Geographical Processes
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Urban growth takes heavy toll on native animals

Urban growth takes heavy toll on native animals | Geographical Processes | Scoop.it
Eight koalas have been hit by cars in the past month near the town of Gisborne, 10 kilometres north-west of the Melbourne boundary.
Sophia Songberg's insight:

This article is for the urban growth and decline geographical issue.

 

Eight koalas have been hit by cares in the past month near the town of Gisborne. These horrific injuries to native animals have become commonplace since intensive housing development in the country town and the neighbouring Melbourne growth suburb of Sunbury. These areas could grow even bigger with new government promises. This means that with more housing there also come more car, cat and dog accidents. People are stating that the new government should educate residents on how to co-exist with wildlife and keep preventive zones between housing and habitat and that expansion should only be when completely necessary and are trying to caution drivers to slow down.

 

The spatial dimension is Australia especially the rural areas near Melbourne. The ecological dimension is that humans are continually building and expanding cities where in turn destroys those habitats of native animals. They also are the ones driving who are harming the koalas. People are responding by getting signs and telling drivers to slow down, helping the animals and stating to the government that residents should be educate on how to co-exist with wildlife, that there needs to be preventive zones between housing and habitats, and stating that expansion should only be when completely necessary.

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Spatial Inequality in Australia

Spatial Inequality in Australia | Geographical Processes | Scoop.it
What Is Spatial Inequality? Spatial Inequality is a major geological issue that's affecting the whole world, including Australia. Spatial Inequality can be defined as the uneven distribution...
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This article is for the spatial inequality geographical issue.

 

This article discusses spatial inequality in Australia, uneven distribution of resources and different standards of living. Australia is one of the best countries in the world with a very good economy but spatial inequality is increasing, as the population is. It is a problem as different areas have unequal amounts of services e.g. public transport and Aboriginals. NSW has the most obvious spatial inequality and especially in Sydney. The average number of people in poverty in Australia is 12.4% while in Sydney it is 14.3%. The main reasons were that in NSW there are less job opportunities and higher costs for houses. Other areas in Australia where this issue also occurs a lot is in Western Australia.

 

The spatial dimension is all of Australia, especially in Sydney, NSW, also WA and other rural areas. The ecological dimension is that humans aren’t sharing the resources and all aren’t donating to charity etc. to fix this problem. Their racism also is expanding and making this problem worse. People are responding by raising money for charities to help the unprivileged, by helping address shelter, food, water, education, emergency relief and skills training issues. Some of these organisations include the Salvation Army, World Vision and St. Vincent De Paul. The Australian government is also trying to improve this issue.

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Coastal erosion battle escalates

Coastal erosion battle escalates | Geographical Processes | Scoop.it
The battle to save some of the state's most spectacular beachfront properties from severe erosion is set to escalate.
Sophia Songberg's insight:

This article is for the coastal management geographical issue.

 

Coastal is a major issue that is threatening many coastal places, especially Byron Bay. Coastal erosion is caused by both engineering works and severe storms. Sea level rises, due to climate change, is also expected to caused by severe coastal erosion and affect numerous properties near them. Home owners in the area are vulnerable as they are being told to make sure that their houses are able to be removed or demolished if erosion becomes more severe. However, owners they are getting their lawyers to send more letters to the local council to ask if they are allowed them to protect their homes instead. The government is developing a policy that protects public properties as rises in sea level from climate change will result in more erosion. This doesn’t include private homes, so more legal battles are occurring.

 

The spatial dimension is Byron Bay, Australia and also other coastal cities and towns. The ecological dimension is that humans have caused climate change due to their use of technology and thirst for power, which increases the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This has caused a rise in sea levels and severe storms. Engineering works by humans have also caused coastal erosion. People are responding as these home owners in the area are getting their lawyers to send more letters to the local council to ask if they are allowed them to protect their homes. The government is also developing a policy that protects public properties as rises in sea level from climate change will result in more erosion

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Air pollution linked to heart disease: study

Air pollution linked to heart disease: study | Geographical Processes | Scoop.it
Exposure to polluted air increases the risk of heart disease and stroke by speeding up the hardening of the arteries, according to new research.
Sophia Songberg's insight:

This article is for the air quality geographical issue.

