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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | geography 101 | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
shawn Giblin's insight:

very interesting to think that Turkey is a transcontinental country, as well to find out that asia and europe are actually connected.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 1:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 

 

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Detroit renews urban policy debate

Detroit renews urban policy debate | geography 101 | Scoop.it
A national urban policy would not have saved Detroit, but the city's bankruptcy filing Thursday was a vivid reminder of how the problems of America's cities have long ceased to ...
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shawn Giblin's comment, July 30, 2013 12:35 PM
this relates to our class because it talks about the struggles of urban problems. and i solution to this problem could be developing in more advance technology and new energy sources.
shawn Giblin's comment, July 30, 2013 12:35 PM
to help boost their economy
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Demographic research released today shows decline in Alabama's youth population in 58 counties

Demographic research released today shows decline in Alabama's youth population in 58 counties | geography 101 | Scoop.it
Researchers believe the decrease in youth population is mostly the result of low fertility. Today, the total fertility rate – which measures the average number of children per woman – is down to 1.8.
shawn Giblin's insight:

demographic research has provided results that there has been a decrease in the teens population around the world. Mainly becuae the fertility rates are low. but From my understanding the underlining factore is how the world ecnonomy is doing and it seem that the power countires are stuggling..

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How 100 Degrees Does a Number on You

How 100 Degrees Does a Number on You | geography 101 | Scoop.it
Extreme heat, like we're seeing this summer, is bad news for the human body. Here's why we suffer--and what we can do to avoid dehydration and worse.
shawn Giblin's insight:

with this scoring heat streak, which i did not have a clue about.. so they gave us some tricks how to handle to hot and humdity heat. 

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | geography 101 | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
shawn Giblin's insight:

very interesting to think that Turkey is a transcontinental country, as well to find out that asia and europe are actually connected.

more...
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:26 PM

If Europe and Asia are not different continents based on the tectonic plates that they both share, would that mean that Russia is in a fact a part of Europe. Wouldn't its ties be closely link to that of Asia, because growing up in school, I was taught that Russia was closely related to the Asian continent than it was to Europe. Though Russia is sometimes perceived as being its own continent, I wonder what this discovery will mean for them long term.

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 20, 1:32 PM

The article states that the idea of separate continents comes from European scholars whom wanted to give more definition to there culture and area of the world, essentially there region. I wonder if this could be said in regards to the inhabitant East of the Ural Mountains. Did they want a form of boundary to represent and distinguish there region? None the less, we live in the west so the western perspective is what guides us. 

Even if there never was a Europe and an Asia, there would still be land disputes as to whom has claim to which region/area of land. On a global perspective its viewed as Europe and Asia but when one takes a closer look its simply country and country... not continent and continent. This article is revealing the importance of Eurasia, how it truly does exist. A quasi boundary is not going to separate the once "two continents" rather nothing separates the continents, its all part of Eurasia. 

A neat part of the article is how the writer states recognizing the land mass as two continents is old and out of date. Its basically wrong and non-intelligent. I believe this is important and is something that needs to be recognized on a national scale (here in the United States). Personally I've always recognized the realm as "Eurasia." I now feel more intelligent for doing so! How do people in Europe and with this being said Asia, feel about this more reformed definition of the supercontinent? Do they even recognize it as true? Perhaps they realize there are more important issues at hand like current  countries  disputed and invaded borders.

None the less there is disputed boundaries on a more micro level, when compared to the continent versus continent scheme. For example Russian backed separatists have claimed a portion of Eastern Ukraine. Do people actually see this as Asians expanding into Europe or rather a transcontinental country (Russia) expanding itself more westward. The importance here lies in the disputed country boundaries, not continental boundaries, yet one cannot not deny the significance of the  "continental boundary" which some people do believe in. But the core of the matter is the country to country ratio. 

 

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Large dead zone forming in the Gulf

Large dead zone forming in the Gulf | geography 101 | Scoop.it
Ocean experts had predicted a large “dead zone” area in the Gulf of Mexico this year, and according to the results from a researcher just back from studying the region, those predictions appear to be right on target.
shawn Giblin's insight:

This article talks about how the ocean water has been changing and forming  a new dead zone which means that the oxygen level in the salt water has decrease to dangerously low levels. Which results in fish being killed and harming marine life.

