AM

Jaime Lerner does not see cities as the problem; he sees urbanism as the solution to many global problems.  This video outlines practical plans to rethink the city to be more sustainable.  Click here to see the trailer for a documentary about the urban changes in Curitiba, Brazil. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Understanding a Rhode Island Accent

Mark Colozzi of Ocean State Follies translates Rhode Islandese. I recorded most of Charlie Hall's Ocean State Follies performance at Rhode Island College (Oc...

 

This provides a humorous look at a regionally distinct accent and way of speaking from the city I live in, Cranston, RI. This might be tough to follow for some non-Rhode Islanders since many local places, stores and institutions referenced as deeply local. 

 

(As a side note, this version was performed on my college campus and I'm actually in the background of the video since I was running the book sale as a fundraiser for the Shinn Study Abroad Committee. At the 2:30 mark, I'm the guy in the green shirt behind the Cranston sign)


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This funny video highlights how phonetically different words are in different dialects.  This is focused on the sound of the Rhode Island accent and it was interesting to see how the words were spelled when written phonetically.

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John Peterson's comment, February 2, 2012 5:13 PM
Sadly this is a very good representation of a true Rhode Island accent, speaking from past experiences with my own family.
Em Marin's comment, February 2, 2012 5:27 PM
he used to teach in my highschool
Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, September 25, 7:48 PM

Things only Rhode Islander's would say....... or understand.I have never seen this routine in it's entirety but it is actually quite funny.

P.S.D.S.( pierced ears) hilarious we all say these words or know someone who does.I think it's always fun when we can poke fun at ourselves. I hope the Ocean State Follies makes a return trip to Rhode Island College.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video available. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Time to scrap “Eastern Europe”

Time to scrap “Eastern Europe” | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Europe’s divisions are indeed grave. But counting the ex-communist countries as a single category is outdated and damaging 

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video makes a good point about where we arbitrarily draw lines on a map.  He uses different groupings to show how silly this can be.  His point is that Eastern Europe no longer really exists and we should no longer use the term.  He then suggests a few different terms to use to group countries in Europe.  My favorite was the grouping called Scared of Russia.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:23 PM

This video was insightful because it can be really challenging to classify a region in certain parts of the world. Having a simple eastern and western Europe made a tiny amount of sense at the time of WWII but it hasn't made any sense since then.  The boundaries in the southeastern part of Europe have changed on more than one occasion over the past 70 years and there are still border disputes between religious and ethnic groups that could result in new countries any day.  I found the narrator's ideas funny but still better than the traditional region that already exist.  

I personally group regions by the types of people that live in them and share very similar characteristics. Grouping parts of Europe is very hard because of the major cultural differences all over and because I am not highly educated on all of them.  I find it hard to consider Greece a part of Europe at times but it is also hard to consider it a part of anywhere else.  The countries that border Russia all seem similar to me because I don't have extensive knowledge of their cultures, although it is unfair that they are assumed to be completely impoverished countries. 

With the constantly shifting boundaries and movement of people, Europe is very hard to group into regions and that is okay because regions do not have huge effects on the way the world is run, they only make it easier to break down into pieces.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 7:17 AM

This video shows how difficult it is to categorize and group regions together. We tend categorize Eastern Europe as a group due to former political affiliations with the Soviet Union, but this is unfair as these nations are varied ethnically, economically, and politically. Plus, most, if not all, of these nations resented Soviet rule and grouping them due to it is somewhat insulting. Other groupings are not as neat on a map. For example, grouping Europe economically shows a couple Eastern European countries in the upper half and a number of Western European countries like Italy, Spain, and Greece in the lower half.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 10:29 PM

(Europe topic 4)

Should the term "Eastern Europe" be done away with? My opinion is yes *and* no. Being such a politically-influenced term (e.g. the Soviet Union) and that many of these countries have changed greatly since the days of the Soviet Union, avoiding the term would help to lesson discrimination of the region. However, my partial "yes" coms from the fact that these countries are still a part of the European continent and comprise its eastern half. So in a strictly geo-relational way I see nothing wrong with the use of this term. Avoiding it completely could just lead to unnecessary confusion.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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The true cost of oil

TED Talks What does environmental devastation actually look like? At TEDxVictoria, photographer Garth Lenz shares shocking photos of the Alberta Tar Sands mining project -- and the beautiful (and vital) ecosystems under threat.

 

This is a visually stunning portrayal of Canadian landscapes.   He shows incredibly gorgeous photographs of the ecosystems of the boreal forest, indigenous cultural landscapes and natural scenery.  This is unfortunately the backdrop for the impacts of industrial extraction of oil from the tar sands of the Athabasca in Canada.  Collectively, this makes for a jarring justaposition of environmental landscapes.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This presentation is very moving on the emotional side of the plight of Canada’s natural resources.  When it comes to oil production no matter where it is it will be dirty, messy and fraught with problems that impact the environment.  The idea that everyone wants oil but they don’t want to mess up their own country to get it is an interesting problem.  Frankly the more developed countries like Canada are more likely to mine the resources responsibly then a country that has little or no environmental protections.  This speaker gives a very impassioned presentation but he offers no alternatives to oil.  Getting oil from a country that has environmental protection laws is cleaner and better then getting it from a country that cares nothing for the environment; it is less accountable and more environmentally damaging to get it from somewhere else.  Pipelines are cleaner ways of moving oil as they seldom leak and don’t crash and spill.  The debate over oil and environmental responsibility will continue until a viable source of clean energy is created. 

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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video is great it shows how one person can make a difference.  The guy was able to bring skateboarding to Afghanistan and help children have an outlet for recreation that they previously did not have.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 7:39 PM

This video is a great example of globalization and how cultures can cross paths.  In this case, many kids are embracing the idea of skateboarding.  Not all, however are so accepting of Western ideas.  The Australian man who created this "Skateistan" is doing something groundbreaking for those living in this part of the world.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 6:49 PM

(Central Asia topic 2)

This video illustrates how a positive impact is being made in an oftentimes negative and bleak part of the world. Though some may scrutinize it as too small-scale or westernization, I believe this is a great starting point for the causes of promoting opportunity, getting kids 'off the streets', and as an example of how boundaries can be crossed beneficially. It seems wise for embassies to invest in projects such as this in the same way that police in South America are asked to provide community service to the areas they serve: the stigma of 'the other' and irrational fears can be done away with and allow people such as the Afghans to more effectively have their problems solved from the inside out.

In addition, issues of cultural and religious restrictions, such as those on women, may have voices gaining ground that will help adapt them to a more equal-gendered, modern world.

 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 1:25 PM

This is an inspirational video it is very powerful to see someone trying to make life better. The young Australian man that has created this program should be applauded. Watching this video you can tell that this simple gesture brings so much joy to these children. One feeling that comes to mind is yes countries can seem different but they can also seem familiar. These children are just like any others they want to play and have fun. I think this is a wonderful program for them to help them forget about the dangerous world they live in.