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Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | geographic world news | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 17, 2013 5:06 PM

Amazing to see that mother nature can and will destroy just about anything that we can build.  We know where there are flood plains and we know that flooding will occur.  What we might not know, fail to see, or just completely ignore, is how devestating these floods can become.  It seems to be a cost benefit analysis.  Cheaper to build and rebuild rather than building somewhere else maybe??  Does it seem to make sense?  Why are they still ancient Roman works still standing, and in use today?  Did they just build it better or did they just build in the right location??

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Drainage Patterns

Drainage Patterns | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"The incredible fractal pattern rivers (now dried out) were made as they spread into the salt flats of the arid Baja California Desert in Mexico."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

This picture shows the drainage patterns and how the water drifted in many directions and not just in a single line. Water does not stay in a perfect straight line it flows and drifts in many directions. This is what the image is showing, how this particular water flows in many directions and branches off from one stream to another. 

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Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 3, 2013 9:52 PM

Describes drainage patterns in Baja California in Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:46 AM

The Earth is an incredible place, we all know that. To see something like this form by itself is a wonder on its own.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:15 PM

The photographs of the salt flats in the Baja California Desert reveal dried out rivers that may have once fertilized the area to be able to sustain life.

Human-Environment Interaction speeds up desertification and makes once fertile lands useless.