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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Joe Andrade's insight:

These photos offer a glimpse of our growing global population. Its quite intersting to see just how densley populated our planet can be in some places.

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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:36 AM

This should definitely be a major concern for the human planet becasue if people are multiplying that quickly and staying alive longer than the futre could be facing some serious problems. For example; the food supply could run low, shelter could definitely become scarce, diease could become a high risk becuase there are so many people that are close which means they could be sharing a number of things. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:58 PM

This is just a clarification that the world population will continue to grow bigger and bigger, and along with that UN projects will increase. 

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, August 27, 10:03 AM

I did not have time to read all of it, but what I did read astounded me. I had mo clue that  some of these countries suffered from overpopulation so badly. And in other countries, like Greece, their population has dropped by what seems like a small amount, but is actually a lot if you think about it. AW :)

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How should the US deliver food aid?

How should the US deliver food aid? | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Radical proposals by President Barack Obama to change the way the US delivers food aid are facing strong opposition in Congress. (Food aid curse or cure?
BBC News - How should the US deliver food aid?
Joe Andrade's insight:

This article demonstrates some ways in which global politics can often become a complicated and touchy subject, even when the goal is just to give aid to those who need it. 

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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


Via Seth Dixon
Joe Andrade's insight:

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

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Gentrification in overdrive on DC’s 14th Street

Gentrification in overdrive on DC’s 14th Street | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Great Recession and its messy aftermath will go into the record books for many things: jobs lost, household wealth destroyed, foreclosure auctions held.
Joe Andrade's insight:

Just another exaple of gentrification going on in the country.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 31, 2013 2:02 PM

Amazing read, especially at the end of the article, when he stated that complaints about parking is a good sign.  I bet it was not a good sign to the people that used to be there that no longer had an affordable place to live.  I understand the need to improve areas, but there has to be some thought, some, about the people that have to leave the area.

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future

Via Seth Dixon
Joe Andrade's insight:

It is interesting to see how over time and depending on geographic location the housing patterns change so drastically. Its fascinating to see how each community uses its land to cater to the needs of its occupants.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed

38 Maps You Never Knew You Needed | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

Some prime examples of map awesomeness for all fellow amateur cartographers to get lost in. Get it?


Via Sabrina Conroy
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Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 1:58 PM

Map 20: Rhode Island = Hilarious

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 30, 2013 11:39 AM

Awesome to see how maps can be used in different ways to convey a meaning. My favorite map is definitely the map of the world portrayed using Super Mario features!

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

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Wine in Sussex, olives in Devon, oranges in Hampshire? How Britain might resemble Madeira by 2060

Wine in Sussex, olives in Devon, oranges in Hampshire? How Britain might resemble Madeira by 2060 | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

According to the latest predictions on global warming Britain from the 2060s could begin to look rather like Madeira. In the first of a two-part investigation into the impact of climate change Tom Heap visits the island 350 miles from the coast of Morocco to find out how we might be living in the second half of the 21st century.

With a climate dominated by the Atlantic, a wet, mountainous north and a warm, dry, over-populated south Madeira already resembles Britain in miniature. The settlers who arrived from Portugal in the 15th century developed a complex farming system that found a niche for dozens of crops, from olives and oranges to wheat and sweet potatoes. Could British farmers prepare for a less predictable climate by studying the delicate agricultural arts of the Madeirans?

 

 


Via SustainOurEarth
Joe Andrade's insight:

Global warming, if it continues as it is currently projected may be changing geography much sooner than some think. According to this report some experts believe that by 2060 England may resemble the Island of Madeira. Having been to this Island i know first hand the drastic change that entails. Some food for thought pertaining to sustaining our enviornment.

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Inside WWII: Interactive Maps

Inside WWII: Interactive Maps | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Go inside World War II and get new insight into the people, battles and events you thought you knew.
Joe Andrade's insight:

These interactive maps show the events of the second world war in a new and interesting way. It allows users to see some of the geographic motives for the war, such as Germanys quest for "Lebensraum" or living space and  Japans expansion into neighboring countries for materials such as oil. It demonstrates how studying geography and history go hand in hand, it is important to understand geographic principals to understand why history plays out the way it did. 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 23, 2013 1:25 PM

Nice quick way to get the user to see some of the key aspects of the War.  Showing the pan-germanism that Hitler esposed when taking the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia to showing the suffering the civilian population of Leningrad.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:53 PM

World War II had a profound impact on so many places; the issues that contributed to these events and complex and inter-related.  This interactive with videos, pictures and commentary is a veritable treasure trove of resources for teachers and students alike.  

