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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I find it interesting to see where certain languages become dominant for business use.  This infographic is very interesting and useful in determining different trends in both the spread of language and the historical factors that spread these languages in this region.

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Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:30 PM

It's interesting to see years after colonialism and imperialism there the nations it colonized are still having contact with their 'mother country'. For example the countries of Angola and Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau gained independence in the 1970's and they still trade with Portugal and are dependent on one an other to an extent, and language definitely has something to do with it.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:46 PM

Africa is a huge continent filled with tons of countries. Language is widespread even within a city or town. Throughout Africa, there is no denying that the languages vary drastically. All the languages however are among the most spoken languages in the world. More business for Africa!

The ServiceMag's curator insight, September 9, 12:30 PM

The 'Other' category is much underestimated. Therefore, incorrect!

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Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth?

Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth? | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews and Christians call it the Temple Mount." 

 

What happens when various religious groups claim the same territory as their own?


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article and picture points out just how hard it is to “solve” the problems in Israel.  The constant overlapping of buildings on holy sites complicates the issues more than anything political ever could.  Belief is one of the biggest driving forces for conflict in the world and this illustration reminds us of that.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 5:38 AM

This site means so much to the Abrahamic religions. Currently the the real estate is mostly contested by Muslims and Jews. There are so many strong feelings that war can break out any time because of The Temple mount. What is left is to wait and see what happens from a poltical statement or even a biblical prophecy stand point. Those who believe in God should beleive that one day true peace will exist in this contested area. Right now with Netanyahu and other leaders a battle is waging for true ownership of the land. As years progress treaties and ceasefires are always modified to soothe the tension that exists in these areas.

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 10, 9:08 AM

#Jerusalem

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 1:54 PM

In some of the oldest civilizations on earth, religion is the most important aspect of life. There will always be extreme conflicts in these ancient areas all over religion.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:49 PM

This TV show is very different from something we would see here in the US. What was interesting was that the superhero in this video was fighting for education. The basis of the show was that the schools were shut down, and a superhero (a teacher) was trying to help the students and fight for education. This is a constant struggle for the people of Pakistan. They don't have education like we do. Their culture is much different than ours. We really take advantage of all the opportunities that we have in education. We don't need to have a "superhero" to save education in the US because we have education easily available to us, whereas the people in Pakistan do not. That is all they want. They want to learn new things and become educated. This TV show represents what the people of Pakistan want and want to fight for. I think ultimatley the show represents the culture they want and are fighting for. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:13 AM

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:40 PM

My geography class watched this. It is an interesting example of how different cultures can mesh together, such as the Burka Avenger and Wonder Woman. It is really interesting that the Burka Avenger is a school teacher by day, which shows how highly educators are thought of in the society.

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article is interesting as it shows a cultural difference that leads the people of Bolivia to choose traditional food and food vendors over the corporate model like McDonald’s.  This shows that people in small countries can fight against globalization if the majority of the people choose not to spend money in globalized businesses.  It also shows the strength of the Bolivia people’s commitment to their cultural ways. 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 6:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 4:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 9:41 AM

       It's interesting that globalization is one of the reasons for the growth of fast food chains like McDonald’s around the world. It’s hard for countries to turn down a food company who really does configure their menu to the consumers their serving. I find it interesting that Bolivia found a way to resist this. Its topography is what made the last store close in 2002. McDonald’s couldn’t survive in the mountainous country with the Andes and the Amazon. They were able to resist because the nation always prioritized local control of its food system and eating healthy. Its people value food, food producers, and their ecosystems

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

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E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:20 PM

In this article the resources or lack there of are a huge issue for the children in these schools. It makes me think of our society and the technology and other resources that we have aviable to and dont think twice about compared to this society that has nothing. This also triggered my mind of a prospective teacher as to thinking of the differnces between learning styles in the regions.

Malcolm Haines's curator insight, Today, 12:20 AM

This is an important time in world history for learning how we all learn. Ultimately East vs West on the cultural field will no longer apply.

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Russian Summer

Russian Summer | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
At the dacha, the soul of Russia--and its cultural divide--is on display. In vacation cottages the women are in housedresses. The men, Speedos and rubber boots. They brood, plant, party, and restore their souls.

 

The dacha (a seasonal second home or a vacation spot) is incredibly important in Russia.  It is is estimated that over 50% of city residences in Russia own a dacha as a way to culturally connect with the countryside.  This is a nice glimpse into that life. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article talks about the almost mythical feelings of a Russian summer spent in a dacha.  The brief summer is enjoyed and experienced from a home in the country that is a representation of freedom to the Russian people.  The oppressive Soviet sate was hard to escape but for a few months out of the year, people who owned dachas could get away and enjoy life.  It gave city dwellers a place to garden and to relax from the city.  The dacha is still an integral part of the Russian soul.

