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Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

All over Germany specially in Berlin you can find many varieties of foods and restaurants that were influenced by many countries all over the world. A very popular dish the currywurst is fried German sausage with American ketchup and India curry powder. This dish was influenced by two other countries and was opular during WWII. The dish is still very popular today because of its unique taste. 

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megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:23 AM

" Currywurst is a great example of globalization and how different cultures  and customs have made their way across the globe to other countries. They continue with their traditional customs but allow other cultures to migrate their way and blend with others. In this article the currywurst is a blend of Germany, The USA, and India by way of the UK. THe sauage is the German aspect, the ketchup is the USA, and curry is India's tradition,"

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 1, 2013 1:13 PM

I found this video to be very interesting. The video talks about Berlin's signature dish the currywurst. Currywurst is one of most well known dishes in Berlin, and is a dish the natives say every tourist should try. What was interesting to find was that the dish had elements from a few different places. Currywurst is made of pork sausage which and fried and cut into pieces. Pork suasage is a very widely used and popular meat that have in germany. However on the curry worst dish they put ketchup, which is very american like. They also sprinkle it with curry, which comes by way of India from Great Britian. It is amazing ti me that a country's signature dish has ingredients from two other countries! You would think that a signature dish would be made entirely of ingredients from their homeland. However the country is becoming more and more like other country adding sushi bars, soup kitchens, fast food, and etc. It just goes to show how much things have changed. Before country's were trying to use their own products as much as possible. Now we have such good transportation systems that people are moving to new places and food is being transported all over the world. Now we are at a point where even a country's signature dish uses products from many different country's. We have almost completely eliminated folk culture. It is almost sad in a way. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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Place and Flash Mobs

The idea of flash mobs has spread quickly, diffusing at a time when online video sharing can immortalize the moment in time and social media can amplify the audience beyond just one place.


Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

The people who were apart of this flashmob picked a very good place to do it. They decided to do it rightin the center of a town or market area where many people would notice them. They wanted everyone to focus their attention on them even if it was just for a few minutes. If they were to pick an are that was not in a city or town area not that many people would be gathered around and watching them. 

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Jimmy Power's comment, December 25, 2012 4:30 AM
Love it
Justin Cardoso's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:51 AM

we saw this flash mob in my first geography class and i just thought that it was amazing how many people gathered around to listen to the street performers.  i also love how it escalated so quickly from a single performer into a complete orcastra in a matter of a couple minutes. #georic

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:02 PM

I love the consept of a flash mob. How a planed performace can start in the steet and instantly people are attracted and engaged. They are done all over the world, but where the mob takes place is the important part. The location of the mob is more likeley to be in a popular city, or near a highly populated area (park, beach, ect..).  Its important to realize how something like this would serve no signicinace if it was done say at a shopping center in a surban town. Its also interesting to see what the message of the mob is, this video was more of just entertainment while some mobs have clear messages that there trying to comminucate to socioty.

Rescooped by Victoria McNamara from Geography Education
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A Satellite’s View of Ship Pollution

A Satellite’s View of Ship Pollution | geographic world news | Scoop.it
Elevated levels of nitrogen dioxide pop out over certain shipping lanes in observations made by the Aura satellite between 2005-2012. The signal was the strongest over the northeastern Indian Ocean.

Via Seth Dixon
Victoria McNamara's insight:

Ships are causing pollution all over the ocean because of its fuels being used. Is there other fuels we can use for ships? By finding a safer fuel it could reduce the oceans pollution. Pollution probably effects the wildlife and drinking water as well and we often eat foods and drink from the water. It not only effects the ocean it effects us as well. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 2013 4:39 PM

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, remote sensing, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.

David Collet's curator insight, February 19, 2013 10:37 PM

The Straits of Malacca show up as a highly affected band - and this from traffic that is not even bound for, or related to, Malaysia.