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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

I enjoyed looking at each shape of the countries and seeing howmany people lived in a certain area. To me it seems like the US has a lot of people living in a certain area compared to other countries states. It is also shocking that millions of people can live in a smaller area. 

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Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 12:15 PM

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:49 PM

The comparison of urban footprints certainly puts a lot of factors into perspective.  Whenever I am in highly populated areas such as Atlanta and New York, I feel like the area is so densely populated. But shift over to Sao Paulo which is so much smaller than New York, but just as populated.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

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» Great Ocean Road Bay Islands Victoria Australia Europe Geography | wallpapersdot.net

Victoria McNamara's insight:
Areas near the ocean create sea stacks like in the picture above. The sea stacks are formed from headlands that have separated and are pushed into the water. These sea stacks will not last forever they will eventually collapse due to the water. But more sea stacks will continue to be created overtime as they seperate from the headlands.
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 24, 2013 10:09 AM

The view from above is gorgeous! Nature's beauty at its finest. And to think that African slaves had escaped to go live at the mountain on this island, it's amazing. Although I wonder what resources did they have to make it there especially since the island is quite a distance from Africa?! Makes you wonder :)

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 11:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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Drainage Patterns

Drainage Patterns | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"The incredible fractal pattern rivers (now dried out) were made as they spread into the salt flats of the arid Baja California Desert in Mexico."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

This picture shows the drainage patterns and how the water drifted in many directions and not just in a single line. Water does not stay in a perfect straight line it flows and drifts in many directions. This is what the image is showing, how this particular water flows in many directions and branches off from one stream to another. 

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 9:52 PM

Describes drainage patterns in Baja California in Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:46 AM

The Earth is an incredible place, we all know that. To see something like this form by itself is a wonder on its own.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:15 PM

The photographs of the salt flats in the Baja California Desert reveal dried out rivers that may have once fertilized the area to be able to sustain life.

Human-Environment Interaction speeds up desertification and makes once fertile lands useless.

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Michael McElroy and Xi Lu on natural gas, fracking, and U.S. energy prospects | Harvard Magazine Jan-Feb 2013

Michael McElroy and Xi Lu on natural gas, fracking, and U.S. energy prospects | Harvard Magazine Jan-Feb 2013 | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Natural gas, the economy, and America’s energy prospects
Victoria McNamara's insight:

This article states the danger of fracking which is used to produce energy. Even though the people who are fracking say its not oing to harm anyone its effecting peoples heallth. The article suggests there should be procedures and policies to make it saffer for everyone around the fracking sites. 

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6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You

6 Ways Climate Change Will Affect You | geographic world news | Scoop.it
From the food we eat to the energy, transportation, and water we all need, a warmer world will bring big changes for everyone.

 

B Sinica: This article touches every aspect of geography from culture to climate [considering] how the growing population plays the biggest role in determining the future of life on Earth.  People need to recognize the problems and potential future issues with global warming and the rapidly changing environment.  Though not many issues can be prevented or even solved, the least we can do is try to lessen the severity of devastation and prolong the current conditions as much as possible before the world becomes too extreme to manage.


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Climate change is going to affect how we live in the future. It will cause lack of food, energy sources, health risks, climate changes, drought etc. It is because of our growing population and the amount of people the world has to take care of for all of us to survive. We are also using too many of its resources too quickly. What could we do now to try to slow down the process of it happening? 

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Peter Siner's comment, April 29, 2013 10:53 PM
The whole debate on climate change remains a highly debated issue. It’s hard to understand why since there are loads of evidence pointing to a warming earth. However despite the views of many there is an obvious need to help in reducing the pollution and disregard for our planet. Scientist are beginning to predict drastic changes to our surrounding environment. All of these changes are causing vegetable production to decrease which has an impact on the economy as a whole.

As our production becomes limited costs go up. Starvation rates across the globe are increasing our population increases and so this poses a global threat. Soon the rate at which we consume will be limited. Also energy consumption will be limited. This too will causes prices for essentially everything we utilize to increase. The problem with people as a whole is that we look to instant gratification and we generally want to solve issues that are right in front of us while we often pay little attention to much larger, but slower moving threats.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:22 PM
It is kind of a scary thought that global warming could greatly disrupt the way we live. Everyone is affected by it especially businesses like farms. The production of crops declines because of the excessive heat. Changing climate affect the length of each season which hurts the process of growing and harvesting crops. There would also be a change in the production, storage and transportation. It will cost more money to properly manage these businesses. This change will not only affect companies and how we handle our food but also our way of life and health. We would all have to adapt to such drastic changes in the environment which may be a struggle for some. Health wise, if it is too hot and people are not well adapted then it could lead to hospitalization and increased health risks. I don’t think there is much we can do to lessen the severity because it is a natural cycle of earth. I do think we may have sped up the process a little bit, for example car exhaustion and greenhouse gasses. But we are so dependent on such technology we can’t just make it disappear.
Dillon Cartwright's comment, May 3, 2013 4:04 PM
It's crazy that something like a little climate change can change the affect the entire world. Not just in one way either, it affects the world in many ways, like the 6 mentioned above. I don't think people realize the frailty of the environment they live in. Something as small as someones car exhaust becomes kind of a big deal when there are hundreds of millions of cars in the world.
In addition to that, I think it's great that life expectancy has gone up with cures to diseases and advances in modern medicine. It's a good thing that people are living longer lives, but it's a problem when these people aren't environmentally conscious. If there is going to be a consistent increase in population, there should also be an increase in environmental awareness so everyone can work together in slowing down this destructive process.
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Maldives

