Geography
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7 Billion: Are You Typical?

Learn more about population: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/7-billion To coincide with the arrival of the world's 7 billionth person on October 31, 2011, ...

Via dilaycock, Sally Egan, Craig Day
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dilaycock's curator insight, March 3, 2014 1:35 AM

Whilst this clip from National Geographic is now over 2 year's old, it provides an interesting insight into the world's population. It also highlights that  describing something as "typical" or "average" often masks the reality.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 12, 2014 7:50 PM

An interesting insight into the World's population composition. It also highklights some of teh real differences which are oftern hiden amongst the 'average' data on global population.

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Stupid Americans answering about the World & Geography

විස්තර කියවන්න: http://sinhalabuddhist.com/2011/09/stupid-americans/
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Geography: What is it for?

This animation is designed to help teachers to tune into the grand narrative of Australian Curriculum Geography.
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What If?

What If? | Geography | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 

 

Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 11:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 6, 2012 12:50 AM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 8:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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What each country leads the world in

What each country leads the world in | Geography | Scoop.it

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Via Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV), Craig Day
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CDC: Lifespan more to do with geography than genetics - USA TODAY

CDC: Lifespan more to do with geography than genetics - USA TODAY | Geography | Scoop.it
Tech Times
CDC: Lifespan more to do with geography than genetics
USA TODAY
Living in the Southeast is bad for your health.
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President Obama on Geography Education

President Obama participated in this year's National Geographic Bee to to "celebrate the important role that geography plays in all our lives."  During that event he made a statement that I think geographers should use more.  Go to 0:45-1:10 in the video clip to hear this message or see the transcript below. 

 

"The study of geography is about more than just memorizing places on a map. It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents. And in the end, it's about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together."   

 

-President Barack Obama

 

Tags: Geography, GeographyEducation, video, geo-inspiration.


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GIS student's comment, September 9, 2012 10:24 PM
This is a great step for America. Nothing better than the President of the United States pushing for Geography and Geography Education. President Obama tells us what geography really is about, "It's about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exists across continents." This is something that every student should know because without appreciating diversity and culture, how can one truly be American, a land where diversity is its heritage.
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Geography Of Africa

This edition of Mr. Zoller's Social Studies Podcasts provides an introduction to African geography.
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