Geofactualidades
85 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
onto Geofactualidades
Scoop.it!

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Pedro Damião's insight:

Excelente recurso para as aulas de Geografia.

more...
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

Geofactualidades
Geographies from here and from there
Curated by Pedro Damião
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon, dilaycock
more...
Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:19 AM

water

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Maps - Africa is much better educated than it used to be

Maps - Africa is much better educated than it used to be | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

Africa is much better educated. From my project: http://bit.ly/1LkBD7X pic.twitter.com/6kfNCzx0ML


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Chart - More EU companies acquired by Chinese ones

Chart - More EU companies acquired by Chinese ones | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

More European businesses are coming under Chinese ownership http://econ.st/1ylEogn pic.twitter.com/AJAvnC57Yd


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island

Tide Makes Tombolo an Island | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
The historic abbey of Mont Saint-Michel became an island on March 21 after a rare “supertide” flooded a causeway.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 2015 11:23 AM

Coastal physical geography produces some beautiful landforms such as tombolos.  A tombolo is created when sand deposits attach an island to a larger piece of land--think of it as special type of isthmus.  Mont St. Michel (picture above) is the world’s most famous example because of the iconic walled city with crowned with a striking medieval abbey.  As the tides fluctuated, the city and abbey were alternately connected or disconnected from the mainland.  However, a ‘super-tide’ that occurs once every 18.6 years wiped out the artificial causeway stranding motorists on France's most visited tourist destination (I wouldn't mind be stranded there right about now).  


Tags: water, physical, coastal, geomorphology, landformsFrance, tourism.

West Sound Tech Assn's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:32 PM

Not techy but very cool!

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 5:24 PM

this was interesting mother nature shows us once again that she is in control by showing us how easily our seemingly strong structures can be swept away    

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cartographically Inspired Fashion

Cartographically Inspired Fashion | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

I found this on pinterest (where else?) and decided to share the geographically inspired craftiness:

1. Paint your nails white/cream
2. Soak nails in alcohol for five minutes
3. Press nails to map and hold
4. Paint with clear protectant immediately after it dries.

This also works with newspaper, but don't try it with NatGeo Maps because the paper is of too high a quality to have the ink bleed out; I would recommend using an old USGS Topo map. 

 

Tags: fun, art.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mrs. B's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:13 AM

Yes to map fashion! I saw a woman with a map skirt - so cool. MAPSMAPSMAPS!!!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 2015 11:34 AM

I heart maps!  I cant wait for spring break to try this :)

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gaëlle Solal's curator insight, April 1, 2015 12:58 PM

ça vous en bouche un coin?!

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM

This shows the costums that several other Countries use in north America we cross our legs but in Countries Like Asia disrespectful. In America we view blowing or Noise is normal in Japan that Considered rude

Roman M's curator insight, April 16, 2015 12:17 PM

This article shows the different customs on gestures or body language in the world. What we might do is disrespectful in another country. For example, even some as simple as crossing your legs while sitting is common in North America and some European countries. However, it is viewed disrespectful in Asia and the Middle East.

RM

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Looking For Real-World Math Problems? Try Google Earth!

Looking For Real-World Math Problems? Try Google Earth! | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
Aiming to get kids to understand and solve real-world math problems, one teacher developed a tool that uses Google Earth.

 

Tags: math, google.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 22, 2015 2:42 PM

There is a new programme which helps students truly understand the usage of math skills being taught in school. It is a game that students may play, which actually put the math skills learned in school into play. This solves the time old question of "when will I ever use this?" It is very fun and uses Google maps to manifest questions for each sections from grades 5-10. It is putting more use of the Google maps and helps others learn about geography as it is using the maps.

This shows another way to use Google maps, which uses a GIS system to track locations. The online maps presents many different opportunities of teaching others, through various methods, and geography can be present in any topic shown. Geography can help others learn through spatial recognition in the case of math, and many other ideas.

Woodstock School's curator insight, March 23, 2015 1:39 AM

“Pray tell us, what's your favorite number?"...
"Shiva jumped up to the board, uninvited, and wrote 10,213,223"...
"And pray, why would this number interest us?"
"It is the only number that describes itself when you read it, 'One zero, two ones, three twos, two threes'.”
― Abraham Varghese, Cutting for Stone  

Matthew Connealy's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:26 PM

The use of Google Earth is becoming beneficial to Thomas Petra, a middle school teacher that is trying to make learning more interesting. By using Google Earth, he is able to teach lessons in a more interactive and applicable way. An example of this would be when his students learned about distance through the Alaskan dog sledders and their travels. The students are able to learn much more than the conventional way of learning and are able to gain a better sense of the phenomena around them.

