Geography 200
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Geography 200 |

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."


Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:16 PM

I feel as though marriage can be complicated in China due to the one child policy. The amount of males outweigh the females. Therefore, there will not be as many marriages because there are not enough females to go around. Grooms have to put out so much for their brides. For example, in this article, her groom is unable to even get in the room to see her unless he puts up a chunk of money first. This is a typical ordeal for Chinese weddings. People describe it as a negotiation process. He must do whatever is told of him before seeking her hand in marriage. The "bride price" is when the groom gives the brides family a fair amount of money. A typical amount for an ordinary family to give is around $10,000. This is so much to get married and on top of all this, gender roles are typically unbalanced. In order to get married in China, you best make sure your a man ready to fulfill every request of your bride.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 5:53 PM

I always heard that men were more desirable in China because they are the ones that carry out the family name and provide for the family. Women, however, are seen as much weaker and are treated as lesser. For the newly wed couple in the article, they hope to have a baby girl because it is much cheaper when she gets married. I never thought of it this way but having a girl would be much cheaper as the parents would not have to pay the "bride price" or for the apartment in which their daughter will be living in. 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 27, 12:48 AM

Unit 3


Cultural Practices

Cultural practuces in China are changing, but old customs are staying the dame. An old tradition is still being help up, called the "bride price.;This is a price that men must pay in order to marry. In China the male to female ratio is vey off, with 117 men to every 100 women.


Women are still being given a price on their head. It's a little different than it is in America.The culture behind the bride price is still going on in China and with China's ways of remembering traditions. China is a very traditional place with cultures following old traditions. The One Child policy, resulting in many males compared to females, and the strong traditions in China all result in why their customs stay for so long. 

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography 200 |
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 1:43 PM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 20, 2014 9:22 AM

The one child policy coupled with a traditionally patriarchal society has created a major problem in China in regards to men finding a wife. The preference towards having a baby boy over having a baby girl has led to abortions and infanticide in order to secure a male child. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a severely larger male population. In China's growing economically aware society, women have all the power to ultimately chose their spouse, often times considering wealth and status over any other characteristics. In a way, the power and fate of China has shifted to the women of marrying age while millions of poorer, working class men are left to live their lives unmarried and alone.  


Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:42 PM

The more well off Chinese males are more apt to get with woman. Due to the gender imbalance caused by the one child policy of China, it is harder for the men who are born into less fortunate families to get married and that will cause them to lose out on love.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I found this video disturbing.  Maybe because we have train safety taught to us were they stress that you need to stay away from the tracks, here the people are sitting next to a train track and even have goods for sale that the train drives over.  I think it is interesting how they reclaim the space but the mom in me worries about kids getting run over by the train.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 9:15 PM

On the one hand this disturbed me. All I kept thinking when I saw the people go back on the tracks is that they could easily be killed.In fact, I wonder how many accidents have ever occurred near this area. All it would take is some sort of malfunction on the train in which the horn wasn’t sounding to provide ample warning or someone gets in another person’s way so there isn’t enough time to close down the shop. On the other hand, this made me realize just how efficient a population could become at using space. Everything was timed so that the entire area moved out of the way without an issue. So rather than let any land go to waste, the area uses it despite the risk to its population. Though it really isn't like the population has a choice though. So in instances where there is such overpopulation, it is interesting to see how well the society can adapt to the phenomenon. I do wonder what would happen if the country becomes more developed and the population declines. Would this type of land continue in the future or be disband? I know that in our country there are many laws that would make this illegal, but our country also has the space avoid developing the land in such a manner. When comparing it to the laws of the United States, I would think the country would eventually drift away from this use of land when possible. However, now that I watch the video, I have a new appreciation for maximizing land and I hope that the efficient could continue. Just in a less scary manner. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:51 PM

Talk about using every inch of space available to you.  I find this video crazy not only because of the safety hazards, but just how people seem to go about this like it is normal.  This would never take place in America!