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 2:20 AM

This is an interactive map of the world, which depicts the events and facts of the Second World War. Showing the impact felt all across the world and full of historical facts and information. It goes into detail about the motivations behind life changing decisions made and then the impact of them. Full of images, animations and videos, this website is sure to engage and entertain students. This map works geography into the history curriculum, and demonstrates the geographical impact on decision making in the war. It discusses the profound impact felt world wide from WWII and visually demonstrates it, which is great for visual learners. It is full of information for teachers and students. This interactive map is a wonderful resource for any history teacher or history student. 

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Stunning map charts every river in U.S.

Stunning map charts every river in U.S. | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
The U.S. is often thought of as a nation connected by roads—since the 1960s the Interstate Highway has defined American culture and led to untold economic prosperity. But a new map of the nation’s rivers tells a very different story.

Via Seth Dixon
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:21 AM

Seriously, I could stare at this map all day.  It is REALLY cool.  I'm thinking of all kinds of discussion it could bring to the classroom!

John Blunnie's curator insight, July 12, 2013 11:11 AM

Seeing this map really shows why almost all places in the U.S. have been inhabited before the industrial era.

Louis Culotta's comment, July 15, 2013 9:52 AM
this is a very cool way to get a good look at our nations river systems and how to best use them for productive and environmental safety of them.
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Geography for a Flat World | District Administration Magazine

Geography for a Flat World | District Administration Magazine | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
News, Articles and Community for district-level decision makers in K-12 education. Magazine published monthly, with daily news and blogs and online content. Archives available.
Joe Andrade's insight:

It is good to finally see that the education system is realizing that math and reading, although vital to education, are not the only subjects students will need to know in order to be successful in the future. Subjects such as geography, social studies and history are equally important when it comes to competing in the global market yet they are often overlooked in current curriculum.

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Schools downplaying geography lessons

Schools downplaying geography lessons | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

The Daily Rundown’s Chuck Todd takes a look at the National Geographic Bee and talks with host of the bee and of Jeopardy, Alex Trebek. Trebeck tells Todd that Americans are woefully ignorant when it comes to geography.


Via Seth Dixon
Joe Andrade's insight:

Alex Trebek explains the importnace of geography. Its not all about memorizing where things are, its understanding how and why location has such an impact on history, economy and politics.

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Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 12, 2013 3:27 PM
In Sweden we have the same discussion about geography in school. It´s easy to learn fact about countries but not so easy to develop the spatial thinking skills.
jfraley0032's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:24 PM

This is what ive been saying forever! Schools are leaving Geography out! Lets bring out some fun exciting Geography lessons (e.g. Geocaching, Find the box, geography posters, water testing, daily weather checks, even as simple as what to wear today for K-2nd.) Geography is coming back in Mrs. Jessica's Class ASAP!

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Russian Rocket Crashes After Launch

A Russian Proton-M rocket exploded and crashed seconds after it launched in Kazakhstan on Tuesday. (July 2)
Joe Andrade's insight:

200 million dollars worth of equiptment was lost after a Russian rocket crashed just after launching, an incident many people are saying is another in a string of recent Russian space program failures. There is further interesting insight in this article by the Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/russian-rocket-blast-threatens-next-space-station-launch/2013/07/02/285b1f22-e319-11e2-aef3-339619eab080_story.html

 

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Protests 'no Turkish Spring' says PM

Protests 'no Turkish Spring' says PM | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan again condemns the anti-government protests in Turkey, saying they do not constitute a Turkish Spring.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2013 7:48 PM

Many young citizens are accusing the Turkish government of becoming increasingly authoritarian and have taken to the streets as they fear that their secular society will follow more traditional Islamic values (just last week, the sale of alcohol was outlawed).  Over 1,700 have been arrested in 67 cities in these protests in the last few days.


Tags: conflict, political, Turkey.

Sarah Baker's comment, June 7, 2013 1:36 AM
That's no a good news. !
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Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

"Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2013 10:06 AM

I love Yann Arthus-Bertrand's photography; so many of them are geography lessons in and of themselves as he captures compelling images of the cultural landscape.  This particular gallery shows 32 stunning images including this one above showing urban agriculture in Geneva, Switzerland.    


