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Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Geography in the News: World Fisheries

Geography in the News: World Fisheries | geographic world news | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM DECLINE IN OCEAN FISHERIES The world may be running out of places to catch wild fish.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Overtime as the population has increased you can see on the map that areas have been over fished. This has caused people to move near the water to fish and it has created some jobs for them. This could be bad becuase as the population increases the fish will decrease due to the over fishing. 

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Louis Culotta's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:59 PM

This really shows how the worlds oceans are being fished out and something has to be done about it before this map even worse.

 I think more pressure has to be put in places like the UN on the guilty countries to slow fishing down around the world.

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:42 PM

Useful for consideration of Fish as a resource in the topic Natural Resource Use in Global Challenges. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:11 PM
its scary to see how much fishing grew over the pat years due to the growing population
Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | geographic world news | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Bolivia is the first Latin-American country without a Mcdonald's present there at all. These people would prefer to eat their delciious varities of foods than eat fast food. This is an important example every country should look at. We all eat so much fast food and never stop to realize how much delicious food our countries have and stuff we can easily make at home instead of feeding our bodies with fast food. 

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 11:29 AM

I absolutely love this! Here is a country that takes a lot of pride in eating fresh foods. They do not have any fast food chains because Bolivians prefer their traditional foods just the way they are. They still eat hamburgers but prefer to buy them from women who make them instead of a McDonald's. Bolivians value that interaction and relationship with the people surrounding them and that genuinely makes food more enjoyable. Their food relationships do not involve money but the effects of what these fresh foods can do for them. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 28, 5:50 PM

This is a fine example of people looking out for one another.  It might be easier to industrialize their food market but it's more admirable to preserve tradition, help small indigenous business, and try your best at making the country more healthy.  I applaud them for doing this.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 3:33 PM

I think I might want to move to Bolivia one day! Reciprocity is often a term used for corporate culture; you but from me and I'll buy from you type of relationship. This is still true in Bolivia only they do it on a much more personal level. Farmers share equipment, they share crops, seeds and develop a rapport not easily undone by corporations such as McDonald's. Bolivia's multiple micro-climates allow it to grow a wide variety of foods for their citizens, thus making it easier to trade within their circle of neighborhood farmers. "I'll trade you ten pounds of potatoes for five pounds of Quinoa."

The article goes on to state that Bolivians do indeed love their hamburgers, a handful of Subway's and Burger King's still do business there, but the heritage of picking a burger from a street vendor has been passed down by generations. These cholitas, as they are called, sell their fare in the streets of Bolivia and this type of transaction is not easily duplicated by large corporations. I have added Bolivia to my bucket list...