Maldives | geographic world news | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Maldives might be hard to keep for many years due to the fact that it is in the middle of the ocean. Eventually overtime the waves would ruin whatever is on that land. It does not seem like a pratical place to live. 

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 4:19 AM

The Maldives are an extremely interesting case of physical geography. They are made of coral and sands which the oceans have deposited on the coral skeleton of the islands. The ringed shape of the islands suggests there was once something in the center of the them which either receded into the ocean or eroded away leaving only the hardened coral rings behind.

 

Economically, the fairly unique nature of these tropical islands makes them an excellent tourist destination and Maldives has a significant tourist industry. Unfortunately, the unique physical geography of the islands makes them extremely vulnerable to tsunami and rising sea levels. If global warming raises the ocean levels a few feet, the majority of the islands will be flooded permanently.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 6:51 PM

Although they are a country that relies on tourism for their economy, they still limit the number of tourists in respect for the Muslim population of the islands. Unfortunately, geology of the islands puts them in danger of rising sea levels without much of a solution for protection.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:48 PM

Boy would I love to visit the Maldives. What an interesting and beautiful island it is.

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Bike Lanes


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Bikers in New York City should know better not to ride their bikes around the streets because it is so busy and the traffic can be difficult. I know people use bikes to commute to work or school but this is New Yorks job to create more bike paths for people who want to use their bikes to commute. This will be safer for people to ride their bikes whenever they want. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 4, 2013 8:30 AM

In a busy city like New York, there are never enough places for parking and lanes for traffic.  There is simply not enough space for the flow to be smooth and efficient.  Cyclists that attempt to assert their right to the street are often times referred to as cyclist activists or hipsters as though their activism or cultural differences makes them synonymous with an extremism that  is more easy to dismiss.  Many hold views that privilege a motorists right to space in the city above that of a cyclist.  I saw this tweet by a NYC cycling organization that referred to "activist drivers" who park in the bike lane as attempting to create a "guerrilla can lane."  They used the terms and language used against them and superimposed it on the larger motorist community which sees itself as having a more natural right to all space in the city.  This video embedded above is an excellent spoof and highlights the dangers of being a cyclist in a motorist-centric world.

    

Tags: transportation, cycling, urban, planning, territoriality, space.

Sofia Speranza's curator insight, October 10, 2013 2:10 PM

BIKERS. be aware of dangers on the street path

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:27 AM

I find this to be very true. I have gone to big cities such as Boston and New York and it is always chaotic. I find that there is always terrible parking in the big cities. Also it seems very dangerous for the average civilian trying to get to his or her job on a daily basis. Me not being from around the area found it difficult to navigate.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

I enjoyed looking at each shape of the countries and seeing howmany people lived in a certain area. To me it seems like the US has a lot of people living in a certain area compared to other countries states. It is also shocking that millions of people can live in a smaller area. 

more...
Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 12:15 PM

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:49 PM

The comparison of urban footprints certainly puts a lot of factors into perspective.  Whenever I am in highly populated areas such as Atlanta and New York, I feel like the area is so densely populated. But shift over to Sao Paulo which is so much smaller than New York, but just as populated.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

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figure2.jpg (415x546 pixels)

figure2.jpg (415x546 pixels) | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Victoria McNamara's insight:

This graph shows that th world over the years is slowly starting to produce more goods than there are people. Why do we need to produce so much extra goods? If more goods are being produced than we need then where are the extras going? This is wasting the resources we have when we produce too much. 

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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

For slavery to thrive you need a big business to produce goods for and a large amount of people to actually do the work for little or no pay. We can try to eliminate by having machines produce goods or paying the workers more and giving them better working conditions. Our spending habits are some what responsible because these slaves our producing our products for us for very cheap. 