"Worldwide, there are 800 million amateur farmers in built-up areas. In estates in south eastern Asia and some towns in central and South America, many people depend on this activity for survival. It’s the same story in Europe; in Berlin there are more than 80,000 urban farmers, and in Russia more than 72% of all urban homes till their own patch of land, balcony or even roof. Urban agriculture is on the [rise] and there could be twice as many people enjoying it within twenty years."


Tags: agriculture, foodlandscape, images, urban, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities

Chris Magee's comment, April 28, 2013 12:53 PM
Many of these pictures are eye-opening and really bring to light how differently things are done around the world. I was very interested when reading about the Palm Jumeirah artificial island in Dubai. I have heard and seen this project before but never knew the ridiculous amount of money and labor which went into it. As an American it is an odd phenomena to see something another country is doing and think "Wow, that's a little excessive/unnecessary." when I am so used to other countries always saying that about our actions. The "massive" amount of imported labor used for the project could have been put into their own country instead of paying other countries workers to build the resort.
The Crew's curator insight, November 7, 2013 10:12 AM

I think that urban farming goes to show how people adapt to their environment regarding agricultural practices. People are breaking the bondage of the stereotypical idea that you can"t farm in the city. However, in this article, we see that citizens are conforming to their environment to make the best agricultural use of land. -Scout

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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Joe Andrade's insight:

These photos offer a glimpse of our growing global population. Its quite intersting to see just how densley populated our planet can be in some places.

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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:36 AM

This should definitely be a major concern for the human planet becasue if people are multiplying that quickly and staying alive longer than the futre could be facing some serious problems. For example; the food supply could run low, shelter could definitely become scarce, diease could become a high risk becuase there are so many people that are close which means they could be sharing a number of things. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 6:58 PM

This is just a clarification that the world population will continue to grow bigger and bigger, and along with that UN projects will increase. 

AmandaWilhiteee's curator insight, August 27, 10:03 AM

I did not have time to read all of it, but what I did read astounded me. I had mo clue that  some of these countries suffered from overpopulation so badly. And in other countries, like Greece, their population has dropped by what seems like a small amount, but is actually a lot if you think about it. AW :)

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History of Israel and Palestine in VERY Easy To Understand Maps

History of Israel and Palestine in VERY Easy To Understand Maps | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Very easy-to-understand maps of the Arab-Israeli Conflict and the changing maps of Palestine and Israel (History in maps: #Israel and 'Palestine' http://t.co/wCKZCv4Bvn)...

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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Mapping America: Every City, Every Block

Mapping America: Every City, Every Block | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Browse local data from the Census Bureau's American
Community Survey, which was conducted from 2005 to 2009.

Via Sabrina Conroy
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Urban Agriculture Grows Up: Rooftop Greenhouses and Vertical Farms

Urban Agriculture Grows Up: Rooftop Greenhouses and Vertical Farms | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

A wave of rooftop greenhouses and vertical farms captures the imagination of architects while offering an alternative to conventional cultivation methods.


Community-gardening advocates have sold urban farming as a sustainable local alternative to industrial-scale farming and as an educational platform for healthier living. And municipalities are buying in, adopting urban ag to transform vacant lots into productive civic assets.

In the last two or three years, however, entrepreneurial urban farmers have opened a new frontier with a different look and operating model than most community gardens. Their terrain is above the ground, not in it. Working with help from engineers, architects, and city halls, they have sown rooftops and the interiors of buildings worldwide. “There’s a lot of activity right now, and there is huge potential to do more of it,” says Gregory Kiss, principal at Brooklyn-based architecture firm Kiss + Cathcart.


Visit the article link for more on recent innovations in urban agriculture and vertical farming...


