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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I find it interesting to see where certain languages become dominant for business use.  This infographic is very interesting and useful in determining different trends in both the spread of language and the historical factors that spread these languages in this region.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:54 AM

Looks like English colonist did a better job. Is weird to see Spanish placed in that location, when "spain" is very close to the northwest dominated by Arabic.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:53 PM

This map shows the different languages that are used for business dealings in Africa. It is interesting to see that Africa itself has many languages, but not one of them is predominantly used. The two languages that are mainly used in Africa are English and French, with  Arabic, Portuguese, Spanish and a combination of Arabic and French used in Mauritania, while English and French is used in Madagascar.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:38 AM

The continued influence of colonization can be seen when this map is compared with maps of colonial Africa. The dominant business language match up almost exactly with the country that used to dominate the area. The fact that these languages are used for business shows how the deep impacts the European settlers had across the continent. Even the northern portion of the continent shows the strong influence and ties the region has with the Arabic world. 

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This infographic was very interesting.  By using color coding it highlights the areas of influence the colonel powers still maintain over their old possessions.  This map is helpful in understanding how this affects the politics of theses regions today.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 12:59 PM

Colonial ties are still very prevalent due to Europe's dependence upon the resources of Africa. European countries like England and France invest billions in Africa, not to help those African nations, but to build infrastructure for resource extraction or to keep governments stable. Though the true exploitation of Africa has ended, the current situation certainly has the ring of exploitation as the people of Europe enjoy the diamonds and chocolate harvested by the multitudes of impoverished people of Africa.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

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Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country

Belize: A Spanish Accent in an English-Speaking Country | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"BELIZE has long been a country of immigrants. British timber-cutters imported African slaves in the 18th century, and in the 1840s Mexican Mayans fled a civil war."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article was interesting as it shows that the problems faced in the United States due to immigration are not unique.  The friction between old and new immigration seems to be universal.  How different counties handle and adapt to the changing demographics of their people is challenging and shows the character of the population.  I was unaware of the makeup of Belize’s population or that they were an English speaking country.  This article told me a lot about the people of this country. 

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 25, 2014 10:12 AM

(Central America topic 1)

I see many similarities between the experiences of Belize and the United States recently. First, there is the struggle for some to adapt to the growing use of the Spanish language. The article states that it is becoming harder and harder for monologists to find jobs, and from what I have seen and experienced the same can be said here. Also, both countries have used immigrants as 'political tools', such as Belize's supposed rapid acceptance of around 1,000 just before an election. This relates locally, at least in my opinion, to the supporters and opposition to Rhode Island's voter ID law, among other examples.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 28, 2014 6:23 PM

The migration to Belize and the restoration of the  Spanish language can be seen as a good thing for the identity of the country.  As a nation of migrants they are veering away from the British connotation of British Honduras

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 29, 2014 12:24 PM

Belize is in the midst of some important changes. Historically, Belize was settled by the British who imported slaves from Africa, thus providing Belize with a strong English speaking background. With more and more Salvadorians and Guatemalans seeking out Belize for work, the influx of Spanish speakers may impact the necessity to speak Spanish. While there is little hostility between ethnic groups, those native to Belize are finding it harder and harder to come by work, and many are getting pushed out of jobs because they are not fluent in Spanish.  

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150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing

150 Years Ago, Sochi Was the Site of a Horrific Ethnic Cleansing | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Czar Alexander II may have freed the serfs, but his war against the stateless people of the Caucasus cannot be ignored

 

The czar’s approval of this rapid expulsion of hundreds of thousands of Circassians to the Ottoman Empire resulted in an ethnic cleansing through disease and drowning as overcrowded ferries crossed the Black Sea. The Ottomans were unprepared for the influx of refugees, and the absence of adequate shelter caused even more deaths from exposure. Those Circassians who attempted to remain in the Russian Empire and fight for their land were massacred. Sochi’s “Red Hill,” where the skiing and snowboarding events will take place during these Olympic Games, was the site of the Circassian last stand, where the Imperial Russian armies celebrated their “victory” over the local defenders.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

It is interesting to learn the history of a place that most American’s didn’t know existed until the Olympics.  It is always helpful to have things placed in a historic perspective.  The historic background makes understanding modern day events easier

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Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 2014 12:22 PM

For every genocide I have heard of, there are usually two more which I haven't, this being one of them. Usually behind every leader who sounds too good to be true, there is something horrible blighting their reign. The Muslim Circassians didn't bow to Alexander's Christian Orthodox authority, and the rest is history.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:56 PM

Czar Alexander II was a horrific leader who " ethnicially cleansed" the people of Sochi and cleansed them through disease and drowning as over populated ferries crossed the Black Sea. This act of innaliation of the war against the stateless people is just outrageous and unforgiving. In Sochi the "red hill" where the skiiers and snowboarders are set to take off is the site at which one of the massacres happened, it makes you wonder if the rest of the world knows this or are they ignorant to the fact that the Olympics at Sochi is glorified as having the two veritile terrains in which you can swim and ski in the a couple miles form eachother. I wonder what people who thnk if they knew the truth about Sochi.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:33 PM

This is basically like a mini Holocaust. When do people think its okay to do something like this? It boggles my mind how things like this can actually go on in the world still with todays technologies and armed forces. 

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Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 16, 2014 6:20 PM

Of course archaeological finds like this are always interesting for understanding the past but this story has two angles. First and probably the most obvious is the wealth of anthropological and history information that can be gathered. This could potentially lead to an advancement in the understanding of Aztec society. But on another angle it is an interesting article because it illustrates how so often the new is built right on top of the old. Where was the old capital of the Aztec Empire? Right under the new capital of Mexico. While by doing so one definitely keeps the same advantages that lead to choosing that land in the first place but it also destroys history and origins of a peoples history.  

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:50 PM

Wow! What an amazing archaeological discovery. Seeing the image of the Aztec temple superimposed to Mexico city really shows the immense size of this structural relic.It is interesting to know that the Spaniards had also built their religious temple on this location. This is a tremendous find not only structurally but also in human biology. Many bodies were exhumed during this discovery. The bodies can not only tell us scientifically what has happened ,we can also learn from them what type of funerary processes were used during this time.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:00 PM

While the Aztec' civilization has been gone for a very long time, there are still traces of it resurfacing today. With the uncovering of the bones, it shows that the Aztec temple was very much in the heart of Mexico City has still has more secrets to uncover