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:14 PM

The under ground ecnomy can be a dark thing, with many illicet black markets for durgs, women, hitmen, and clearly slaves. In todays world while slavery is no where near as common as a century ago, it is still happening on a daily baisis in countries that dont have the resorces to protect all its citizens from that life.  Its discusting how people have been foced to live there lives like this for so long, that now more than ever we need to put a stop to the habbits that encourage this like big corperations with focred labor and many more, then the world will be free of slavery.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

If the pollution is getting worse in Hong Kong why is it not being addresed? What are the people in charge focusing on? To me pollution would be a very important thing to fix because it could cause deaths if it is not fixed and just continues to get worse. 

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 8, 5:11 PM

"Hong Kong permits the docking of ships that burn fuel with up to 3.5 percent sulfur content." This seems to be the number one problem to me. I thought the United States had pollution problems but according to this article it seems that the real pollution problems are in Hong Kong. The busiest loading port in the world, and they are letting ships come in and out that have 3.5 percent sulfur content. The United States and European countries only permit ships with 1 percent sulfur content. Does Hong Kong care about this problem, and what are they doing about it? A back drop of the city? They are blaming their screw up on Tropical Storm Trami saying that the storm decreased winds which they say "disperses pollution in the city."

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 13, 11:01 PM

This story is amazingly disheartening to me. It seems it is actually more important to some people to take a perfect vacation picture than address the real issue. I think this backdrop is very misleading to people who will view these pictures and should be a wake up call to those who pose in front of it. More should be done to decrease the pollution from fossil fuels etc.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 17, 8:50 PM

Seeing how Hong Kong is suffering from a pollution problem as severe as they are is interesting, but realizing that they need to disguise their problem with a backdrop of what the city skyline should look like for tourists. Hong Kong's geography and location was a contributing factor because of the surrounding bodies of water, the pollution was a result of tropical storm Trami and also made the haze worse in Hong Kong.

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."

Victoria McNamara's insight:

I think it is very important for people to have access to fresh healthy foods if its desired. Living in cities can cause this to not happen as much due to location. More of the fresh foods are produced outside of cities in rural areas. By growing plants in this green room in a city it gives people access to fresh foods. 

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 1:28 AM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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Breakfasts Around the World


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 11, 2013 3:01 PM

Looks lke all of these are in some way combined to be an American breakfast.  Since this country is a melting pot you mihgt just get a mix of breakfast foods from different cultures in one American breakfast.  You can have have the English eggs, over easy it looks like, with a French pastries.  A full mix of culture and you might still me in pj's.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | geographic world news | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Overtime as the population has increased you can see on the map that areas have been over fished. This has caused people to move near the water to fish and it has created some jobs for them. This could be bad becuase as the population increases the fish will decrease due to the over fishing. 

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:59 PM

This really shows how the worlds oceans are being fished out and something has to be done about it before this map even worse.

 I think more pressure has to be put in places like the UN on the guilty countries to slow fishing down around the world.

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:42 PM

Useful for consideration of Fish as a resource in the topic Natural Resource Use in Global Challenges. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:11 PM
its scary to see how much fishing grew over the pat years due to the growing population
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The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River

The 7,000 Streams That Feed the Mississippi River | geographic world news | Scoop.it

" A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution)."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

The Mississippi River flows down the east side of the United States. Since the river is so long it has many streams that expand off it it as well. As you can see in the picture the red parts are the sections where the water has branched off the Mississippi River. It takes up almost all of the middle section of the United States. 

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Taki Toto's comment, August 10, 2013 11:48 AM
taki
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:20 AM

INland water environments

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 9:40 PM

Land use is different around Mississippi River basin.

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World's Hurricane Tracks

World's Hurricane Tracks | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"170 Years of the World’s Hurricane Tracks on One Dark and Stormy Map."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Hurricanes are most frequent in the late summer early fall season. This is because the air and water are mixing cold and hot temperatures and this is what forms the hurricanes to happen. This map does show that the most often hurricanes are near India and China etc. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2013 10:00 AM

What physical forces create hurricanes?  What spatial patterns are evident? How does this map impact settlement patterns or hazard mitigation efforts? 


Tags: physical, disasters, environment.

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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Fracking is happening in some peoples backyards and it is effecting how they live. People are directly in this unhealthy atmosphere. It is causing bad things to happen to peoples health. It is especially ruining their water which is needed to cook, drink, and clean. Water is needed in our everyday lives to survive and fracking is contaminating their water. 

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

Kuzi's curator insight, October 20, 9:42 AM

The visual example explained the procses

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | geographic world news | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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Urban People...City People - Page 7 - Historum - History Forums

Urban People...City People - Page 7 - Historum - History Forums | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Originally Posted by mastershake16 I believe the US trend is different. If someone has a chart like that, I think it would be interesting to see. At
Victoria McNamara's insight:

By viewing this graph we can see that more population growth is in cities then rural reas. It keeps increasing over the years as well. This could be because of more job oppurtunities. 

