Geography 200
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I liked this site; it gives a good interactive map of the area showing the paths that the pirates took.  It could be a good teaching tool for a classroom learning about the era of the Caribbean pirates and also teaching kids the geography of the area in a way that would be fun for them.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 9:34 AM

Imagine the horror a native of the Caribbean must have felt when white men came into their scenic lands and pillaged their villages and plundered their treasuries? Blackbeard otherwise known as Edward Teach, would light slow burning cannon fuses and place them in his beard to create an aura about him as he fought and raided these port of call. Calico Jack Rackham, a great pirate name if there ever was one, was best known for having  a pair of female pirates aboard. Instantly becomes one of my heroes! Then you have William Parker who was actually an opportunist backed by England who plundered Spanish treasures throughout Central America. Here is my favorite pirate joke; what is a pirate's favorite letter? "R" you say? No, it's the letter "C", pirates love the sea....

Helen Teague's curator insight, September 14, 2015 9:28 AM

very interesting interactive map

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Chicago on the Eve of the Great Fire

Chicago on the Eve of the Great Fire | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
This 1868 pocket map of Chicago shows the city in full-blown expansion, a mere 3 years before the infamous blaze

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This map is cool.  It lets you compare the old map to the new map by moving a lens around the satellite map.  It is a great interactive tool to compare old and new and allows the viewer to see how much the geography of the city has changed in the last 150 years or so.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2013 12:35 PM

This interactive map with a 'spyglass' feature.  Chicago is displaced during a economic boom period as the U.S. was expanding westward.  Where where the railroads located then?  Why have some of them vanished today?  Notice anything curious about the coastline along Lake Michigan?  Follow this link to see similar interactives of other major U.S. cities.


Tags: Chicago, historical

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 11:07 AM

An interesting map which shows the difference between present day Chicago and 1868 Chicago. It illustrates what a dramatic transformation the city has undergone in the last 150 years. The trains and their tracks, which were such an important part of 1800's travel and logistics, were all removed and replaced with roads for automobiles. Lake Michigan was filled in approximately 1000 feet to expand the city to the east. Where Soldier Field now sits, was once roughly 150 feet into Lake Michigan. To the west, the 1868 map shows large squares of undeveloped city which is today subdivided into entire neighborhoods. Yet, while there are a lot of differences, it's surprising how much is still the same. Much of the developed part of 1868 Chicago has the same layout as today. The buildings may have changed, but the locations of buildings and streets are the same as they were then, a likely product of inertia since it would take more effort to restructure the city than renovate it.

A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 24, 2014 10:09 PM

This map is truly revealing of how far Chicago has progressed!