Via Lauren Moss
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jean-guy Jais's curator insight, July 3, 2013 10:30 PM

very interesting

Zé Estrada Ar's comment, July 8, 2013 1:51 AM
Fortunately I live in a country filled with big farms, but it's a good iniciative.
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Words Matter: How Geospatial Education Suffers Because of Government Classification

Words Matter: How Geospatial Education Suffers Because of Government Classification | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it

"Recent news stories discussed why geography is important to an informed and engaged society.  To those of us in the geospatial profession, basic geography education is an essential foundation to encouraging young people to enter the workforce in surveying, photogrammetry, GIS and other disciplines in our field."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 29, 2013 11:20 AM

While many in the geography education business bemoan student's lack of global awareness as a rationale for geography education, this is the key angle that I feel we should be pushing: the workforce.  We currently are not producing enough students with geospatial skills in the United States to fill the jobs (one of the problems with geography being classified as a social science).  Now that is a practical reason to support geography that non-geographers can understand.


Tags: labor, geospatial, edtech, geography education,

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 8:00 PM

In a world of information the knowledge of geography is lacking.

Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 10:43 PM

Defining "geospatial" is still a convoluted mess.

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Occupy Newfoundland and Labrador: Tuition rates and geography

Occupy Newfoundland and Labrador: Tuition rates and geography | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Tuition rates and geography. I'm playing around with some numbers to try to better understand what level of tuition is appropriate at Memorial University. There are lots of ways to approach the question.
Joe Andrade's insight:

Interesting insight into one way geography can affect the way we live. According to this article even today it may still have a profound affect on our education.

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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


Via Seth Dixon
Joe Andrade's insight:

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

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Dania's comment, September 7, 2012 12:47 AM
This is an excellent way to teach everyone about scale … I love it… I got a better view and compare of how things look like, plus those naked eyes cannot see. Things that I heard and learned in science class but I couldn’t image it, now I saw a picture and it gave me a better knowledge. This will be a great tool for teaching many students.
Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 2:38 PM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Six Infographics for Independence Day

Six Infographics for Independence Day | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
The Declaration of Independence, signed on July 4th, 1776, is both a symbol of American liberty and an enduring monument to the philosophy of America’s

Via Dennis T OConnor
Joe Andrade's insight:

Some interesting information for the fourth of July wekend. These infographics incorporate elements of history and geography, taking a look at people and places of the past and present. From the original thirteen colonies to all fifty states and the habits and traditions of different regions of the U.S.

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Tony Gough's curator insight, July 6, 2013 8:53 AM

What's important about the USA constitution?

Tracy Bodzioch Feighery's curator insight, July 7, 2013 8:48 PM

I'd like to be able to teach students to create infographics using course content.

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Insight: Thinking about Tanking

Insight: Thinking about Tanking | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
With the rise of the knowledge economy, many occupations and businesses have seen unprecedented growth, as the business environment within this new economy is favourable to certain types of jobs. O...
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Ghosts of War

Ghosts of War | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
The remarkable pictures show scenes from France today with atmospheric photographs taken in the same place during the war superimposed on top.

 

In this fastinating set of images, Dutch artist and historian Jo Teeuwisse merges her passions literally by superimposing World War II photographs on to modern pictures of the where the photos were originally taken.  This serves as a reminder that places are rich with history; to understand the geography of a place, one must also know it's history (and vice versa).   

 

Tags: Europe, war, images, historial, place. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 30, 2013 3:02 PM

Incredible to see this kind of work.  I really hope this helps people remember what happened and what was given up in World War II.  As we lost more vets every day, we really need to make sure their scarifice is not forgotten.  Incredible piece of work here.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 12:56 PM

Historian Jo Teeuwisse creates dramatic imagery by overlaying negative images onto current images. These World War II photos show how different things were at the time and how people walk these streets everyday and may not even think twice about the streets history. Art is the best way to show emotion, and Jo Teeuwisse's art imposes a creative take on this.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:26 AM

I'm not even sure what to say about this set of pictures exactly, except that they're a very cool way to see history. I'm interesting in Social Studies and history because I'm captivated by seeing the world framed in a story, and these images do just that. To see the same places where the war was fought and what has changed is great, but these photos also give the impression of some stories of war. The idea of them being "ghosts" gives the impression of something left behind which marks the land even to this day.

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London WWII Blitz map is live

London WWII Blitz map is live | Todays News, Tomorrows History | Scoop.it
Read the latest London stories, London WW2 Blitz map is live on ITV News, videos, stories and all the latest London news
Joe Andrade's insight:

This new app combines geography and history in order to create an interactive map of London. It is an interesting opertunity to be able to see the Blitz come to life, it allows people to understand what actually happened and the destruction that was brought on by the second wold war. 

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