 

Although this was used in a mathematical setting, Google Earth is only just beginning. Geography students would greatly benefit from this usage of the app, and more teachers should learn to harness this style of teaching. Students will be able to gain a better sense of what is going on around them, and know more about the world they live in.

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Redrawing the map of Europe

"Fantasy cartography: An animated redrawing of the map of Europe.
Imagine a world in which countries could move as easily as people. A suggestion for a rearranged Europe."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:01 AM

Unit 1

Summary

This video shows countries being able to move easily in order for each countries benefit. Many countries are moved away from their enemies or other feared countries. Also in this idealistic video countries that are landlocked are able to move to places with easier access to water. It also includes moving countries and territories to be near countries that would work well together.

Insight

This personifies countries as moving as they please, literally. I found this a little funny and pretty interesting to see what countries would do if they could daily move. It really reveals the importance of location and geography for countries in that countries are stuck where they are for the most part ad can't just move away from their enemies of conditions. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 2015 9:46 AM

unit 1

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:53 PM

A very interesting and fun short video. It raises a lot of questions has to how this could be done (if it could) and how one creates borders and regions.

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Five infographics that show just how big Tokyo really is

Five infographics that show just how big Tokyo really is | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
With the size of Tokyo hard to grasp, here are 5 infographics that cover some aspect of population, economy, travel, wealth, and energy consumption.

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Map - The most detailed map of Australian population density ever

Map - The most detailed map of Australian population density ever | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
Interactive map using new ABS data shows an unprecedented level of detail of Australian population

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Maps - If All The Ice Melted

Maps - If All The Ice Melted | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
If All The Ice Melted (full detailed composite) [6376x4840] CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS! thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Urban Change

Visualizing Urban Change | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

"60 years has made a big difference in the urban form of American cities. The most rapid change occurred during the mid-century urban renewal period that cleared large tracts of urban land for new highways, parking, and public facilities or housing projects. Fine-grained networks of streets and buildings on small lots were replaced with superblocks and megastructures. While the period did make way for impressive new projects in many cities, many of the scars are still unhealed.  We put together these sliders to show how cities have changed over half a century. In this post, we look at Midwestern cities such as [pictured above] Cincinnati, Ohio."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:33 AM

It's ironic that I feel more accustomed to exploring Cincinnati, OH on foot than I do Providence, RI.  Although I drive in downtown Providence regularly, I seldom have a reason to walk and explore it.  In my yearly visits to Cincinnati to score the AP Human Geography exams, I'm outside my hometown and away from my typical routine. That helps me feel more like a flâneur, to stroll the streets and explore the urban landscape.  This set of 7 before and after images shows Midwestern cities (Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, Cleveland, and Columbus) lets you digitally analyze the last 70 years of urban morphology.  Click here for a gallery 7 of cities in Texas and Oklahoma


Questions to Ponder: What are the biggest changes you see for the 1950 to today?  How are the land uses difference?  Has the density changed?  Do any of urban models help us understand these cities?


Tags: urban, planning, industry, economichistorical, geospatial, urban models, APHG.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Very useful!

Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:22 AM

In the above picture of Cincinnati, Ohio it is clear how much change American cities have undergone in 60 years. In the process of urban renewal these cities have been affected tremendously with the addition of new roads, businesses, and most likely the turning of land over to private developers. All previous land has been renovated and changed into the typical urbanized American city. S.S.

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Women & Agriculture

"In this Feed the Future video, narrator Matt Damon discusses the importance of increasing food production around the world and notes the importance of equipping women with the right tools, training, and  technology to see as much as a 30 percent increase in food production. To feed our growing population we need to increase food production by 70 percent before 2050. Women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce in many areas of the world."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:03 PM

A colleague mine thought that the ideas in this video were so obvious and non-controversial, he said, "Why does this even need to be stated? Why would we exclude women from agriculture?"  The simple answer is that it wouldn't need to be stated if women around the world did have equal access to resources.  For many of the world's poor, this is where the rubber meets the road. 


Tags: developmentgender, agriculture, food production, labor.

