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Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use Comparing Urban Footprints

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use Comparing Urban Footprints | geo education | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This shows how a huge number of people live in urban areas and much of the population is distributed amongst them.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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Unit 5: Agriculture, Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Unit 5: Agriculture, Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | geo education | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:22 AM

In this modern age the words health and cheap are rarley paired together and especiall not in Agriculture. Farmers have to make the decision wether they want to be profitable and continue their family farm or to try to be organinc and continue their families practices. Its nearly impossible to combine the two. What mr thompson decided to do is common among the farming community and that is to pruduce crops with high profit yeilds such as GM soy but also take the nessacary precautions to not danger the surronding enviroment. Hopefully in the future healthier farming is mor profitable farming so people wont have to straddle this moral line.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

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Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses Does English still borrow words from other languages?

Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses Does English still borrow words from other languages? | geo education | Scoop.it

"English language has 'borrowed' words for centuries. But is it now lending more than it's taking, asks Philip Durkin, deputy chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary. "

 

Knowledge of what is being borrowed, and from where, provides an invaluable insight into the international relations of the English language.  Today English borrows words from other languages with a truly global reach.


Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

English is still a language that is made off of other languages, not many if any of our words were not atleast based off of someother language!

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Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 6:08 PM
Words of the English language were borrowed from other numerous languages. Foreign words will continue to be introduced to the language with the growth of globalization
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:51 AM

Words of the English language were borrowed from other numerous languages. Foreign words will continue to be introduced to the language with the growth of globalization

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 12, 11:44 PM

Summary- This article explains how the English language is using many words from other languages. Leg, sky, take , they are all examples of these words borrowed.  In this example these languages are from the Scandinavian language. While we may not realize it, we use words from languages every single day. English is like a melting pot of mixed languages.

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one thing we study is where languages come from. Languages come from many places and ofter are similar to some, and very different from others. Many languages such as ours, "borrow" words from other languages to be in out own. This shows that the diffusion of many languages mix or overlap a little.

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Guatemala acknowledges death of 88 children from malnutrition

Guatemala acknowledges death of 88 children from malnutrition | geo education | Scoop.it
Guatemala City, Nov 1 (EFE).- The Guatemalan government acknowledged Friday that 88 children under the age of 5 have died in this Central American country so far this year from severe malnutrition, a scourge that affects 49 percent of minors here.

Via Mr. David Burton
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

We should really be thankful for what we have and really recongize what other people dont have.

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Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use Comparing Urban Footprints

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use Comparing Urban Footprints | geo education | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This shows how a huge number of people live in urban areas and much of the population is distributed amongst them.

more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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Unit 2: Population and Migration, For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico...

Unit 2: Population and Migration, For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico... | geo education | Scoop.it
"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration." (Not migration FROM Mexico, let's talk about migration TO Mexico: "For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity...

Via Mr. David Burton
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This is an interesting flowmap w/description because it shows how US is no longer the "land of opportunity", Mexico is...the irony.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:48 AM

This is an interesting flowmap w/description because it shows how US is no longer the "land of opportunity", Mexico is...the irony.

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Unit 5: Agriculture Can Food Independence Save The World?

Unit 5: Agriculture Can Food Independence Save The World? | geo education | Scoop.it

Food independence refers to an individual or communities right to produce and distribute food without government intervention or control. Also inherent to the food independence movement is a desire to remove the power of food productionfrom vast international corporations and place it back in the hands of ordinary people. Food independence can be realised as an individual as a family unit or as a community, the ideal of self-sufficient living and independence from centralised bureaucracies is fast growing in popularity.

 

Health Concerns

Thinkers from around the world believe that achieving food independence is not only necessary to improve the quality of our food but to ensure the protection of human health from industry practices. The numerous health concerns cited by experts who support food independence include the use of genetic modification, the saturation of produce with chemical insecticide and fertilisers, the overly early harvest of produce leading to diminished biochemical value and the constant choice of profit over nutrition. It is a well known fact that the agri-businesses of today are producing substandard food using a production process which is highly damaging not only to human health but to the environment as a whole.

 

Moral Issues

In addition to the health concerns there are numerous social and moral issues surrounding food supply. A pertinent example is the over reliance upon imports from countries where labour standards and environmental protections are virtually non-existent. Even if the international scope of the moral issues inherent to the topic of food supply are not enough to inspire action, the complete dependence which the domestic population has on such a small and powerful group of corporations is a cause for concern. It is well-known that supermarkets can run dry within 24 hours of any major disaster. Not only this but governments around the world have a record of complicity in aiding the proliferation of bad food practices, this is especially evident in the rise of genetically modified organisms despite a plethora of evidence that GMO’s cause cancer and sterility.

 

It takes a great deal of organisation and planning

Becoming food independent is not something that should be approached lightly, it requires a great deal of patience and organisation normally achieved within a highly motivated group dynamic. In the long term however the benefits are huge, if food independence keeps growing in the manner that is presently we will witness profound changes in social dynamics and in our attitudes to consumption. Successful examples can be found from across the globe, in England the town of Todmorden is four years into its quest for self-sufficiency and easily on track for its target date of 2018.

