Geography 200
Follow
Find tag "NationalGeographic"
94 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Russian Summer

Russian Summer | Geography 200 | Scoop.it
At the dacha, the soul of Russia--and its cultural divide--is on display. In vacation cottages the women are in housedresses. The men, Speedos and rubber boots. They brood, plant, party, and restore their souls.

 

The dacha (a seasonal second home or a vacation spot) is incredibly important in Russia.  It is is estimated that over 50% of city residences in Russia own a dacha as a way to culturally connect with the countryside.  This is a nice glimpse into that life. 


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article talks about the almost mythical feelings of a Russian summer spent in a dacha.  The brief summer is enjoyed and experienced from a home in the country that is a representation of freedom to the Russian people.  The oppressive Soviet sate was hard to escape but for a few months out of the year, people who owned dachas could get away and enjoy life.  It gave city dwellers a place to garden and to relax from the city.  The dacha is still an integral part of the Russian soul.

more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:02 PM

This is definitely a part of the country/cultural side of Russia. Bathing with animals and in lakes like this is definitely not a part of urban Russia. Throughout societies, there is always an urge to live a different lifestyle. In this country, the residents are given an option to live both countryside Russian life and urban Russian life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:07 AM

“Everyone in Russia has a dacha story”. Dachas are small, summer cottages and cabins that over half of Russia’s population owns. While many people in the United States have this mental image of Russians as drunk, stern, communists, the dacha shows insight to a life much more similar to ours than many people would probably imagine. Russians use dachas as a form of escape, in the same way that many Americans visit a beach house or a mountain cabin in the summer. The need to escape and break through the rut of the daily grind is something that transcends ethnicity or nationality. The need to leave our concrete jungles for the simplicities and feeling of completeness offered by the natural environment is something much more  primordial.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:12 PM

Everyone in Russia has a dacha story. It may be a trace of childhood memory like playing ball late into evening by a sun that won’t set, gathering pinecones to perfume the fire, or swimming in an icy pond. It may be quietly romantic, a first love that fades with the season or blossoms into marriage. An older woman tells of coming home from work to find her husband in bed with her best friend. She kicked him out and, with retirement looming and no husband, wondered, What will I do now? The answer was the dacha she bought for 500 rubles, with a forest nearby for mushroom hunting, a lake, and a garden. “The dacha saved my life,” she says. Sweet or bitter, lighthearted or dark, the story always takes place in summer. A dacha, after all, is a summer cottage.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This article talks about not only the recent archeological find but the relevance of it.  Also included in this article are links to other relevant articles and a cool picture of the past superimposed over the modern day site.

more...
Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:00 PM

While the Aztec' civilization has been gone for a very long time, there are still traces of it resurfacing today. With the uncovering of the bones, it shows that the Aztec temple was very much in the heart of Mexico City has still has more secrets to uncover

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:39 PM

This article shows just how varied the cultural landscape of Mexico is.  Unlike the Native populations in the US, the Aztecs had a large, flourishing civilization that was described by the first conquistadors "to match the glory of any major city in Europe."  When the Spanish eventually conquered the Aztec Civilization, they built right on top of the ruins of the old Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan.  The way that Mexico City is layered right on top of the old Aztec city, means that many human remains and ancient buildings are buried right below the modern city.  This is what makes Mexico City different than any city in the United States or Canada, the cities in these two countries were not built over massive cities that pre-dated them.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 10:07 PM

This seems to be quite a large sacrifice that was discovered. And while it may be just that, it seems more like a mass execution, possibly performed by the Spanish when they battled with the Aztecs and put at the foot near the Aztec temple to send a message that their God could not save them.  If it is a sacrifice, its a pretty large one.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Making National Geographic Maps

Making National Geographic Maps | Geography 200 | Scoop.it

This map of Cuba, National Geographic's first map of Cuba in over 100 years, has an incredible backstory. 

 

While touring the National Geographic headquarters, the cartographer Juan Valdés (pictured here with me) told me the story of his early days living in Cuba before Castro,  Pictured is one of his 36 meticulous drafts produced to create this cartographic masterpiece of his home country.  To hear it in his own words, embedded in this link is a 18 minute video of his talk at National Geographic on Cuba and the production of the map.  The last 7 minutes are especially helpful for mapping students to see all the decisions and stages involved in creating a professional reference map.

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, National Geographic, Latin America, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The background story of the cartographer along with the explanation of how the map was made was very interesting.  The different steps involved in making a map were interesting and insightful.

more...
Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:54 PM

For starters, these pictures were fascinating to look at. It was amazing to see how much time and effort goes in making just one map. The video was informative and really gives you an idea of the unique process that is being done. The pictures fascinated me the most though. You could just tell just by looking at the pictures that they take what they do seriously. Also, you can tell that they are passionate about what they do. You can especially tell that you yourself had a great time and that you were really interested in what was going on. It is really awesome that National Geographic interviewed you about your visit. In the video, it was nice that he started off with some background information about Cuba and the special times that he shared with his father that made him go into cartography. Overall, the pictures and the video were really a sight to see.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 10:11 PM

This was a great presentation. I cant imagine how long it must take to make an accurate map, especially when these cartographers are so passionate about their work and their craft.  You can tell that to be a cartographer, you must be extremely passionate and dedicated to your craft.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, April 16, 4:58 PM

It's absolutely crazy to be that Juan Valdes had up to thirty-six different drafts of the map of Cuba, just to come up with the one, most accurate map of the country. When I see maps, I never think of how long it must have taken to get it exactly the way it is to be the most accurate map possible.  It also makes me wonder how completely accurate our maps are, because when comparing multiple, you can see slight differences.