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NYTimes: In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find Skyrise

NYTimes: In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find Skyrise | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
An unfinished skyscraper occupied by squatters is a symbol of Venezuela’s financial crisis in the 1990s, state control of the economy and a housing shortage.

 

Incredible paradigm shift as a skyscraper is converted from a symbol of wealth is occupied by squatters.  The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with  problems in the rural countryside.  A complex web of geographic factors need to this most fascinating situation.  The video link "Squatters on the Skyline" embedded in the article is a must see.

 


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:
The fact that one resident featured in the video said she has "nothing to complain about" says a lot about the housing situation in Caracas. She didn't seem to think she deserved to live in a better environment- instead she accepts the unfinished skyscraper with rudimentary services and no sewage removal. It is a shame that Caracas hasn't been able to meet the housing demands of their growing population. I'm sure the issue is more complex, but it seems like this oil-rich nation should be able to build proper housing for its citizens. Also, 2,500 squatters is an astounding figure. Just to put it into perspective, my neighborhood (in Providence) has a total population of 2,669. I can't imagine all of us being crammed into one building without electricity, air conditioning, or proper plumbing.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 9:49 PM

 Incredible paradigm shift as a skyscraper is converted from a symbol of wealth to a building that is occupied by squatters.  The lack of a vibrant formal economy and more formal housing leads to a lack of suitable options for many urban residents--especially with problems in the rural countryside.  A complex web of geographic factors need to be explained to understand this most fascinating situation.  The video link "Squatters on the Skyline" embedded in the article is a must see.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 12:23 PM

Squatters occupy a building that was constructed to symbolize great wealth in Venezuela including a landing pad on the roof and floors to occupy office buildings. Due to a financial crisis, the building was never finished and squatters have taken advantage of this empty building. There is no windows, plumbing or an elevator to reach the higher levels of this skyscraper. Because of this, many safety issues have risen, including deaths. There is no other place for these squatters to live, it has become their home and they are temporarily making the best of it.

Geog 400- Regional Gography
North America, Mexico, Central America, Caribbean, South America, Europe, Russia
Curated by Stacey Jackson
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6 hours in Jakarta

Sure it's a camera commercial,but it provides a stunning look into life in the Indonesian capital of Jakarta. 


Via syarifah dalimunthe, Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This commercial is a beautiful and authentic look at Jakarta. I love the detail you gather from the piece-- from the bicycles to the fish market to the man selling watches. It gives you a sense of the people who inhabit the city as well as the culture, economy and infrastructure of Jakarta.

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Video: Fighting Poverty with Ingenuity

I absolutely love creative, out-of-the-box, innovative people! People who use their creativity to make a difference in the World.... Incredible! "We want to ...

 

Find out more about this organization at: http://isanglitrongliwanag.org/

 


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

When you watch this video and consider the standard of living for the average U.S. citizen, you really see there is such an uneven use of natural resources in the world. I wish more people here were able to use renewable energy more creatively. It's interesting how having fewer financial resources can often lead people to innovative uses of materials they have at hand. Before urban gardening was a trend in the U.S., my husband's grandfather used to recycle plastic buckets to collect water to water his garden. He didn't have a lot of money, but he did have a lot of ingenuity. 

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 9:29 PM

It is people like the man in this video that help many people and their families fight off poverty , if even by a little. He says that his electric bill has gone down significantly since he installed the water bottle bulb. While we think nothing of the empty soda bottles we throw away, we never realize that it could brighten up a families house and allow them to save  some money to perhaps buy themselves or their children clothes or shoes, or more importantly food to eat. This is a truly genius way of help out your community and give the world ideas on how to reduce using large amount of electricity.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 4:31 PM

This another fantastic example of people in areas of little and poverty making due with that they have on hand. While many in America can imagine life without our modern necessities in fact both historically and contemporary people have always determined ways to get the fullest extent out of the materials at hand. This video shows how innovation and some common good is able to help the whole community. We in the Western World can definitely learn a few things from situations such as this.   