AckerbauHalle's curator insight, December 23, 2014 12:37 AM

Für die zukünftige Ernährung der Welt gibt es einen oft übersehenen Faktor: Gleichberechtigung von Frauen. Frauen sind in vielen Ländern für die Arbeit auf den Feldern verantwortlich. Gleichzeitig haben sie keine Rechte am Land und sind schlecht ausgebildet und - wenn überhaupt - schlecht bezahlt. 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 2015 4:50 PM

Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use 

 

This video is about how women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce and that giving them access to land, water, markets, and technology could increase food production by 30%. This in return would help boost the economy. Places such as Kenya have given women the same resources as men and have seen a 22% increase in crop production. In Brazil, programs targeting women in agriculture have helped cut the population in extreme poverty by half and malnutrition by 73%. This video encourages people around the world to help give women the resources they need in order to increase the food production and economy. 

 

This relates to unit 5 because it deals with agriculture and particularly women's roles in agriculture. This video explains how increased resources can help end world hunger. Women are not given as much opportunity as men and this video expresses need to invest in women's rights. 

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

earth

earth | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
An animated map of global wind and weather. Visit the community at https://www.facebook.com/EarthWindMap

Via dilaycock
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, March 15, 2015 2:59 AM

This is the best site ever to demonstrate wind direction and intensity.

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Graphs - Urbanization across the continents

Graphs - Urbanization across the continents | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

% urban now Nth Am 82% Lat Am 80% Europe 73% Oceania 71% World 54% Asia 48% Africa 40% http://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/Highlights/WUP2014-Highlights.pdf … pic.twitter.com/UdnEZGlkRZ


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Maps - Africa is getting more democratic

Maps - Africa is getting more democratic | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

#Africa is turning democratic. From my project: http://bit.ly/1DkpYjW pic.twitter.com/oWlsQfl5cM


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
London to New York City by car? It could happen if the head of Russian Railways has his way.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 29, 2015 7:07 PM

okay one of the pros is if you are retired and love RV driving then fine there is some sightseeing to do instead of just states you can see countries. Also tolls could help pay for the roads, but who decides when to fix their side of the road when something needs fixing do you have an association fee and meetings to force another country to fix there part of the road. With terrorists acts going on this would be a great thing for road blocks. which oil companies get to set up their gas stations Exxon Mobil like up and down 95. or other big corporations. imagine McDonald and Burger King all along the roads and convenience stores all along. Rest stops all along. Oh wait a minute Americans do not like to even drive to another state because its to far who in their right mind is going to drive 12000 miles, what about road fatalities. Bad weather conditions, snow plows, etc... forget it I,m tired this article Drove me crazy.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 4:51 PM

this would be a fantastic idea. i cannot wait for the day when it is possible for someone to drive from one continent to the other. it would be fantastic if this was possible, and I'm sure it would do wonders for trade, tourism, and travel of all sorts.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 18, 2015 3:27 AM

A fascinating article reminding me of the trans Siberian railroad. While certainly it would have great economic benefits it would come with great costs. the trans Siberian railroad was only possible because of near slave labor conditions. The economic benefits of this may outweigh the risk but since this goes through several countries and could adversely affect the economies of other the project will likely remain dream for now. In addition roads and cars unless automated are becoming inefficient and slow. The best alternative to such a vast project going through multiple climates would be a bullet train that could go at high speeds from one spot to another. Furthermore with such a large area environmental impacts would have to be addressed as well as potential pollution concerns.

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

None of the world's top industries would be profitable if they paid for the natural capital they use

None of the world's top industries would be profitable if they paid for the natural capital they use | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it

A sobering new study finds that the world's biggest industries burn through $7.3 trillion worth of free natural capital a year. And it's the only reason they turn a profit.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time

Roam the World in (Almost) Real Time | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
A groundbreaking Mapbox project ushers in a new era for online cartography.

 

On Google Earth, the seasons rarely change. Most anywhere a digital traveler goes, the sky is cloudless and the grass is green. No snow on the ground in Iowa. No fire in Valparaiso. It's a big gap between the world as it is and as it's mapped.

Launched Thursday,a landmark project from Mapbox has changed the summertime paradigm for online cartography. Landsat-live reveals the planet's surface in real time and in stunning resolution, fed by a constant stream of public-domain imagery from NASA’s Landsat 8 satellite.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
YEC Geo's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:59 AM

This sounds really cool.

 

UPDATE:  I've had a chance to look at this. 

