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Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:03 PM

It is really sad that there wasn't a plan in place already for diabled people in such a time. However I don't think that the city of New York should be fined for it. This poor planning most likely exists all around the U.S and this was an eye opening experience as to what needs to be done for the future. Any money they are fined should be used towards a relief program or for a plan for future crisis's. However instead of fining them I think the government should order a new plan of attack for the futre, and all of the money should be put into that plan. The city might be able to create a sort of transportation sytem for disabled people or even warn the city earlier next time. It is tough to accomodate everyone in a crisis because there is so much commotion goin on, but I do belive that there can be a better plan put in place to make sure everyone has a fair shot to evacuate. No person should be stranded because of a disability. New York needs to put their money into creating a plan of attack for the future and other states need to follow suit so that we can prevent something like this in the future. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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World's Hurricane Tracks

World's Hurricane Tracks | geographic world news | Scoop.it

"170 Years of the World’s Hurricane Tracks on One Dark and Stormy Map."


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Hurricanes are most frequent in the late summer early fall season. This is because the air and water are mixing cold and hot temperatures and this is what forms the hurricanes to happen. This map does show that the most often hurricanes are near India and China etc. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2013 10:00 AM

What physical forces create hurricanes?  What spatial patterns are evident? How does this map impact settlement patterns or hazard mitigation efforts? 


Tags: physical, disasters, environment.

Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | geographic world news | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 17, 2013 5:06 PM

Amazing to see that mother nature can and will destroy just about anything that we can build.  We know where there are flood plains and we know that flooding will occur.  What we might not know, fail to see, or just completely ignore, is how devestating these floods can become.  It seems to be a cost benefit analysis.  Cheaper to build and rebuild rather than building somewhere else maybe??  Does it seem to make sense?  Why are they still ancient Roman works still standing, and in use today?  Did they just build it better or did they just build in the right location??

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.