Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië
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Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië
Actualiteit in de les ak bij het onderwerp Zuidoost Azië Ashram College 4vwo
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48 iPad Apps for Teaching and Learning Geography / Earth Science | iPads in High School

48 iPad Apps for Teaching and Learning Geography / Earth Science | iPads in High School | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
"After a year or two of tinkering and experimenting with apps for teaching / learing Geography, I have (finally) compiled this list of what I deem to be the most useful iPad apps for teaching Geography.
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Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Burma The Plaid Avenger: April 2012–A Tsunami of Changes in Burma NY Times Video: Motorcades and Disneyland for Dictators The Economist: A Burmese Spring? NPR podcast: Myanmar’s Isolati...
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Website van seth dixon met veel geografisch materiaal per thema en regio.

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Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India

Rapes Cases Show Clash Between Old and New India | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
A boom and social change are pitting young working women in the city against men from conservative villages.

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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:41 PM

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:16 PM

I was most shocked by how Americanized these individual were. I understand that the Philippines were under American control for a fair period of time, but the country obtained its sovereign independence of the US sometime in the mid-40s. They have had close to 80 years to develop their own history, yet the author mentioned the citizens were still watching shows like “Friends” and speaking American English better than other foreign English speakers. It just goes to show how a colony is permanently marked by their past. I am not entirely sure this is a good thing, but at least one positive that came out of the US’s impact is that in speaking more American English there are more call center jobs. As the article mentioned, the jobs helped their sluggish economy. Still, the only reason these jobs are being offered is due to the amount companies save. Not only do the companies avoid paying American workers, whose salary is much higher, the companies are also in an area with better infrastructure. So even though the article claims the companies paid more because the Philippine workers cost $50 more than those from India, they save money on overhead and have better satisfied customers! Looking at call centers from the company’s perspective shows that this former colony is just a pawn once again. Therefore, when we look at intent, globalization just becomes negative again.   

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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

Cyrena & Chloe's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:43 PM

GEOGRAPHY: North Korea, although one of the smallest nations in the world, is still arguably the most defiant. They're completely cut-off from the outside world, and they've displayed this once again by not selling Coke in their borders. Being a classic American drink, Coca-Cola is likely viewed as an enemy to North Korea, judging by their hatred of America and its citizens. They're one of only two countries in the world not to sell Coke, and this just goes to show that even though they're physically connected to us, they are isolated from the world.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 7:06 AM

Coca Colas return to Myanmar signals a change in the history of that country. The recent democratic reforms in the nation have made it a nation that can be attractive to major international cooperation's.  Coke will likely be the first of many international cooperation's that seeks to return to this market. Often, democratic reforms are initiated  in the hope that it will make the nation attractive to outside businesses.

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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 

I've used similar videos in my classes and students are usually quite shocked to see how a city like Bangkok, Thailand operates.  I've used this as a 'hook' for lessons of population growth, urbanization, economic development, sustainability, megacities and city planning. 


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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:15 PM

On the one hand this disturbed me. All I kept thinking when I saw the people go back on the tracks is that they could easily be killed.In fact, I wonder how many accidents have ever occurred near this area. All it would take is some sort of malfunction on the train in which the horn wasn’t sounding to provide ample warning or someone gets in another person’s way so there isn’t enough time to close down the shop. On the other hand, this made me realize just how efficient a population could become at using space. Everything was timed so that the entire area moved out of the way without an issue. So rather than let any land go to waste, the area uses it despite the risk to its population. Though it really isn't like the population has a choice though. So in instances where there is such overpopulation, it is interesting to see how well the society can adapt to the phenomenon. I do wonder what would happen if the country becomes more developed and the population declines. Would this type of land continue in the future or be disband? I know that in our country there are many laws that would make this illegal, but our country also has the space avoid developing the land in such a manner. When comparing it to the laws of the United States, I would think the country would eventually drift away from this use of land when possible. However, now that I watch the video, I have a new appreciation for maximizing land and I hope that the efficient could continue. Just in a less scary manner. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:51 PM

Talk about using every inch of space available to you.  I find this video crazy not only because of the safety hazards, but just how people seem to go about this like it is normal.  This would never take place in America!

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:29 PM

An absolute amazing dynamic is seen in this video.  To say that Bangkok is trying to use most of its open space up would be an understatement.  In developed countries, you would not only never see this happen but you would not even see a thought of doing something like this.  There are violations every where you look.  