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 10:49 PM

Poverty stricken areas are filled with very intelligent and skilled people who are trapped in their economic status. These solar bottles show how creative people can be no matter where they come from. Furthermore, these types of innovations show how the sadness of living in poverty can be lifted a small amount with recycling and creativity.

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Bangladesh: Facing the Challenge

Global warming does not impact all areas equally, and in the future the less environmentally resilient countries will be at increasingly at risk.  Bangladesh, as a flat area prone to flooding, is especially vulnerable to anthropogenic climate change.  However, Bangladesh has implemented many changes in the cultural ecology to make sure that they are using the land differently to strengthen their environmental resilience.     


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

It was inspiring to see people in Bangladesh use ingenuity to adapt to climate change. Considering the nation's vulnerability to the effect of climate change, the introduction of solar panels, rain water harvesting and other techniques is essential. Maybe if other countries had the same sense of urgency, we would be making greater progress in terms of reversing climate change.

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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 10:08 PM

When I think of innovation Bangladesh is not a place I think of. Yet they are coming up with innovative ways to deal with the global climate change. It is sad they are so effected by something they did not cause. 

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Doctor Outlines West's Role in India's 'Brain Drain'

Fitzhugh Mullan, a professor of health policy and pediatrics at George Washington University, says the West undertrains doctors and nurses, creating a vacuum — "an irresistibly appealing vacuum to ambitious, well-trained people in the developing...

 

The best educated Indians are incredibly well-suited to migrate to other countries for better-paying jobs in other regions.  What are the interregional impacts of this process? 


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This must be a challenging issue for India to address. More people from the country are being educated at top medical universities, but they are not returning to the country to live and work there. This affects India's ability to advance its economy but also the health of its citizens. In a way, it reminds me of Rhode Island, where many well-educated and talented young people leave for jobs in other states after going to college in Providence.

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Christianity and Traditional Religions in Colonial Africa

Christianity and Traditional Religions in Colonial Africa | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Missionary activities in Africa provided a fertile ground for conflict between christianity and traditional African religions.
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Inside disputed Western Sahara

Inside disputed Western Sahara | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Local Sahrawis complain of abuses and say international community has ignored their plight under Moroccan rule.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

 

Western Sahara, a former Spanish colony, has been ruled by Morocco since 1975. Since that time, "hundreds of thousands of Moroccan settlers were encouraged to enter Western Sahara with state-subsidised property and employment, under the army's protection." Morocco fought a war against an indigenous Sahrawi group of fighters, the Frente Polisario, which ended in 1991 when "the UN brokered a ceasefire and pledged to hold an independence referendum within six months." Tewnty-two years later, the Sahrawi are still waiting for the independence referendum to be held.

 

Recently, Sahrawi activists have held protests which have ended in violence and even death at the hands of Moroccan soldiers. Lahib Salhi, an activist leader, said: "We live here always under the eyes, and under the clubs of the Moroccans. The world must do what it promised to do when the UN first came: hold the referendum, and give us the chance to live as we wish to live."

Many Sahrawis are equally disenchanted with the international community. "The Moroccans make the claim on our land because they can, because they are strong and because they are supported by France, the United States, and Britain," said Salhi. "But they know the claim is false. The Mauritanians once claimed Western Sahara for themselves. Where are they now? How much longer will the world permit this injustice?"

 

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Lacking Schools, an Army of Women Teach Kibera’s Youngest – The Informal City Dialogues

Lacking Schools, an Army of Women Teach Kibera’s Youngest – The Informal City Dialogues | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Every weekday morning, they rise before dawn to educate their neighborhood’s children, without pay, in a school they built themselves.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

"In Kibera, a two-square-mile informal settlement in Nairobi where half the residents are under 15, educational opportunities are hard to come by. It’s the city’s most densely populated area, a campaign hot spot for politicians and presidential aspirants, yet the schools and students within it remain largely unrecognized and unsupported by the Kenyan government. Faced with this vacuum of formal schooling, it is local women, often armed with no more than a primary-school education themselves, who teach Kibera’s next generation with an indefatigable sense of mission."