 

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Rising Anti-Immigration Sentiment in the EU

Stratfor Europe Analyst Adriano Bosoni discusses the political implications of the increasing number of migrants from the European Union's periphery to its c...

Via Seth Dixon
shawn Giblin's insight:

Its funny to see that anti-immigration is starting to be a trend around the world first the united states and now europe.I dont agree with illegal immigration but legal mirgartion should  not be a problem.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:12 AM

This video describes the increase in immigration into EU countries from other EU countries.  The EU agreements on free movement are being challenged in countries that feel rightly or wrongly that the immigrants coming in are a drain on their economies during this difficult economic time.  It is interesting to see how Europe deals with this immigration issue compared to how America deals with its immigration issues.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 10, 2014 4:47 PM
(Europe post 8) Europe's immigration 'crisis' seems to echo many of the causes and effects currently being felt in the U.S.'s own situation. As jobs become scarcer, anti-immigrant sentiments start to gain ground. The introduction of new cultures can create a sense of cultural insecurity. Controversial laws are put into effect to try to gain some control on the situation. Though it does seem like an invasion to those already living there, keep in mind that the immigrants aren't trying to cause such things; rather, they are looking to regain lost ground for themselves. I know there is a wide divide on political views, but in the very least individuals and governments alike should keep an open mind (even if not an open door) to what outsiders are experiencing / what their driving force is.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:54 PM

While many talk about tensions regarding immigration they think of the American public's take an immigration while in actuality Europe is having the same problems and if anything tensions are higher than in the States. In Europe the Influx of immigrants primarily from Turkey and the Middle East have brought about a rise in both racial and religious tensions. In America we're somewhat used to cultural melding while in Europe many are used to cultural homogeneity and these foreigners are bringing with them the fear of cultural dilution and the loss of jobs.  

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Political geography News - United Nations, Pemex, Athens Central Vegetable Market Association, Franc

North Korea nuclear test would face "firm" U.N. action: South Korea UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council is united on North Korea's nuclear a...
shawn Giblin's insight:

I know its old issues but these issues still havent  went away 

 

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The Earth as an Island

The Earth as an Island | geography 101 | Scoop.it
An overview of the situation of human life on planet earth and the challenges that might make the earth an inhospitable place for human life, from the About.com Geography GuideSite.
shawn Giblin's insight:

this speaks about the struggles that every living speicies is faced with the current world. Due to overpopulation and gobal warming these speices are left with 3 chioces move, adapt, or die. its not right since humans are the higher power and should know and realize that what we are doing has positve side and a negatives side but the postive side only benifits us. Its time to think of other instead of oursleves becuase they are just as important has our lives. 

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Hong Kong Energy Issues - Geography

A brief introduction to the energy issues in HK and some solutions to solve them.
shawn Giblin's insight:

I believe its time that Hong kong joins the band wagon and  get more advance with their energy sources.,,,

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Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya

Why these Somali refugees do not want to leave Kenya | geography 101 | Scoop.it

"For millions of refugees across Africa life is a daily struggle.  Many dream of one day returning to their homeland while others have spent decades building a new life.  On World Refugee Day, BBC Focus on Africa's Anne Soy visits a Somali family in Nairobi, Kenya, who cannot imagine returning to their roots."


Via Seth Dixon
shawn Giblin's insight:

very moving 

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:44 PM

I don't believe its a refugee's duty to return to their country. I think after some time people start their lives over, for a reason. Most refugees leave their country because it is so bad. This family in the video went to another country and he was there for almost twenty years, that is a long time.  when your in a place for that long going back would mean starting over again. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:04 PM

No matter where you grow up, you form roots to your native land. Times are tough across the globe, especially for those living in Africa. While families plant their roots and look for ways to make things better, sometimes the best way is to leave. What makes people stay when their hometown roots are at rock bottom?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:59 PM

Some people want to stay close to their heritage and native land. Others have no interest in their homelands and want to get away fast. This family doesn't know anything besides being refugees and they want to stay and build their lives there.