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Obama doubles up on Myanmar visit

Obama doubles up on Myanmar visit | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it

DE: Obama's visit to Myannmar shows the country is prepared to take a pro-democratic and anti-Chinese stance in the future. As they open up borders with their neighbors Bangladesh, the Buddhist Burmese appear likely to end their human rights violations against the minority Muslim population and other dissenters. This economic revival that they are planning accompanied with the recent Parliamentary elections, won by the democratic party, have Burma posed to become a much more democratic state in the near future.


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How to Feed the World?

a film directed by Denis van Waerebeke for the « Bon appétit » exhibition, aimed mainly at the kids aged 9 to 14. written by : Sabrina Massen & Denis van Wae...
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Everything You Need To Know About Train Travel in Southeast Asia

Everything You Need To Know About Train Travel in Southeast Asia | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Southeast Asia has become an easy destination for independent travelers: buses and planes literally crisscross each and every corner.
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Laos May Bear Cost of Planned Chinese Railroad

Laos May Bear Cost of Planned Chinese Railroad | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
China wants a railroad linking it to Thailand and on to the Bay of Bengal in Myanmar, but some international groups warn that it may put a big burden on Laos.

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TopoSite (topo leren door oefenen): Topografie Topografie Azië (Rusland, China, India, etc)

TopoSite (topo leren door oefenen): Topografie Topografie Azië (Rusland, China, India, etc) | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Topografie test oefenen Wereld - Azie (Rusland, China, India)
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Topo Azië leren: even terug naar de basisschool....

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South East Asia Timeline (3500 BC - 2005 AD)

http://www.timemaps.com/history/south-east-asia-30bc
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Indonesian capital paralyzed by floods - World News - Castanet.net

Indonesian capital paralyzed by floods - World News - Castanet.net | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Indonesia's army deployed rubber boats in the capital's business district on Thursday to rescue people trapped in floods that inundated much of the city of 14 million people.
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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
The Chinese New Year is an important holiday in Chinese culture. In China the holiday is known as the (Happy Chinese New Year! http://t.co/h2xMXcHc)
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What can you do with geography?

We all know that geography is important; but what can you do with it?

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Aardrijkskunde's curator insight, January 9, 2013 7:47 AM

Wat kun je allemaal met Geografie? Leuk filmpje!

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BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest

BBC: Development-How bottles bring light to world's poorest | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
A simple initiative in the Philippines is bringing a bit of brightness into the lives of the country's poorest people.

 

This clip is brimming with classroom potential.  Development is a key component to this clip, but it could also become a service learning project as students adopt a great project to help others in more difficult financial situations.  Learn more about the project at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:31 PM

This is very innovative as people in the Philippines have found a way to light their homes with just a plastic bottle. Using bleach and water and a piece of metal, there is temporary light for many people who would otherwise live in darkness. Starting with just 1 bottle in 1 home, this homemade product's total is now 15,000 units. I was very impressed that something as simple as a bottle filled with water can cost just $1 to make and give off even more light than an average light-bulb. I predict that this mini invention will become even more widespread as more poor countries catch on to this new, resourceful idea. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 2015 3:45 PM

The solution to a problem in this video owes itself to geographical factors, had this been a problem in the US, the solution would have been different.  Having said this, the "American Way" to solve problems isn't always the best way to do so.  The Philippines is a collection of islands and they are ravaged by hurricanes, so to put above ground powerlines would be highly expensive, and to connect the whole nations infrastructure would require the nation running very expensive powerlines underneath the ocean.  What the man does in this video is ingenious given the location and the solution to the problem.  Since the Philippines are a warm country and the houses only have a single roof layer, by cutting a whole in the roof taping a coke bottle into the whole (filled with water and a bit of chlorine) allows a cheap and effective source of light.  By doing this, the people will not have to spend a great deal on electricity (if it is in their region) and if they do not have electricity then they still have a source of light. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:26 PM

what a genius! of course as mentioned in class this works in the Philippines because of the tin roofs and the climate. You could not do this in cold places because the water would freeze. but this is just another sign that communities figure out ways to survive. What works in one place isn't always good for others but this sure works here.

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Turbulence on the Mekong River

Turbulence on the Mekong River | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
The Mekong River was once a wild and primitive backwater. Today, growing demands for electricity and rapid economic growth are changing the character of what is the world's 12th-longest river.

 

Economic progress for some often entails job loss and environmental degradation for others.  The once isolated and remote Mekong is experiences some impacts of globalization with residents having mixed feelings about the prospects. 