 

Cool things:  great images.

 

Not so cool:  It's not a substitute for Google Earth.   You can only pan out or in to a limited degree, so to go from Texas to Timbuctoo, for example, would take a lot of clicking and dragging.  Best way to get to a place is to type it in the search box.  No 3-D view also. And if there are a lot of clouds when the image was taken, they'll obscure the landscape.

 

That being said, if you want to see large-scale, recent images of a particular place, it's a good site. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 4:34 PM

Summary: This interesting article talks a lot about modern technologies effect on the popularity of geography. This article talks about how programs like Google Earth have caused a general interest to arise about physical geography.

 

Insight: This article is significant to unit 1 because it shows how GIS can be so influential to not only geographers but to the rest of society.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 2015 12:16 PM

unit 1

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute

Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan sign deal to end Nile dispute | Geofactualidades | Scoop.it
Three African leaders sign an initial deal to end a long-running dispute over the sharing of Nile waters and the building of Africa's biggest hydroelectric dam.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 7:22 PM

This article discusses the dispute between Egypt and Ethiopia over the construction of a dam that would provide Ethiopia with a larger share of the Nile's water. Egypt is wholly opposed to this dam because it would mean less water for the country, which so desperately needs it. With 95% of the population of Egypt living within 20km of the Nile River, a reduction in the amount of water supplied to these tens of millions could potentially spell slow disaster. At the same time, however, Ethiopia desperately needs water from the Nile in order to provide sustainable energy for its citizens. 

 

The Nile has been a source of life and energy for thousands of years in an oppressively hot, dry place. The ancient Egyptians counted on the Nile to flood every year so that they would have arable land and used the large river to irrigate their farmland. It is almost ironic, therefore, that Egyptians are once again counting on the water of the Nile to help them survive in such a harsh climate. It seems that the Nile is one of those natural geographic features that is pivotal to political, economic, and social wellbeing. It represents the nexus between natural landforms and the political and economic goals of human beings and nations. Dispute over use of the Nile as a natural and life-giving resource is not the first instance of human debate over possession or use of natural geography and it likely won't be the last. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 31, 11:57 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 12:19 AM

85% of the Nile's water comes from the Blue Nile that originates in the Ethiopian highlands--it is the Blue Nile that Ethiopia has been working on damming since 2011.  The Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam (GERD) will be located near the border with Sudan (see in Google Maps).  Prior to this trilateral agreement, Egypt and Sudan received the majority of the Nile's waters because of outdated colonial-era treaties that ignored upstream riparian states.  This explains why in the past, Egypt was so adamantly opposed to Ethiopia's plan fearing that their water supply with be threatened.  Today though, the Egyptian President said, "We have chosen cooperation, and to trust one another for the sake of development."  


Tags: Ethiopia, Africa, supranationalism, political, development, environment, water, energy, borders.

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Video - Postcards from Pripyat, Chernobyl

Earlier this year I had the opportunity to visit Chernobyl whilst working for CBS News on a '60 Minutes' episode which aired on Nov. 23, 2014. Bob Simon is the correspondent. Michael Gavshon and David Levine, producers.

For the full story cbsnews.com/news/chernobyl-the-catastrophe-that-never-ended/

----> ***Soundtrack 'Promise land' by Hannah Miller - licensed on themusicbed.com
Available on iTunes here itunes.apple.com/us/album/promise-land-single/id948047626

Chernobyl is one of the most interesting and dangerous places I've been. The nuclear disaster, which happened in 1986 (the year after I was born), had an effect on so many people, including my family when we lived in Italy. The nuclear dust clouds swept westward towards us. The Italian police went round and threw away all the local produce and my mother rushed out to purchase as much tinned milk as possible to feed me, her infant son.

It caused so much distress hundreds of miles away, so I can't imagine how terrifying it would have been for the hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian citizens who were forced to evacuate.

During my stay, I met so many amazing people, one of whom was my guide Yevgen, also known as a 'Stalker'. We spent the week together exploring Chernobyl and the nearby abandoned city of Pripyat. There was something serene, yet highly disturbing about this place. Time has stood still and there are memories of past happenings floating around us.

Armed with a camera and a dosimeter geiger counter I explored...

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Video - Lava meets snow in Kamchatka

Video courtesy Nature Communications/Benjamin R. Edwards.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

Rescooped by Pedro Damião from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mapping World Religions


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world.