 

It Really Is Happening

The idea has spread like wildfire as a perfect storm of political, health, ecological and economic issues is causing a new Renaissance in food values. Communities want fresh organic produce with minimised social and environmental impact.

There are already thousands of food independent families, communities and townships within the United States and hundreds of towns, in reference to the declaration of Independence, issue declarations of food independence every year. It remains an issue where people of any political persuasion can find common ground. Whether domestic self-determination is your goal or the environmental aspect of global food production worries you, folk of all political creeds will find working together to maintain their own basic needs is a great way to create a better community and a better world.


Via Giri Kumar
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This shows how human dietary choice could impact the environment because the abusal of land for mass producing food is quickly reducing its effectivness, slowly destroying all our useful land and food producing.

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Unit 2: Population, Ethnic/Population Density Map

Unit 2: Population, Ethnic/Population Density Map | geo education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."


Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:52 AM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:27 PM

This article shows the ethnic distribution across the US.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 25, 2014 12:30 PM

The Wired article's claim that this map depicts racial segregation instead of ethnic diversity can be seen in the patterns found in most of the major cities. While cities like Los Angeles and Las Vegas have many mixed areas containing different colored dots, other cities like Dallas and Atlanta show very clear cut lines between the ethnic makeup of areas. When zoomed out, the map certainly looks segregated with areas clearly marked blue, green, or yellow.

 

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Unit 5: Agriculture, Geography of Quinoa

Unit 5: Agriculture, Geography of Quinoa | geo education | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

Its crazy how something grown so far away can become such a dominant aspect in the food consupmtion of people in such distant place.

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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 9, 5:51 PM

This article was short so I clicked on the link that directed me to an Al Jazeera article, which went more in depth in this issue. My scoop reflects information gained from both articles. 

It is nice to see the world taking notice of such a nutritionally rich grain, that being quinoa. The world has many poor regions that in turn produce malnourished people, the production of quinoa on a global scale seems to benefit many. Yet, on a local more personal level there are people suffering from the demand/price boom. 

Local Bolivian residents, mostly surrounding the quinoa production regions (Andes) are suffering from the rising price of Quinoa. I find this to be outrageous. Regions can provide enough quinoa for the world yet overlook the sales of residents, whom have been valuing quinoa for generations upon generations. Now there are many whom cant afford it. 

The mass consumption of quinoa has now created mass production of the crop. This in turn is affecting the Nitrogen level of soil in certain regions, creating rifts amongst landowners (land owned due to native beliefs), and neglect of certain business men in regards to there native lands. The industry is changing the landscape and affecting the culture of rural regions as a whole. 

In response to the increased malnourishment of Bolivian citizens throughout the nation the government has issued a law declaring the children and pregnant woman being issued quinoa on a regular basis. This in turn provides nourishment these people need on a daily schedule. This is good progress however it doesn't pertain to the nation as a whole and also it only benefits the people receiving the quinoa for a period of time (end of pregnancy, older age/no longer a child). If Boliva wants to take part in global distribution of this crop it needs to tend to its own borders and secure a stable environment amongst its population. Its producing a product that battles malnourishment, no need for an immense population of people being malnourished throughout the general area. Very ironic. 

 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

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Unit 4: Political Organization of Space. 9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask

Unit 4: Political Organization of Space. 9 questions about Ukraine you were too embarrassed to ask | geo education | Scoop.it

Watch a video that explains Ukraine's crisis in two minutes or read this quick article that covers the same material.  

 

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In Kiev, the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. On Tuesday, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next.

 


Via Seth Dixon, Mrs. B
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

Pretty interesting video on Ukraine as I did not know any of this before! It gives us an idea of how ignorant we really are because we are kept in the dark so much about what is really going on.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:50 PM

This article does a good job of explaining some of the many aspects of the current crisis in the Ukraine. While the media has been covering this conflict it has done little to provide background information on the Ukraine and precisely why Russia has invaded. This article goes into enough detail to flesh out the conflict without becoming in accessible to the average reader.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:58 PM

Ukrainians have been protesting since Nov. 21, when President Viktor Yanukovych rejected a deal for closer integration with the European Union, instead drawing the country closer to Russia. They are still in the streets in huge numbers and have seized regional government buildings in several parts of the country. In the capital, clashes between protesters and security forces have become violent, killing several people. Recently, the prime minister resigned. No one is quite sure what will happen next. What's happening in Ukraine is really important, but it can also be confusing and difficult to follow for outsiders who don't know the history that led up to. Here are some basic questions that have basic answers for people who are still confused. What is Ukraine? Why are so many people protesting? How did Ukraine get so divided? What role does Russia play and why do they care so much? Why haven't the United States or Europe helped? But most important, the question we all want to know the answer to is what is going to happen next?

