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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The video showed an interesting report on bootlegging in Pakistan.  The comment at the end was the most interesting to me.  A person interviewed said that the society used to be more open and free but now they are not.  The rich can do as they like but the people cannot.  The dangers of bootlegging is such that if the police catch you then you will be arrested or have to pay a bribe but if the Taliban catch you then you will be killed.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:47 PM

Other than the actual product, there is no difference between these bootleggers and the illegal drug trade in the US. Even when they said that people that drink the alcohol get arrested, there is no difference. In the US we put heroin addicts in jail every day. Also, in the US the illegal drug trade is very lucrative, but also very dangerous.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2:36 PM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This comedian is very funny and he is right middle easterners are not seen t be funny in western media.  It is important to see that everyone like to laugh and that we are all the same.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 10:25 PM

This man is brilliant in getting some pretty serious points across.  Talking about a very serious issue with people can be really difficult to do, but Jobrani uses humor to get his point across.  He talks about the differences in greeting people in countries, and about how even in Qatar he couldn't find any Qataris that worked there.  Everyone seemed to be from another country that he encountered.  He also discussed the fear that Americans had for 'brown' people, not just Muslim's but just people who may appear to maybe look like a Muslim.  That's hard to hear, for anybody but with the use of his humor and talking about how you should throw random fun English words into your Arabic conversations and you'll be all set, it makes the whole situation a little bit easier to handle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 1:45 PM

Maz Jobrani uses population geography, political geography and cultural geography in his comedy. In Doha, Qatar there are massive influxes of workers leads to many of the workers in Qatar not being Qatari, he jokes about many different ethnicities greeting him when he got into Doha all of which are not Doha. This reflects real population geography changes taking place in Doha, because of its growing economy more people are going to Doha to work. He touches upon cultural differences in regards to the number of kisses each country in the Middle East is customary. As Westerners we tend to generalize the Middle East, Maz Jobrani challenges those stereotypes in his stand up and shed light on the predujices that Americans have with regards to people from the Middle East. His Hi-jack joke highlights just that.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 9, 9:27 PM

This video is interesting, in that, this comedian is tackling the subject of multiple cultures in the Middle East. Maz Jobrani illustrates the cultural differences between countries and how the Middle East is portrayed in the Western media, as a very serious society who never has any fun, but it shows the entire crowd (which was diverse) laughing and not fitting into that media stereotype.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:20 PM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:25 PM

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.