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 1:29 PM

An absolute amazing dynamic is seen in this video.  To say that Bangkok is trying to use most of its open space up would be an understatement.  In developed countries, you would not only never see this happen but you would not even see a thought of doing something like this.  There are violations every where you look.  

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Japan's Geographic Challenge

Stratfor examines Japan's primary geographic challenge of sustaining its large population with little arable land and few natural resources. For more analysi...

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This short video did a great job in explaining why Japan became expansionist in the decades leading up to WW II.  The mountainous nature of the islands and lack of arable land challenges Japan to provide food for its people.  To understand Japan you must understand her geography, this helps to understand why a country acted the way it did in the past and can be a predictor of future actions. 

David Ricci's comment, April 30, 2013 9:47 AM
Japan clearly has their job cut out for them due to the geography of the country. Thier land has very limited airable land making agriculture extremely hard to maintain. The mountainous terrain also makes travel much harder for these people. Because of this their population like stated in the video has been pushed to hotspots like the yamato region. Japan has developed their culture solely based on how disconnected they are from the rest of the world. Japan is a chain of many islands so they have to import alot of their goods. This means having good trade partners, always making new trade partners, and avoiding conflict. This didnt work so well looking back at world war II. Unfortunately they must either become more self sufficient like chris said, or they have to stay on the good sides of alot of other countries.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
Unlike other larger, more geographically diverse countries, Japan is faced with the problem of a general lack of farmable land and natural resources. The fact that the country is itself an island does not make things any easier for it in an economic sense. The way the country is divided up also makes for a difficult political situation, as mountain ranges create division, and therefore, political disunity.
The proximity of the Korean peninsula and China to Japan is also important to examine. Whenever Japan wishes to acquire natural resources and other economically beneficial materials, Korea is the conduit through which Japan tends to invade the mainland, usually China. Because of this, we can see how Japan’s geographic location may cause strained relationships with its neighbors, both politically and economically. Alienating two of its closest neighbors would clearly be a disastrous move for Japan, but it may be seen as necessary due to its unfortunate geographic location.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:31 PM

It would make sense to me that for a place like Japan to sustain itself successfully, it would have to have some help from other areas with more resources.  Again with the concept- people don't choose to be born, or where they are born... To be born in Japan is as unchosen by that person as it would be in any other country.  I don't think people should have to pay for resources that they do not have available, especially because they are on an island/island chain that simply doesn't have what they need.  I am really repulsed by the bartering system because of absolute indication of beyond excessive surplus and profit and greed and all that garbage that humanity reeks of.  Yeah some people are happy, but we could be completely unburdened of all negativity if we banded together to rid the world of negativity itself.  I know that Japan would be happy to receive everything that they need for no cost, but I also know that many people would be willing to work, and more willing to work, if they didn't have expenses to pay for... it would really be serving their life's purpose as a component of humankind if they worked to help others, rather than to pay their monthly rent.  I don't have a clue how I would go about organizing a movement to transform this idea into a reality, but I'll work on that.  In the mean time, I would advise supranationalism for Japan, and hope that with the alliance of other countries, they can band together and make deals that work for the greater good of their country, population, and the world.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education!

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Geography 200 |
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

Greg Hill's curator insight, January 30, 2013 1:17 AM

Tell us how you really feel

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, Today, 6:41 AM

What this government minister said is repugnant, but his comments strike directly at the most serious issue facing Japan. The Japanese population has become to old to sustain itself. Their are not enough younger people in Japan to sustain future generations of Japanese society. When a society fails to reproduce, it dies out. Japan may be facing extinction in a few generations to come. The increased strain on the government of Japan, will eventually kill it. A state can not support a majority elderly population. The coasts of medical care would drown the government in debt and financial ruin. Many European nations are facing a similar demographic time bomb. If this problem is not corrected, there is a good chance that both European and Japanese society will die out.