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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article describes the practice of Lenin and Stalin of Russifacation.  This policy led to many ethnic minorities with in the Soviet Union being deported from their home soil to the interior of Russia.  The aim was to place ethnic Russian in boarder areas and to bring the ‘undesirable’ ethnicity into the interior to become Russian or sent to the gulags to die.  The effects of this mass relocation of ethnicity is still being felt today.  The rising conflict in Ukraine is a direct result from these policies as the country is split between ethnic Ukraine and the decedents of the ethnic Russians move there to secure the ports to the Black Sea.

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Emma Boyle's curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:48 AM

Kyra - for your project.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:43 AM

Stalin probably did not have the outlook of his country's geography in mind when he deported all of these people.  It goes to show that ruthless dictatorships are never the way to go, as impulsive decisions and tyranny can have consequences for the long term.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 1:09 AM

This article details the ethnic deportation of peoples during the Soviet era. Many peoples were relocated under the guise of creating an ethnically unified Soviet Union but the truth was while some of the deportations were to simply move workers places of planned industry, many were to exile those deemed enemies of the state. The article estimates over 40% of those relocated died of diseases, malnutrition, or mistreatment. These forced migrations changed the demographics of Eastern Europe and Asia while causing major conflicts between various ethnic groups and Russia.

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Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate

Canada: As immigration booms, ethnic enclaves swell and segregate | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
More than 600 newcomers per day have arrived in Canada since 2006, and many of them have settled in neighbourhoods like Richmond, B.C.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article was interesting because it showed how modern immigration patterns are not that dissimilar from historic patterns.  People come to a new country and they settle in an area that has relatives or familiar people already living there.  The formation of ethnic enclaves is the example.  People are choosing to self-segregate when they immigrate to a new homeland because it is the familiar with in the strange.  Perhaps once the new immigrants have acclimated to Canadian society they may move out of the enclave areas but they also may stay.  It is an interesting example of how people cluster together with similar people when they move to a new country.

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Ju Hui Judy Han's curator insight, January 7, 2013 12:18 AM

Quoted in the article is Mr. Beasley, director of planning for the City of Toronto: “Ethnic neighbourhoods are a joy when you have them, and it’s a joy when you don’t have to have them." When you don't HAVE TO have ethnic communities? Huh.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:15 PM

It is amazing that over 600 people come into Canada a day and settle into areas that used to be quite little farming land. These areas are now home to North Americas second largest Asian communities. Canada now has 260 ethnic enclave neighborhoods and they are an important part of Canadas landscape. They are mostly moving into the suburbs where land is cheaper and in my opinion I think they are moving there for job and because they concider it safer. They are also closing down the business of the families that have been their forever and cant compete like the greek families.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 24, 1:15 PM

This article contains details about the Canadian immigrant population boom, mostly from east Asia, which began in the 90's. Unsurprisingly, many of these immigrants settle into communities with others whom share their culture. These Canadian ethnic enclaves differ from those in the US because most immigrants are choosing suburban areas (where the cost of living is lower) rather than being relegated to an urban "ethnictown." However, these enclaves are not entirely a product of economic equality as the average earnings for a recent immigrant are only 61% of a Canadian-born worker, limiting their ability to move elsewhere.

 

Conversely, the immigrant communities which become economically successful are seeing many of their sons and daughters move away to the city or other suburbs as they are more fully integrated into the Canadian culture and if there is no influx of new immigrants into these enclaves they begin to die out. This seems to indicate that long-standing ethnic enclaves are at least partially the product of economic inequality than a desire to preserve culture.

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article was interesting as it shows that the problems faced in the United States due to immigration are not unique.  The friction between old and new immigration seems to be universal.  How different counties handle and adapt to the changing demographics of their people is challenging and shows the character of the population.  I was unaware of the makeup of Belize’s population or that they were an English speaking country.  This article told me a lot about the people of this country. 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 25, 2013 10:51 PM

As a former British territory English is the main language for now.  Because of the country's success in harsh economic times immigration to this country is increasing, which is chaning the demographics.  Spanish is now growing in importance as immigrants from Gutaemala, Honduras and El Salvador enter Belize. These immigrants are supplying the cheap labor to work in the sugar and banana platations in the outlying areas, while others are working in the oil export industry and the growing tourism industry.  Much like the migrant workers that come to the US to work in agriculture, the immigrants to Belize are taking the low paying, but labor intensive, jobs that some people that do just not want to do.  One thing I found ironic, politicians "buying" votes to the new growing immigrant population...sound familiar??