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luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 10:16 AM
Excelente compartir la tranquilidad rural y el dinamismo de la urbe.
luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 10:16 AM
Excelente compartir la tranquilidad rural y el dinamismo de la urbe.
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 12:02 PM

This is definitely a part of the country/cultural side of Russia. Bathing with animals and in lakes like this is definitely not a part of urban Russia. Throughout societies, there is always an urge to live a different lifestyle. In this country, the residents are given an option to live both countryside Russian life and urban Russian life.

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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

McDonald’s is a company that is good at adjusting their brand to fit into the markets they are trying to enter.  This shows a positive side to globalization, in my opinion, because it shows that a large company is sensitive to the needs and wants of the place they are going into and is willing to find ways to adapt to the culture they are entering.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 11:21 PM

I believe this is a wise decision by McDonald's to adjust their menu for the people of India who are vegetarian. India's population is over one billion now; many of those people are vegetarian. McDonald's is one of the world's most successful fast food chains and they have a chance to lure millions of new customers into their restaurant. This is a great example of a global company making small changes in order to attract people with specific customs and cultural norms. 

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 24, 12:49 PM

When one thinks about huge brands like McDonalds, very specific food items may come to mind.  These items, like the Big Mac in the United States and other select countries, are very iconic in terms of representation to its consumers and competitors.  However, traveling to a different country would expose one to the fact that the cuisine at a restaurant owned by the same company may be quite different.  McDonalds is a master at globalization because they have created a huge reputation and have a lot of power in the global market.  At the same time, they have tuned in to the local cultures and their values and traditions.  In places like India, this is very neccesary if McDonalds is to maintain a strong market there because a large portion of the population is vegetarian.  Not only would they not enjoy eating a Big Mac, they may be insulted by its presence on the menu and feel generally ignored by the company in terms of their traditions and beliefs.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 6:20 PM

I am impressed that McDonald's knows their clientele so well! This is a company that will last since it is very globally conscious and therefore can open a restaurant in any country.

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article was interesting as it shows that the problems faced in the United States due to immigration are not unique.  The friction between old and new immigration seems to be universal.  How different counties handle and adapt to the changing demographics of their people is challenging and shows the character of the population.  I was unaware of the makeup of Belize’s population or that they were an English speaking country.  This article told me a lot about the people of this country. 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 25, 2013 10:51 PM

As a former British territory English is the main language for now.  Because of the country's success in harsh economic times immigration to this country is increasing, which is chaning the demographics.  Spanish is now growing in importance as immigrants from Gutaemala, Honduras and El Salvador enter Belize. These immigrants are supplying the cheap labor to work in the sugar and banana platations in the outlying areas, while others are working in the oil export industry and the growing tourism industry.  Much like the migrant workers that come to the US to work in agriculture, the immigrants to Belize are taking the low paying, but labor intensive, jobs that some people that do just not want to do.  One thing I found ironic, politicians "buying" votes to the new growing immigrant population...sound familiar??

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 11, 1:24 PM

Belize is surrounded by nations much less well-off than they are themselves, which makes them attractive for migrants.  This is greatly changing the cultural make-up of this resource-rich, coastal country.  Fortunately, the countries inhabitants are welcoming to the newcomers and ethnic differences are not seen negative.  However, the large influx of culturally different people are creating issues that the present working-generation has to deal with, especially land availability and job opportunities in an increasingly Spanish-speaking market.  If Belizeans can maintain their positive views of those different then them, they will hopefully adapt to these changes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 1:48 PM

Accents are a part of life. They can be developed over time for many reasons. Belize is a country full of immigrants and constant migration. Once upon a time, Belize may have spoken Spanish.Languages are developed every day within countries. Belize happens to be an English speaking country with a Spanish accent. No surprise there.

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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video is great it shows how one person can make a difference.  The guy was able to bring skateboarding to Afghanistan and help children have an outlet for recreation that they previously did not have.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:16 PM

While visiting other countries, people get a glimpse of how others live. In Australia, children are allowed to play all sorts of games and sports for recreational fun. In Afghanistan however, this is not the case. What this Australian man is doing is helping out the Afghan youth. They need some inspiration and in order for them to get that they need outside sources (and people) like this man.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:35 AM

This one man is trying to give these children something of their own to hold onto. They don't have the activities and recreational opportunities that children do in Australia.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 12:18 PM

The Skateistan organization has provided Afghan boys and girls with the opportunity for recreation.  Recreation is important for children to make friends, but more importantly in a tense country with many different ethnic backgrounds, it fosters community building and exposure to other people.  This organization has given kids freedom and job opportunities that are actually rewarding.  The blending of cultural interests illustrates how very similar people are; the Afghan kids are just as willing to participate in the unknown sport of skateboarding as any kid would be from a society where it is a popular sport.

