Geographical Issues
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Coastal erosion battle escalates

Coastal erosion battle escalates | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it
The battle to save some of the state's most spectacular beachfront properties from severe erosion is set to escalate.

Via Lauren Majarres, Rachel Palmer
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Lauren Majarres's curator insight, July 17, 2013 7:58 PM

There has recently been major coastal erosion threats around the beaches at Byron Bay, where local residents are now threatening to involve the state government. Local home owners have sent local council letters demanding they be allowed to protect their properties before the erosion issue becomes worse, where their properties would then have to be removed or demolished in the case of severe erosion. 

Montana Meucci's comment, July 23, 2013 10:09 PM
Recent erosion has significantly engulfed the beaches at Byron Bay. If the situation worsens properties may have to be removed or demolished, hence, landowners affected by coastal hazards can seek approval of their local council to construct works on their land to protect their property.
sasha nicolas's curator insight, July 28, 2013 7:29 PM

there has been threats of erosion on Byron Bay.

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Environmental impacts of dredging and other sediment disturbances on corals

Environmental impacts of dredging and other sediment disturbances on corals | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it

Via Merri , Rachel Palmer
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Merri 's curator insight, July 19, 2014 12:16 AM

 Exploration of the impact of dredging intensity and frequency on coral.

 

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Melbourne will be Australia's biggest city by 2037

Melbourne will be Australia's biggest city by 2037 | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it
MELBOURNE will overtake Sydney as Australia's largest city within three decades, with a lack of housing in NSW driving migrants south.

Via Lauren Majarres, Rachel Palmer
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Lauren Majarres's curator insight, July 22, 2013 3:08 AM

By 2037, Melbourne is expected to take over as being Australia's largest populated city due to the shift in economic fortunes. It is predicted that Melbourne's population will reach by 2037, 5.7 billion. The report says the five major problems with planning in NSW are high regulatory risk, high development levies, under-supply of development sites, lack of support for large projects, and landlord market power.

Grace Macpherson's curator insight, July 27, 2013 11:41 PM

It is forcasted that by the year 2037 Melbourne will overtake Sydeny as Australia biggest city. Victori is booming and thought to be on the upward spirral, yet Sydney with it's lack of and unafffordable housing is on the downward spiral. If this were to happen, Sydney and Melbourne would ultimately suffer, with sydneys lack of people and Melbourne's influx of People. Poeple's need for more housing and money has caused this problem as now people are struggling to find suitable houses or space. This article has not specified but generalises it to the city of Sydney and Melbourne.

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SA to get coastal management underway | ParlyReportParlyReport

The National Coastal Management programme starts with publication of proposals by the department of environmental affairs after a call for public comment.
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Spatial Inequality in Australia

Spatial Inequality in Australia | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it
What Is Spatial Inequality? Spatial Inequality is a major geological issue that's affecting the whole world, including Australia. Spatial Inequality can be defined as the uneven distribution...
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Coalition candidate supports waste dumping in Great Barrier Reef area

Coalition candidate supports waste dumping in Great Barrier Reef area | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it
Guardian Australia: LNP candidate for Capricornia says she would support dumping in world heritage area to enable expansion of coal port

Via Olivia Kim, Rachel Palmer
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Olivia Kim's comment, July 22, 2013 6:30 AM
i find it outrageous that 75.2% of the residence of the electorate of capricornia supported the dumping of waste in the Great Barrier Reef. I understand it would take a bit of time, money and might break some deals but i personally dont think it is a wise decision to make the great barrier reef a waste dump.
Sarah's comment, July 26, 2013 9:33 PM
LNP for Capricornia said that she would support the dumping of extra waste into our precious Great Barrier Reef. Though, 75.2% said that they would not agree to this. The dumping is being considered to enable expansion for a nearby coal port. The Ecological Dimension is human expansion and growth - through clearing land and jeopardizing nature for the sake of bettering off our supplies. The spatial dimension occurs on Queensland Australia and it affects a vast majority of sea water and world heritage site.
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Welcome to Envirosafe Solutions: Building a green future for Australian industry.: Waste Management: What is Waste?

Welcome to Envirosafe Solutions: Building a green future for Australian industry.: Waste Management: What is Waste? | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it

Via Envirosafe Solutions , Rachel Palmer
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Impacts on health of air quality in Australia

Impacts on health of air quality in Australia | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it
This report presents the results of an inquiry into the impacts on health of air quality in Australia, and makes several recommendations.

Via Chrissy Freestone, Rachel Palmer
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State of the World's Land and Water Resources for Food and Agriculture

State of the World's Land and Water Resources for Food and Agriculture | Geographical Issues | Scoop.it

Widespread degradation and deepening scarcity of land and water resources have placed a number of key food production systems around the globe at risk, posing a profound challenge to the task of feeding a world population expected to reach 9 billion people by 2050, according to a new FAO report published today.

 

The State of the World’s Land and Water Resources for Food and Agriculture notes that while the last 50 years witnessed a three-fold increase in food production, “in too many places, achievements have been associated with management practices that have degraded the land and water systems upon which food production depends.” [UN Food and Agriculture Organization, November 2011]


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