 

"The Kenyan government has made primary education a national priority; the sector, at times, has consumed around 30 percent of the national budget. This commitment was reinforced in 2003 when primary schools throughout the country were made free for the first time in history. Since then, Kenya has added 7,000 new public schools and seen a 46 percent increase in enrollment. Due to Kibera’s informal status, however, the settlement’s youth populations and teachers remain largely excluded from the expanding education opportunities that are felt in other Nairobi neighborhoods."

 

"A 2009 Oxfam report found that about 75 percent of Nairobi’s slum residents have received a primary education, mostly due to innovative efforts by schools like St Martin’s. (Kibera has only about half a dozen formal schools — not nearly enough to serve its whole population, the exact size of which is unknown)."

 

"A class curriculum can be found near each of St. Martin’s volunteer teachers, tailored to reflect those issued by the Ministry of Education. These standards are a way to keep Kibera’s children competitive if they’re ever able to access a formal education, the teachers say."

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Interactive Map: The Battle for Syria – The Battle for Syria - FRONTLINE

Interactive Map: The Battle for Syria – The Battle for Syria - FRONTLINE | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
The mass protests that began in the rural farming town of Dara’a in March 2011 have since spiraled into nationwide war.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This interactive map charts the conflict in Syria. The towns that appear in red on the map designate a massacre site. Because "Syria has largely barred western journalists" most of the reports, photos and video footage are coming from Syrian activists. Modern technology has made it impossible for atrocities to occur without the knowledge of the international community. And with so much evidence, they can not be covered up as they might have been only a few years ago. 

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Fighting for Iraq: A regional powerplay

Fighting for Iraq: A regional powerplay | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Learn more about the ethnic, religious and political powerplays in and around Iraq during a virtual tour of the region led by NBC’s Richard Engel.

 

This is an incredibly well-put together, video/slideshow about the complex geography of within Iraq that has lead to so many difficulties in the post-Saddam Hussein era.  The ethnic patterns, religious divisions, spatial arrangements of resources as well as the larger regional context all play roles in creating the a contentious political environment.


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Although I try to keep up with world events, Iraq has puzzled me. This was spectacularly helpful, although I still don't feel like I have the full picture. For instance, I understand that three ethnic groups were forced in to a new country, Iraq, after World War I and that the country has been in turmoil ever since. However, these ethnic groups were all a part of the Ottoman Empire before there was an Iraq, so why did the trouble start after the formation of Iraq?

 

These ethnic groups had their own provinces within the Ottoman Empire. I'm assuming these groups thought they'd establish their own separate nations after the fall of the Ottoman Empire, but were not given the chance to decide for themselves since Iraq was a product of "European powers." If this is accurate, then European nations have a horrible track record when it comes to dictating foreign boundaries that lead to unrest abroad. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 11:35 PM
I have always felt that Iraq is very complex. And it is. However the videos shed some light on clarifying what most of the turmoil is about.
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:33 PM

I enjoyed this video. I never really understood why these groups were fighting. It was an easy video to understand and I learned that the fighting is not just about religious but cultural differences as well. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 12:55 PM

Iraq is a complicated country. The current differences and disparities in culture, ethnicity and resources has led to some harsh rivalry between people within the borders of the country. This shows how borders can be artificial and just because a map shows a region as one unit, it is not always the case. After the Ottoman Empire fell many groups of people were thrust together and this is why we see these divisions so clearly.

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Lava rivers flow from Russian volcano

Lava rivers flow from Russian volcano | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
The Plosky Tolbachik volcano in East Russia, is one of 29 on the Kamchatka peninsula, and has been erupting since last November.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Earth is an amazing place. The Plosky Tolbachik volcano in Russia has been erupting since last November. The footage of the lava slowly rolling over/mealting the snow is really cool.

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The end of nature?