 

Each year the deaths from air pollution are double the deaths from road toll. New research has shown that exposure to air pollution increases the risk of heart disease by speeding up the hardening of the arteries. Fine particles, from coal mining and the burning of petrol and wood, are highly dangerous as they go deep into the lungs. If our air pollution was decreased and/or stopped then there would be health benefits.

 

The spatial dimension is Australia, mainly in the big cities, like Sydney. The ecological dimension is that humans, their technology and thirst for power, including cars, mining and factories, pollute the air, with their wastes and fumes etc. People are responding by stating that Australia should implement policies that reduced traffic pollution and have tougher air quality standards.

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Water management a disgrace, says Henry

Water management a disgrace, says Henry | Geographical Processes | Scoop.it
Australia's record on water management has been a disgrace, Treasury secretary Ken Henry says in a scathing critique of the nation's environmental bungles.
Sophia Songberg's insight:

This article is for the land and water management geographical issue.

 

Water management in Australia, the driest inhabited continent has become a ‘disgrace’. Water extraction from the Murray-Darling Basin in recently amounted to 93% of the average natural flow to the sea. Inflows into the Murray-Darling have been below average. 'In three of these 10 years, water extraction actually exceeded inflows. There has also been environmental destruction as a consequence of fishing, hunting, forestry and farming practices.

 

The spatial dimension is all of Australia, especially those areas with lacking water supply e.g. the Murray-Darling Basin. The ecological dimension is that humans are the ones who are destroying the natural land and water, through fishing, hunting, forestry and farming. They are also the ones who are draining the Basin for water. People are responding by stating and acknowledging that something needs to be done. The government and other officials are also debating about what can be done to fix this problem.

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Beyond recycling: making waste obsolete

Given our rapid depletion of resources, especially raw materials, and Australia’s ever-increasing waste creation, it’s time to ask: what are the best ways to encourage resource recovery and recycling to…...
Sophia Songberg's insight:

This article is for the waste management geographical issue.

 

This article discusses the worldwide movement and concept of ‘zero waste’. There is a rapid depletion of resources and raw material and increasing waste in Australia. Producing waste isn’t good for the environment or for the economy, as it is a waste of materials paid for. ‘Zero waste’ changes the way people design, build, maintain, operate, dissemble and recycle products and infrastructure, as it means no unnecessary waste at any stage in a product’s life cycle. Recycling isn’t necessary as the focus should be on not creating waste in the first place. The Australia Government is also passing the ‘Extended Producer Responsibility’ legislation to make producers responsible for their products entire life cycle to improve recycling rates.

 

The spatial dimension is all of Australia. The ecological dimension is that humans produce large amounts of wastes that end up going to landfill, if they can’t be recycled. They are also depleting resources especially raw materials. People are responding by stating that something needs to be done to recover our resources and produce ‘zero waste’. Nay Australian states are running recycling schemes e.g. South Australia with their successful money-back container recycling scheme. The Australian government is also about to pass the ‘Extended Producer Responsibility’ legislation. This makes producers responsible for their products entire life cycle, thus, improving recycling rates.

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Air quality in Sydney breaches safe levels 19 times

Air quality in Sydney breaches safe levels 19 times | Geographical Processes | Scoop.it
Sydneysiders endured 37 days of high air pollution last year, with air quality breaching national standards on 19 days, says the NSW opposition.
Sophia Songberg's insight:

This article is for the air quality geographical issue.

 

Air quality is Sydney is very poor as it has breached the national standards on 19 days. (It is considered to be poor with it reaches 100+ on the Air Quality Index) It is a major environmental and health issue with human health due to it costing more than $4.7 billion every year. Last year Sydney was recorded as the city with the dirtiest air in Australia. Every child has a right to breathe clean fresh air and it is irresponsible to ignore the big cost on human health. Therefore the government should be responding to the issue.

 

The spatial dimension is Sydney, a major city in Australia. The ecological dimension is that humans, their technology and thirst for power, including cars, mining and factories, pollute the air, with their wastes and fumes etc. People are responding by stating that the NSW government should be responding to the issue as it is a ‘distressingly bad’ situation. The NSW government should be addressing traffic congestion, the lack of public transport or protecting native vegetations instead of blaming dry weather and motorists. Better air quality monitoring systems and zero tolerance of increased emissions in Sydney are needed.

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