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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 6, 2013 8:30 AM

This video and article briefly show the reasons behind the current tension between Spain, NATO allies and fellow EU members.  The deeper, underlying issues though are all fundamentally rooted in the complex local political geography.  As an exclave of the UK on a peninsula connected to the Spanish mainland that controls access to the Mediterranean Sea, there is naturally going to be friction over this unusual political configuration. Spain, in what the chief Minister of Gibraltar calls "sabre-rattling," is flexing its muscles and considering using their border and airspace as a political leverage.  Spain is upset that Gibraltar has created an artificial reef in waters that their fishermen use.  Spanish fisherman have recently condemned the escalating political rhetoic.


Questions to Ponder: Why are both parties politically and culturally invested in this piece of territory?  What challenges are there for a small exclave when neighbors aren't friendly?  How does Spanish and British suprantional connections impact this issue?


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, Spain, Europe, autonomy.

karenpinney's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:13 AM

Relationships between Britain and Spain.

megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

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The Golan Heights

The Golan Heights | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

In early November 2012, three Syrian tanks entered the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of the Golan Heights. The move by Syria is the first violation of the zone in 40 years and concerns countries of the region. Since then some of the Syrian rebels have also been reported operating in Golan Heights.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article stresses the importance of geography when discussing political situation with neighboring countries.  The fact that the heights are such a strategic advantage to whoever owns them explains why they are so contested.  As long as these two countries are not friendly nations this disagreement over the strategic point will continue.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, April 3, 2013 9:10 AM

This map can be used to illustrate not only the political and cultural significance of the Golan Heights, but also its environmental significance as a source of water for the Jordan-Yarmuk River Valley

Louis Culotta's curator insight, April 4, 2013 6:35 PM

Heres some info on how poeple have been living in regards to a troubled area of the world.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 2014 5:13 PM

To say the area of the Golan Heights is futile would be a drastic understatement. This area of land bordering Syria and northern Israel is of great importance to both of these sets of people. Over 40 years ago Israel claimed this land for their citizens because of it's high elevation and prime access to water supplies.Now in modern times Syria is making drastic moves to claim the land ,which they believe belongs to it's citizens. It is in the persistence of both of these sets of people that turmoil is being created. This is an important ares to both of these groups of people.If Syria is persistent in their attempts to claim this region it is fearful that Israel may need to fight back at some point. With these two countries at odds with each other it is possible more countries may also get involved.

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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This video was entertaining and informative.  I was aware of some of the information he related but was unaware of the “no touching” zone and I found it amusing.  The saying that good fences make good neighbors is taken to an extreme here.  The odd shape of boarders has always been interesting to me.  Reasons why a boarder has a shape are always interesting and sometimes amusing.

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 5, 2014 8:45 PM

This video shows how political geography does not always match up perfectly with physical geography, showing how the "no-touching zone" between the US and Canada has led to several border irregularities. It's very interesting to see how a seemingly straight border on a map is actually an odd and irregular jagged line that defines the political boundary. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

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Uruguay’s government, new pot dealer on the block

Uruguay’s government, new pot dealer on the block | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Amsterdam, eat your heart out. This South American country has big plans for marijuana fans.

 

The distribution of narcotics impacts virtually every country in the world; there are incredibly divergent strategies on how to mitigate these problems that are a result of sophisticated distribution networks.  What is the best way to stop the flow of dangerous drugs and the illegal activities that accompany the drug trade?  If you were in charge, what strategies would you recommend? 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article is interesting in it is a different view of how a government should combat drug related violence.  The idea that to legalize lesser drugs will bring down the demand for harder illegal drugs is an interesting stance.  The hope is this will cut the feet out from under the dangerous and violent drug cartels and bring down the crime rate in Uruguay.  It will be interesting to see what comes of this move.

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Kendra King's curator insight, February 8, 4:37 PM

The brilliance of this plan is in the taxes. I am not sure allowing people to smoke marijuana will get them to stop doing cocaine. Especially since, the article mentioned citizens are already allowed to legally use marijuana if they wish. If this was the countries only argument in favor of the legislation, I would be against it as there is no evidence to support the idea of replacing one for the other. However, the money garnered from the State being the sole supplier would then go to treating drug addicts. So unlike our drug war, this country logically went after a part of what is causing the problem in the first place. Such an idea has a great deal of potential for stopping repeat users. Eventually though, the money raised from these taxes might also need to go towards prevention education as well.  

 

Drug war aside, I think regulating marijuana is a good idea anyways. As long as people are going to do it, you might as well control it. Not only does the country profit from the taxes, but the citizens are safer. As it stands right now, people are getting the product from the black market and there is no proper product standard on that market.   Under the State people would actually getting a type of weed that wouldn’t be tainted or has an overly potent does to THC. Honestly, that reason alone would sell me. However, with violence in an area that is “traditionally the safest,” the benefits of regulation probably aren’t too high on the list of political motivation.  

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 9, 4:48 PM

This was an interesting article, a bit outdated, yet still informative. I personally know nothing about the legalization of drugs, specifically Marijuana, in any foreign country.

It certainly comes off as is the Uruguayan government is trying to monopolize the growing and sale of Marijuana. From a government perspective they would be able to handle the sales of pot and use the profit for state needs... I am assuming state needs. The article stated the revenue would be roughly $75 million, thats a good amount of money to throw around in regards to infrastructure and other further investments. In time the government would allow for private organizations to grow Cannabis but would have to sell it over to the government to be legally distributed. Not only would the government be setting the price for the buying of bulk from the producers but they would also be reaping all the benefits from sales. Also, the growers of Marijuana would be taxed... The government is winning either way. 

An issue with this plan is the fact that the government is a direct beneficiary of the profits obtained from the drug. It is clear that the government wins. Who else wins? Stoners? I suppose it is good that they wont be busted for smoking anymore... I hope there is a good amount of money from this revenue going back into the state. I'm sure jobs will be created to keep up with the Marijuana sales. What will happen to the people already selling Marijuana? They can't sell it anymore if the government is only allowed to. Perhaps this could create an issue? 

I understand the purpose of this project/plan. I believe it needs more structure and perhaps a more descriptive outcome, not just the government reaping the profits and not saying where they will spend the money. 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 7:15 PM

Uruguay was one of the safest nations in the Latin America until an outbreak of hard drugs, with violence following it. in order to combat this outbreak Uruguay wants to legalize the "soft core" drug of marijuana. the government thinks this should reduce the consumption of Crak-cocaine and other forms of the coco leaf. this is following he current trend in the America's. this would not legalize the growing or selling of marijuana, it would make it state mandated and taxed while the possession of small amounts is legal.

i think that this will be great, with easy access to the drug it will take the exhilaration out of doing drugs. i do think this will ease people off of harder drugs to the accessible drug of marijuana. although people who use crak will not be changed immediately and satisfied with pot, it will help the whole economy from trying crak- cocaine.