The end of nature? | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
It isn’t the first time I’ve been to Usinsk in the very north of Russia, so I shouldn’t be surprised — but once again, I’m shocked.

 

An interesting look at some environmental issues in the far north of Russia (and when Russians think that it's far north, it's REALLY far north).


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This story is being told again and again around the world. Major corporations swoop in, take over natural resources, make enormous profits, completely devastate a region and destroy a way of life for indigenous people. The documentary Crude (2009) tells the same story of oil spills destroying a community in Ecuador and their struggle for justice.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:13 AM

It's horrifying to see such a large space go to such waste thanks to toxic oil spills. Business / people have no respect for nature. This space could have been used to build homes, start a new business , or even for agricultural purpose. The government should step in and clean this up because this land can help boost their economy as well if they put it to good use. It's mind over matter! They need to get to work on this ASAP!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 11:35 AM

I never thought of the impact of on-land oil spills, usually it's only something I'd think occurred in the oceans, but I understand now that oil spreading throughout the soil and forests can have an effect just as disastrous.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 9:42 PM

(Russia topic 5 [independent topic 1])

Russia's blind eye to environmental regulation hasn't stopped at Lake Baikal. Sadly the Siberian landscape is being destroyed at an unimaginable scale by careless oil operations. Companies well known even here in the U.S. like Lukoil and Shell are running operations that aren't just harming the environment... they're eradicating it. Even disregarding all of the political tensions, it is shameful to note how one's morality, one's instinct's, one's sense of heart, one's common sense haven't kicked in by now. It's one thing for a nation to exploit itself, but when universal things (such as the environment) which are inarguably are ruined, there lies an even more severe sense of immorality and beyond-monetary "debt" owed to the rest of the world.

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The BRICS Cities Sprouting Multimillionaires the Fastest

The BRICS Cities Sprouting Multimillionaires the Fastest | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Some of the world’s fastest-growing pockets of wealth are in five cities you may never have heard of.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Five BRICS cities where "ultra high net worth individuals" (defined as people with net worth of $30 million or more, excluding homes) are growing at an extremely fast rate:

 

Chongqing, China

Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Novosibirsk, Russia

Pune, India

Durban, South Africa

 

I must admit I haven't heard of any of these cities before reading this article.It will be very interesting to watch these emerging markets evolve and possibly surpass old economic centers.

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Australia Adds New Colors to Weather Forecasting Chart as Temperatures Skyrocket

Australia Adds New Colors to Weather Forecasting Chart as Temperatures Skyrocket | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
As heat records continue to be shattered with every passing day, Australia's Bureau of Meteorology has updated its weather forecasting chart to reflect rising temperatures.

Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

It's unfortunate to see that climate change has become so bad that scientists are now re-working maps to reflect the increasing temperatures. As a geography student, I'd be interested to see this heat map side-by-side with a map on wildfires in Australia. My guess is there would be parallels. 

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:08 PM

They should just skip the middle-man and make "Hell" a color. Dry land, low rainfall, and the flows of El Nino all contribute to the intense heat found in Australia.

James Hobson's curator insight, December 8, 9:52 AM

(Oceania topic 5 [independent topic 1])

Those who argue that climate change / global warming is not occurring should just look at a map! Australia's addition of 2 temperature deviation ranges isn't just a random decision. Off-the-charts temperatures on a scale never experienced before in the area are the culprit. This seems to echo the decisions of many newspapers and television networks I've seen, which have added more colors to their temperature maps to compensate for the recent southwest heat wave and (you guessed it) the infamous polar vortex. after all, what good does a visualization map do if it's all just one or two colors? (Not to play devil's advocate, but it does go to show that changes are in fact happening.)

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Myanmar's Isolation Gives Way To A Flood Of Visitors

The rapid pace of political change in Myanmar in the past year — capped by the recent election of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi to Parliament — has tourists and foreign investors rushing to the country.

 

So many tourists want to see the change come to the democratic institutions of Myanmar to become a politically just Burma.  And yet, they also nostalgically want to keep Myanmar in a non-globalized state.  In what can be called the paradox of progress, many westerners want an idealized pre-modern state. 