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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 8:03 PM

It seems to be a theme that across the bored, people are building things that directly and negatively impact the environment and the local people. There are always two sides to the problem. On one hand, the dam can help with the development of Laos because it will bring in money, but it will also destroy the fish population and therefore many fishermen will lose their jobs and people will lose a food source. It is a difficult problem because Laos needs money because there is a lot of poverty in this rural country and the fishermen do not add a whole lot to the economy, but the people need a way to survive and make money for their families as well. It's a problem that I think will be around for generation to come.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 11:35 AM

Seems the price of modernizing will be the local economy that as existed here for centuries.  It is not a small industy either, it is according to the report a billion dollar fishing industry.  However with a growing population and a demand for electricity the river is the perfect source for this power.  This globalization, like all globalization, will help some and will hurt some.  What you have to ask yourself is will it help more than it hurts?  Will it help in the long run, over time?  For everyone involoved in globalization these answeres are never the same everywhere.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:21 PM

The Mekong river is a river that many fisherman in Laos depend on for food and income. Plans to build dams that will cause the fish to seek an alternate route to migrate upstream. Critics of the dams say that the dams will cause the fish to abandon the Mekong river and go through their neighboring rivers, leaving the residents without a source of income. Many in favor of the dams say the reverse, that building the dams will boost economy and cause the area to flourish.

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Photos of Southeast Asia

Photos of Southeast Asia | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it

This is an incredibly photo gallery of Vietnam (pictured) and Cambodia.  The photographer, Michael Poliza, has many other place and nature-based galleries at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/poliza/sets/ ;


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:59 PM

If I had a helicopter I would certainly be taking it out to see stuff like this. Vietnam is very natural looking. Its lands are filled with awesome demography and topography. What a beautiful sight to see.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 2015 5:31 PM

These are amazing photos of Vietnam and Cambodia.  It shows a different perspective of how many people see these countries, either from stories or on the news or forms of media.  Its completly different than the rice patty filled areas and the pictures of poverty striken people, extremly dirty and starving to death.  It jus shows that if people dont reach out themselves to find out the truth of masny places in the world, they are only going to believe the stereotypes that they are showed on television.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:23 AM

These photos show the true beauty of the landscape and culture of Southeast Asia.  They're some of the most unique places and traditions that you will ever lay your eyes on.  Beautiful!

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Asia's rise -- How and When?

"TED Talks Hans Rosling was a young guest student in India when he first realized that Asia had all the capacities to reclaim its place as the world's dominant economic force."

 

Regions, cultures and economies are not static in this era of globalization.  However, in the United States we are accostumed to a position of prominence that is assumed to be a 'birthright.'  The data presented here shows how countries such as India and China might "catch up" to the United States and United Kingdom later in the 21st century (2048?). 


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cookiesrgreat's comment, April 12, 2012 1:54 PM
India could out pace China in the Global Market, but it needs to address its infrastructure, Islam-Hindu conflict and become a first world country not a third world sidekick.
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Toerist is goud waard voor inheemse volken

Toerist is goud waard voor inheemse volken | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Inheemse culturen worden steeds aantrekkelijker voor toeristen die op zoek zijn naar authentieke ervaringen. Inheemse volken kunnen daarvan ...

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Emiel Mulder's curator insight, January 15, 2013 4:30 AM

Mooie aanvulling bij culturele antropologie. Zijn er alleen maar voordelen?

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Ian Storey: China's Game Plan in Southeast Asia

Ian Storey: China's Game Plan in Southeast Asia | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
In Brunei, Beijing will try to scupper South China Sea cooperation without driving states toward the U.S., writes Ian Storey in an op-ed for The Wall Street Journal Asia.
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Indonesia: FDI rolls on

Indonesia: FDI rolls on | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
With economic nationalism and government interference on the rise in the run up to Indonesia’s elections in 2014, investors keep complaining about the deteriorating investment climate.
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Grinding Nemo - Southeast Asia's Dying Oceans - The Real News Network

Grinding Nemo - Southeast Asia's Dying Oceans - The Real News Network | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
Grinding Nemo - Southeast Asia's Dying Oceans The Real News Network Pacific island nations have called for greater control over destructive fishing methods and overfishing, which they say are threatening our ecosystem, the life of local fishermen...
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Kaart landen Zuidoost-Azië: Kaart landen Zuidoost-Azië, Indochina, Soendaeilanden

Kaart landen Zuidoost-Azië: Kaart landen Zuidoost-Azië, Indochina, Soendaeilanden | Geografie - aardrijkskunde - Zuidoost Azië | Scoop.it
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Afbakening van de regio Zuidoost Azië 

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Southeast Asia's Best Countries to Live in 2012

Southeast Asia's Best Countries to Live
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