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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.

 

Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates.  Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I liked this story because it is about how food changes.  The original Chinese immigrants to America changed their food over time to adapt to American ingredients and tastes, now the owner of this restaurant who was a third generation Chinese-American has brought the cuisine back to China.  Where it is so different, there to the food that they are used to that it is something new.  I liked this article I felt it showed how things can change.

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Jennifer Brown's curator insight, September 10, 3:33 PM

I wonder if this is more for the "selfish" american or if they are trying to fatten up the Chinese population.

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 4:59 PM
This story is awesome! the differences between Chinese and Chinese American food show how globalization and immigration fuses cultures together. The owners of Fortune Cookie are able to share the American Chinese food only because of globalization. If they could not receive American products and brands such as skippy peanut butter and heinz ketchup, the restaurant simply would not function for its purpose.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 10:53 AM

This story is awesome! the differences between Chinese and Chinese American food show how globalization and immigration fuses cultures together. The owners of Fortune Cookie are able to share the American Chinese food only because of globalization. If they could not receive American products and brands such as skippy peanut butter and heinz ketchup, the restaurant simply would not function for its purpose.

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The video showed an interesting report on bootlegging in Pakistan.  The comment at the end was the most interesting to me.  A person interviewed said that the society used to be more open and free but now they are not.  The rich can do as they like but the people cannot.  The dangers of bootlegging is such that if the police catch you then you will be arrested or have to pay a bribe but if the Taliban catch you then you will be killed.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:47 PM

Other than the actual product, there is no difference between these bootleggers and the illegal drug trade in the US. Even when they said that people that drink the alcohol get arrested, there is no difference. In the US we put heroin addicts in jail every day. Also, in the US the illegal drug trade is very lucrative, but also very dangerous.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2:36 PM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This comedian is very funny and he is right middle easterners are not seen t be funny in western media.  It is important to see that everyone like to laugh and that we are all the same.

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Sushma Sharma's comment, June 22, 2013 10:38 PM
Humour makes life worth living with deeper insights
Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:18 AM

This comedian sure does his best job at showing that the Middle East is not the chaotic war zone we see on American television every day, and what a better place to do it in than Qatar, a place where he would have a very diverse audience.  He made light of each race in the audience, drawing laughs instead of slander. He made jokes about Lebanese, Qataris, Saudis, and Iranians, amongst others.  This really broke many of the stereotypes that exist about people of Middle Eastern descent in our society. Instead of seeing them protesting or fighting amongst themselves, we see them enjoying each other’s company just as every race in America does every day.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:20 PM

This is actual comical. Learning can be boring to some people while learning in fun ways can be awesome. He uses funny ways of telling people what to do and not to do and it works for the crowd.

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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:15 PM

This article makes an argument for having a girl rather than a boy in China. With all of the males, brides are in high demand. Their demands for gifts are also high, as they can be picky with so many grooms looking for husbands. Parents of boys must pay for the apartment for the couple as a wedding gift and this puts a heavy financial strain on the family, especially when there are multiple boys.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 11:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The rapid modernization of India along with the rural attitudes and male centric society makes it difficult for women who are raped to get justice.  Mostly because to come forward as a rape victim will take their honor away.  If they have to admit it happened then their lives will be ruined.  Even when their family stands behind them, the women are in fear and one almost killed herself because she felt pressured to testify.  The men who rape these women are from the small villages around the area and feel free to do as they please because they do not fear that their victims will report the abuse.  Things will not change until attitudes towards women and rape change in this area. 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 6, 4:47 PM

It appears the lifestyle of young educated women living in modern cities are quite different than the tradition villagers living in the countryside. As urban expansion is taking place, these two types of people are coming together. Unfortunately, the conservative villagers are raping some of the young modern women. Apparently the villagers typically do not see young women walk freely during the night, and as a result the men are mistreating and raping the women. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:37 PM

This issue is very distrubing. First of all it talks about the poor inocent women and girls who leave their house so they are automatically a victim and should be forwarned that they will be hurt if leaving thie house like as if they should be resticted to their home life and never leave. This would be demonstrated as the old India but they are living or rying to live in the New India where the Women in this soicety should nto be subjected to these kinds of crimes. For example something that really took me was "The accused are almost always young high school dropouts from surrounding villages, where women who work outside the home are often seen as lacking in virtue and therefore deserving of harassment and even rape." And then this quote by one of the accused mothers; "“If these girls roam around openly like this, then the boys will make mistakes,” the mother of two of those accused in the rape said in an interview, refusing to give her name."" Like come on get your stuff together, you should have raised your children better than this.  I have to wonder what this society thinks and whether or not people are questioning what kind of society they are living in and if this society is pressured by the values of the sexes.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:06 PM

Getting away with rape in any country is absolutely disgusting. Especially in India where women have been brutalized with no punishment to the predator, these women have a right to stand up for themselves. Being stalked and raped is something that the police need to get a grip on happening to their citizens.