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This article touches on something I've always thought about when considering tourism and development. Many of the cities and places I like to visit I go to because of there charm and lack of robust tourism culture. This is a bit of a dual edged sword. Cities and countries stand to gain considerable wealth from the expansion of their tourism industry. But, part of me wonders if something else is also lost. 

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 7, 2012 1:05 AM
What a transition. Burma is now free. After suffocating under military rule, Myanmar now has the chance of progressing politically and economically.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 8:03 PM

Due to rapid pace of political change in the last year tourists and foriegn investors are flooding into Myanmar. The country went through 50 years of brutal military rule and isolation that has left them stuck in time. What has been so heartbreaking for the people of Myanmar has is they same thing that makes it attractive and appealing to tourists and brings them now pouring in. Many of the tourists like it there because it hasnt been "ruined" by corporations and fast food chains yet.  

James Hobson's curator insight, December 4, 9:02 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 9 [independent topic 1])

Myanmar (aka Burma) might end up being the next 'hidden gem' that ends up being scratched by over-visitation and over-westernization. However, this is by no means set in stone (no pun intended...).  Just as locals don't want to spread word about their favorite swimming hole, many past visitors and some locals hope that they can maintain that which keeps Myanmar unique. On the other hand, the welcoming of change offers the lure of increased tourism revenue and further globalization to an area recovering from isolationism. In my opinion a balance should be reached, in which local culture is properly maintained while modest introduction of foreign culturals is done in an as-necessary, beneficial-majority-proven basis.

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Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students

Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Despite the country’s claims to be a sleek 21st-century meritocracy, the habits of centuries of discrimination and social exclusion are not so easily shaken.

 

India is modernizing at a rapid pace, but some old class problems rooted in the caste system are still visible.  This is part of a large series called "Breaking Caste" with some excellent videos, articles and personal vignettes to humanize the struggles of those at the bottom of the social hierarchy.   


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This was a very sad story to read. It's a shame that many Dalit students feel ostracized at elite Indian institutions, so much so some go as far as to commit suicide. This is a terrible personal loss for the families and neighbors of the students. But it also is unfortunate news for the country as a whole. India's economic and social growth likely depends on moving beyond old views on class and cate.

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Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:20 AM

This is interesting in that it's not some silent discrimination, but an extremely overt one where many of these people are being told to their faces that they will not be allowed to pass. My greatest respect goes out to those who fight the hardest for what they want and they must keep trying to achieve it, but sadly those in a position of power in the society were direct barriers to their progress, causing their hope to be lost and the Dalit students to commit suicide.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 4:38 PM

Even though the caste system was abolished, the habits of discrimination are still incredibly prevalent. Discrimination towards people from rural backgrounds at the country's elite colleges has had such an impact that dozens of students from what would have been lower castes are committing suicide. Professors look down on these students, refusing to offer aid and even changing grades so they fail. The aboriginal students that fail face lifetimes of debt and are worried about disappointing their family, so sometimes they take their own lives instead. 

 

Centuries of the caste system have imprinted itself into the Indian people. Since India has only been free of it for a generation, older people continue to discriminate. 

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Argentina : Climate

Argentina : Climate | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Country of South America, covering most of the southern portion of the continent. The world’s eighth largest country, Argentina occupies an area more extensive than Mexico and the U.S. state of Texas combined....
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Argentina is the only place in the Southern Hemisphere with an extensive portion of arid eastern coastline. This is caused by a rain shadow zone, which is created when air masses lose their moisture while passing over high mountains, resulting in dry, desert climate on the other side of the mountain range. The zone begins in the Andean Northwest and extends along the eastern slopes of the Andes southward to Tierra del Fuego. 

 

The rain shadow area has a central desert core rimmed by semiarid, or steppe, conditions.

 

Most of the arid region is subjected to strong winds that pick up sand and dust. This is particularly true in Patagonia, where windblown dust creates a continuous haze that considerably reduces visibility.