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

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Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, September 4, 2013 8:59 AM

I definately need to get out more! Good excuse for travel!

 

harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:03 PM

It is really sad that there wasn't a plan in place already for diabled people in such a time. However I don't think that the city of New York should be fined for it. This poor planning most likely exists all around the U.S and this was an eye opening experience as to what needs to be done for the future. Any money they are fined should be used towards a relief program or for a plan for future crisis's. However instead of fining them I think the government should order a new plan of attack for the futre, and all of the money should be put into that plan. The city might be able to create a sort of transportation sytem for disabled people or even warn the city earlier next time. It is tough to accomodate everyone in a crisis because there is so much commotion goin on, but I do belive that there can be a better plan put in place to make sure everyone has a fair shot to evacuate. No person should be stranded because of a disability. New York needs to put their money into creating a plan of attack for the future and other states need to follow suit so that we can prevent something like this in the future. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

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Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | geographic world news | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Beijing has one of the worst pollution issues in the world. The pollution is from the factories and burning coal and not filtering factories so the pollution goes out in the air. In the image you can see the city of Beijing and the factories located in the back and they are both in competition with each other. 

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:18 PM

Beijing's Pollution is depicted throug this picture which shows that the factory is the equivalent of the "yello brik road" in this instance because it is where everything happens and where all the work is done and then the city landscape is depicted as cold in the dark grey scale. It depicts not only the spacial regognition but the actual, socitetal views on each place in relation to eachother.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:52 PM

It is a beautiful image until you read what it is actually depicting. It is very sad that a nation would choose money over the health of their citizens.

Glenn Cades Colada's curator insight, May 8, 7:36 PM

Beijing's pollution.

 

This is very interesting because it comes to show how humans have evolved and how they don't really care about the Earth's atmosphere.

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A Satellite’s View of Ship Pollution

A Satellite’s View of Ship Pollution | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Elevated levels of nitrogen dioxide pop out over certain shipping lanes in observations made by the Aura satellite between 2005-2012. The signal was the strongest over the northeastern Indian Ocean.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Ships are causing pollution all over the ocean because of its fuels being used. Is there other fuels we can use for ships? By finding a safer fuel it could reduce the oceans pollution. Pollution probably effects the wildlife and drinking water as well and we often eat foods and drink from the water. It not only effects the ocean it effects us as well. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 2013 4:39 PM

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, remote sensing, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.

David Collet's curator insight, February 19, 2013 10:37 PM

The Straits of Malacca show up as a highly affected band - and this from traffic that is not even bound for, or related to, Malaysia.

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USDA ERS - Corn: Background

USDA ERS - Corn: Background | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Corn is a product frequently used in the United States that goes in almost everything we eat. We use it to feed our cattle, create added sugars, corn oil etc. Our country produces so much corn because it is cheap and allows us to increase the food being produced. 

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Can Milk Sweetened With Aspartame Still Be Called Milk?

Can Milk Sweetened With Aspartame Still Be Called Milk? | geographic world news | Scoop.it
By adding artificial sweeteners to flavored milk, the dairy industry hopes to boost flagging consumption in schools.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Foods we eat in our society today are rarely freshly grown without using some type of chemical. Everything we eat and drink has been processed to taste a certain way and last longer. By sweetening milks children will want it more because it tastes better but it technically is not real milk if it has added sugars. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2013 1:47 PM

The very definitions of food are being rewritten as modern industries reformulate the products on our shelves and what we put into our bodies.  What cultural and economic forces are driving these changes? 


Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.

Kev Richards's curator insight, March 8, 2013 2:57 PM

Good example of how a real food turns into an artificial variation of a real food. Shame that kids don't even like milk! That's the parents fault. All kids like milk from birth (of course) so what turns them off?

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:49 AM

In my opinion I believe that the milk companies are trying to add sweeteners to their products in order to increase sales. So many drinks now are containing such things as aspertame. However I don't agree with putting it in a childs milk unless it is made known. I understand the milk company's argument that no one else has to put it on the front of the label, but I think that is because those products were not known to be made without aspartame so most people consuming the product would check. However in order for milk to keep up with competitors it has to take a step in the direction of adding sweeteners to their products. However I think they should have to state artificial sweeteners on the front of the product if it is still called milk. However if they change the name to something other than milk then I would say it would be fair to put artificial sweeteners on the back. Kids comsume drinks all the time with artificial sweeteners, so I still think milk would have sales if people knew there were artificia sweeteners in the milk. But trying to hide it is unfair. People should be made known what they are consuming in their milk, especially since it has been around for so long and is considered a healthy choice for kids. Lastly I think if such a product is put in schools that kids should have the choice between regular old fashion milk and the artificially sweetened milk.