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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.

 

This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.

 

"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."

 

Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?

 

Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This pod cast shows the dichotomy of old and new.  The villagers earn a living being a living museum of their past culture.  But to do that they need to keep all modern influences away from the tourist village which leads to them living in a separate village nearby. 

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:47 PM

The more authentic village is the one with the folk culture the rural one, because they haven’t lost their traditions and their identity. Culture can be a also a commodity for example you have Papua New Guinea. People are intrigue on their way of living so they will pay to go see them. Places like Papua New Guinea attract a lot of tourist. A country with tourist is a country that is receiving money.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:59 AM

This NPR audio source reveals two totally different lives in Papua New Guinea.  There is one side that caters to tourism by showing the "old" Papua New Guinea.  This village promotes tourism and it has tours that show old, sort of primitive traditions in Papua New Guinea.  It is still important to the natives because it does preserve their past culture.  The villagers feel that the world is becoming so westernized that they cannot go back to the old ways of traditions such as cannibalism, wearing little clothing, etc., but when tourists travel to this village, those are the things they want to see.  The man in the audio source then traveled to another village where he witnessed how people of Papua New Guinea actually live, which is westernized.  I think that both villages are authentic.  One village represents their past culture and traditions and origins which is still important, and the other village represents globalization and the changes that the people of Papua New Guinea adapt to.  Culture can be a commodity because people such as westerners buy into what they think a country's particular culture is, even though that culture existed centuries ago and the culture has drastically changed since.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 2:56 PM

The tourists visiting Papua New Guinea enjoy visiting the villages where people are supposedly living in the past. I am sure some visitors still believe these villagers are still cannibals. People years ago once came here and told the ancient villagers to abandon their culture and leave their religion behind. Today, tourists are visiting and paying to see these villagers living in the past.   

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:01 PM

As morbid as this is, I love learning about the Aztec culture and the fact that they discovered so many bones here makes me infinitely more curious about what is buried under the rest of the city and how well it may be preserved.

Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 11:58 AM

This should remind us all that we're quite literally built on the sacrifices of our ancestors, no pun intended. Many of the ancient cities of the world lay right under the surface of their modern counterparts, and the secrets yet discovered which they contain is enough to spend lifetimes studying!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 4:09 PM

It is not uncommon to find bones underneath rubble and construction sites. To find this amount of ancient bones and bodies underneath that whole place is quite absurd. Now that this has been exposed and people are aware of it, government has cleared the block and revealed the temple.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work

After Alabama Immigration Law, Few Americans Taking Immigrants' Work | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
ONEONTA, Ala. -- Potato farmer Keith Smith saw most of his immigrant workers leave after Alabama's tough immigration law took effect, so he hired Americans.

 

Geography is all about the interconnected of themes and places.  This issue in Alabama is displaying these interconnections quite vividly.  Economics, immigration, culture, politics and agriculture are intensely intertwined in this issue.   


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is another article that highlights the skill deficit in this country.  People seem to be afraid of doing hard work and would rather do nothing then work hard to learn this skill.  If it were a choice between no job and this type of job people would take the jobs but the third choice of unemployment payments makes people who might do these jobs decide not to.  As long as they are paid more to not work then work, they will not do the jobs that need workers.  The farmer made a good point that a skilled picker can make $200-$300 a day but an unskilled worker doing the job makes only $24 a day.  The work ethic of this country needs to be changed, young people today do not want to work hard or put in the effort.  When farmers can no longer get workers how long will it be before there is a food problem as well as a worker problem in this country.  It is possible to make a good living doing these types of jobs but not as long as people feel the work is beneath them or they are unwilling to do the hard manual labor required to do the job well.

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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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NYTimes Video: City of Endangered Languages

New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world.

 

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video available. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article and video were very interesting.  They point out how a city full of immigrants can help preserver a dying language.  The work being done to learn about and preserve these obscure languages is great.  The fact that in New York you will hear language spoken more there than in their home country is astounding to me and very interesting.  This fact is key to preserving these language as they are from areas of the world were the technology level is much lower and less likely to be preserved.  It is also interesting as it shows where people are coming from to live in NY.  The city draws immigrants like a sponge draws in water and this adds to the cultural mosaic that is NY city.

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