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Sudan's Once Great Train System Is Now in Utter Disrepair

Sudan's Once Great Train System Is Now in Utter Disrepair | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
The country once boasted Africa's largest network. Now much is out of service, thanks to mismanagement and neglect.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Sudan used to have "Africa's largest rail network" with over 3,100 miles of track connecting places like the Egyptian border to Darfur, from Port Sudan to Wau in what is now South Sudan. But decades of civil war have taken a toll on the railway and most of the lines are now (uderstandably) out of service. What is most interesting is that "the government, with the help of Chinese money and expertise," is working to restore the railway in Sudan. It will be interesting to see which routes they choose to repair and which are left to crumble. Also, the article does not mention whether the Sudanese and South Sudanese governments are working together on this project or not, but all of the images show South Sudanese travelers.

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Morocco to change rape marriage law

Morocco to change rape marriage law | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Government plans to outlaw practice allowing rapists to avoid charges if they marry their victims.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Moroccan activists are pushing for action on a comprehensive law combating violence against women that has been "languishing in parliament for the past eight years." The suicide of a 16-year-old girl who was forced to marry a 23-year-old man who raped her has outraged many and is seen as "the last straw" for concerned Moroccans who say violence against women must end in the region.    

 

 

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Jordan reels over Syrian refugee crisis

Jordan reels over Syrian refugee crisis | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
Jordan launches urgent appeal for aid after 20,000 Syrian refugees cross into country over past seven days.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Jordan's only Syrian refugee camp has exceeded its 60,000-person capacity. More than half of the 285,000 Syrian refugees that have fled since March of 2011 are now in Jordan. The large influx of Syrian refugees is straining the country economically. "Jordanian officials say they need urgent funds to build two further camps to host an additional 50,000 refugees."

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High court keeps Israeli, Palestinian spouses apart

High court keeps Israeli, Palestinian spouses apart | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it

An Israeli high court ruling has left at least one family angry, frustrated and in limbo because the husband, an Israeli citizen, will be forbidden legally from living with his Palestinian wife.

 

Legally stuck between a rock and a hard place.  I fear that this couple is the living embodiement of some of the possible outcomes for peace talks and cooperation in the region. 


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Laws like this are not only tearing families apart, but they are also creating more tension in a region that really doen't need any help in that department. In order for these families to stay together, it seems their only option is immigration, which is difficult and costly.

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cookiesrgreat's comment, March 13, 2012 9:17 AM
You may agree or disagree with Israel building a wall to keep regular Palestinian's out or terrorists, but by building a legal wall to keep two people who are married from living together is creating a terrorist state.
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The Battle for Syria – FRONTLINE

The Battle for Syria – FRONTLINE | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
FRONTLINE journeys to the heart of the Syrian insurgency
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This is an amazing series by FRONTLINE.

 

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EU delays action on pesticides ban

EU delays action on pesticides ban | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
EU nations are unable to reach agreement on European Commission proposals to ban the use of three pesticides that have been linked to the decline of bees.
Stacey Jackson's insight:

Although some European countries, like Italy, have banned neonicotinoids at the national level, the EU is having a hard time convincing other countires to commit to the ban. This is just one example of an issue that the EU has had difficulty reaching a consensus on.

 

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France makes it harder to become French

France makes it harder to become French | Geog 400- Regional Gography | Scoop.it
France will be making it harder for foreigners to seek French citizenship as of January. Critics say the new requirements, which include tough language tests and allegiance to “French values”, are an electoral ploy that panders to the far right.

 

Tighter immigration policies often correspond to the election year cycles as politicians recognize that the changing cultural profile during economic struggles has political currency.   


Via Seth Dixon
Stacey Jackson's insight:

This seems unsettling after reading the article "NYTimes-No Babies? - Declining Population in Europe." It seems like some countries are paying for certain ethnic groups to have babies while telling others to "get out." Borderline ethnic cleansing-esque?

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