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Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

The video showed an interesting report on bootlegging in Pakistan.  The comment at the end was the most interesting to me.  A person interviewed said that the society used to be more open and free but now they are not.  The rich can do as they like but the people cannot.  The dangers of bootlegging is such that if the police catch you then you will be arrested or have to pay a bribe but if the Taliban catch you then you will be killed.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:36 PM

Interesting to see this happening in other areas of the world besides the United States during the times of prohibition.  If there is a will there is a way.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:57 AM

this makes sense. even in regions controlled by Muslim extremest people are people and they want their booze. this is a perfect example of the reason why you cannot punish all people of a certain group for the actions of a few.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.

Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This comedian is very funny and he is right middle easterners are not seen t be funny in western media.  It is important to see that everyone like to laugh and that we are all the same.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:56 PM

This video was great to watch. I watched this in class and had to write about it. Humor is a great way to shed light on certain topics that can be really heavy. This comedian is middle eastern himself which makes it better for him to talk about these topics. Many individuals don't know the lighter side to middle eastern people just because all they see is negative aspects of the culture. I enjoyed that he could talk about serious topics and have a room full of people not only laughing at it but being educated at the same time. People don't feel like they're being strictly taught because they're watching a comedian give a show. Being middle eastern myself, i found this video great because raising awareness and allowing more insight about the middle east is a powerful thing when it has always has a negative context. 

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:42 PM

"I never knew these people laughed." This is perhaps one of the most sad things that could be said. It dehumanizes the middle east in a very cruel way. It implies that people in the middle east do not have any sense of humor and are always serious about everything. Like the United States, there are times to be serious, but there are also times to laugh. The media and even the film industry in the US portrays the middle east as Sodom and Gomorra and the people from the area as misogynistic religious fanatics. It is truly sad that we live in a world where prejudices trump openness and acceptance.      

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:17 PM

its interesting because this video make the middle east seem more european with the differences in culture. people tend to clump these countries together but they are very different and should be seen that way

Rescooped by Elizabeth Bitgood from Geography Education
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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


Via Seth Dixon
Elizabeth Bitgood's insight:

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 2015 4:25 PM

A modern day Batman/Superman, Burka Avenger, with great graphics and an in-depth plot. The television shows the Pakistanis children watch are the same type of shows that I watched growing up, and the shows that the modern day children of today’s youth are watching. The cross-cultural relationship seems so different, but at the roots it is the same. The kids in this show have friends, pets, enemies, a hero, a conflict; everything that an American television show would feature.  Whether the kids are facing a bully, a school closure from a villain, or a life peril from another villain, there undercover school teacher is there ready and willing to save the day. Everybody needs a hero to look up to, so this show is great for the Pakistani youth. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:06 AM

I think this is wonderful.  It also reemphasizes the reality that all children are born without preconceived notions of what is right, what is wrong, what is good, or what is evil.  An American child might look at this and automatically think that the lady in the Burka is a "villain", due to American media and propaganda.  I can't help but think of the backlash that would surround this cartoon if they ever tried to put it on American airwaves.