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 11, 1:24 PM

Belize is surrounded by nations much less well-off than they are themselves, which makes them attractive for migrants.  This is greatly changing the cultural make-up of this resource-rich, coastal country.  Fortunately, the countries inhabitants are welcoming to the newcomers and ethnic differences are not seen negative.  However, the large influx of culturally different people are creating issues that the present working-generation has to deal with, especially land availability and job opportunities in an increasingly Spanish-speaking market.  If Belizeans can maintain their positive views of those different then them, they will hopefully adapt to these changes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 1:48 PM

Accents are a part of life. They can be developed over time for many reasons. Belize is a country full of immigrants and constant migration. Once upon a time, Belize may have spoken Spanish.Languages are developed every day within countries. Belize happens to be an English speaking country with a Spanish accent. No surprise there.

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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

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Rising Anti-Immigration Sentiment in the EU

Stratfor Europe Analyst Adriano Bosoni discusses the political implications of the increasing number of migrants from the European Union's periphery to its c...

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video describes the increase in immigration into EU countries from other EU countries.  The EU agreements on free movement are being challenged in countries that feel rightly or wrongly that the immigrants coming in are a drain on their economies during this difficult economic time.  It is interesting to see how Europe deals with this immigration issue compared to how America deals with its immigration issues.

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shawn Giblin's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:41 AM

Its funny to see that anti-immigration is starting to be a trend around the world first the united states and now europe.I dont agree with illegal immigration but legal mirgartion should  not be a problem.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 12:26 PM

This looks just like the arguments in the US about the immigration issue here.  These seem to be be more of legal immigration, as well as illegal to some extent,  as to illegal immigration in the US.  The governments of some of the EU nations need this population in order to fill the workers shortage that has been fuled by low birth rates.  In the US its a little deffernt form of immigration.  Here many illegal immigrants are taking the much lower wage jobs and working in cash with no taxes, ie mirgrant farmers.  Well we want cheap food, that is the way the farm owners are doing it.  In Europe it seems that they are taking some jobs, but I assune since it is legal immigration they are paying some sort of tax on their wages.  These immigrants are from other EU countries for the most part.  Under the EU treaty it is legal for them to live and work in any member nation.  This shows the problem with supranational organizations, a country will lose some of its autonomy in these types of organizations.  For example, can the UK limit the number of people allowed into its country, or even limit access to their health care system under EU law?  If they do, what can the EU do to the UK?  Looks like a fight is about to start!

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:53 AM

Like America, Western Europe is facing the troubles of immigration for jobs. COuntries in Europe, such as Eastern countries of Bulgaria and the P.I.G.S. are moving to core countries in search of work that the cannot find in their own land. The problem becomes a matter of the core country citizens not having jobs for themselves as their economy joins other in slowing down. Racial tensions are rising because of this. Ironically, the video generalizes the anti-immigration as just anti-immigrants but as images in the video would suggest, much of the sentiments are towards Muslim immigrants.

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The rapid modernization of India along with the rural attitudes and male centric society makes it difficult for women who are raped to get justice.  Mostly because to come forward as a rape victim will take their honor away.  If they have to admit it happened then their lives will be ruined.  Even when their family stands behind them, the women are in fear and one almost killed herself because she felt pressured to testify.  The men who rape these women are from the small villages around the area and feel free to do as they please because they do not fear that their victims will report the abuse.  Things will not change until attitudes towards women and rape change in this area. 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 4:47 PM

It appears the lifestyle of young educated women living in modern cities are quite different than the tradition villagers living in the countryside. As urban expansion is taking place, these two types of people are coming together. Unfortunately, the conservative villagers are raping some of the young modern women. Apparently the villagers typically do not see young women walk freely during the night, and as a result the men are mistreating and raping the women. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

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Migrants’ New Paths Reshaping Latin America

Migrants’ New Paths Reshaping Latin America | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
In Mexico and Latin America, old migratory patterns are changing as migrants move to a wider range of cities and countries, creating regional challenges and opportunities.

 

Diffusion and patterns of migration are by their nature, going to be fluctuating.  Whether and why people stay or go, has profound impacts on the human geographic landscape of a variety of regions.  With less Latin American migrants coming to the United States and the Maquiladora zone of Northern Mexico, this has allowed southern Mexico and other countries to reap the benefits of maintaining portions of their most educated and entrepreneurial population. 


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article points out how when the pattern of immigration shifts it creates new challenges for the country of immigration, even if it is internal migration as opposed to external migration.  The path and flow of people moving from place to place can change the shape and nature of a country.  

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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:10 AM

My insight on this would be how that Latin American countries have more educated people than other countries, then they spread to surrounding counties, providing many challenges and opportunities. Some opportunities would be that speading education would bring jobs. And the challenges would be the issue of mixing diversities, which could cause stds and gene mutations.- walker