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 3:01 PM

Such a helpful article, especially for people like me who don't like to look like an idiot.  This was so informative in a way that condensed the big issue into one short article that covered every aspect and made it easy to understand.  I knew there was something going on in Ukraine but didn't really know what it was, so this was awesome.  However, this is a real issue that people need to be aware of, especially when thinking, "well why doesn't the west just step in?" because that seems to be what we do everywhere else.  However, I think we've pretty much proven that stepping in can sometimes do more harm than good.  And honestly, it is not our problem to solve.

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Unit 2: Population and Migration,Number of Syrian refugees in Turkey exceeds 600,000: Turkish official

Unit 2: Population and Migration,Number of Syrian refugees in Turkey exceeds 600,000: Turkish official | geo education | Scoop.it
ANKARA (Reuters) - The number of Syrian refugees in Turkey has exceeded 600,000 and more than 400,000 of them are living outside refugee camps, the Turkish disaster management agency said on Monday.We...

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Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This mind-boggling number of syrians who are fleeing into turkey is crazy because the civil war that is currently happening in Syria is pushing out such a ridiculuos number of people!

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

This mind-boggling number of syrians who are fleeing into turkey is crazy because the civil war that is currently happening in Syria is pushing out such a ridiculous number of people!

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Unit 2: Population and Immigration, 'Immigration system is like a never-ending game of snakes and ladders': Theresa May vows to kick out illegal migrants BEFORE they get chance to appeal

Unit 2: Population and Immigration, 'Immigration system is like a never-ending game of snakes and ladders': Theresa May vows to kick out illegal migrants BEFORE they get chance to appeal | geo education | Scoop.it

Comes after Cameron indicated the Tories are ready to quit the European Court of Human RightsHome Secretary will also cut the number of grounds of appeal for migrants 
Home Office officials expect the crackdown will halve the 68,000 cases lodged against the Government every yearIn shiny patent brogues May vowed to kick out illegal immigrants

 

Britain's immigration system is like a 'never-ending game of snakes and ladders', Theresa May claimed today as she vowed to end the culture of endless appeals.

The Home Secretary used a speech at the Tory party conference to announce that foreign criminals, terrorists and illegal immigrants will be kicked out of Britain before they get the chance to claim their human rights are being breached.

She also promised to slash the number of grounds on which migrants can lodge an appeal from the current 17 to just four after the fiasco of the deportation of Abu Qatada, who finally returned home to Jordan earlier this year after a 12-year legal battle.

 

Home Office officials expect the crackdown to more than halve the astonishing 68,000 cases lodged against the Government every year.

‘I am clear that the law must be on the side of people who respect the law, not those who break it,’ Mrs May said.

Her move came as David Cameron gave the strongest signal yet that the Tories are ready to quit the meddling European Court of Human Rights. 

 

The Prime Minister said he would do ‘whatever it takes’ to ensure Britain can throw out people who pose a threat to the country and have no right to be here.

The court’s interpretation of the European Convention on Human Rights, which is enshrined in British law in the Human Rights Act, has been condemned by many Conservative MPs.

Asked if the party is considering complete withdrawal, the Prime Minister said: ‘It may be that that is where we end up.’

 

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling told the Conservative Party conference in Manchester today that the court has become a ‘big international frustration’. 

A Tory government would ‘scrap Labour’s Human Rights Act and make sure that with legal rights go legal responsibilities’.

Ministers have tried for years to take a hard line against preachers of hate, foreign criminals and illegal immigrants. 

But they can drag out the appeal process for years – usually by citing the Human Rights Act and the European Convention on Human Rights.

 

The ECHR has been invoked by scores of people fighting deportation from Britain. They argue its provisions mean they are entitled to various rights, including the right to a family life. As soon as an appeal is lodged, deportation proceedings are halted. 

In a Daily Mail interview, Mrs May said public trust was being undermined – and tens of millions of pounds squandered – by migrants and their lawyers playing the system.

 

In future, officials will be told to throw people out of the country as soon as their case has been decided by the Government – a system which is already in place in France. They can still appeal, but only from their homeland. 

The only exception would be in cases where there is a ‘risk of serious irreversible harm’, such as torture or execution.

Migrants who claim to have a right to a ‘family life’ under article 8 of the Human Rights – the biggest frustration to the public – can still be thrown out.

Tory backbenchers will hope the tough stance, which will be unveiled in Mrs May’s speech to the conference today, will help to win back voters who have defected to Ukip.

Mrs May said: ‘The Abu Qatada case proved that we need a dramatic change in our human rights law. We’re going to cut the number of appeal rights, extend cases where we deport first and hear the appeal later, and use primary legislation to make sure judges interpret the “right to a family life” properly.’ 

Mrs May also wants to end the farce of migrants being able to build up ‘rights’ to stay in Britain by stringing out an appeal for as long as possible. The longer a person can remain in the UK - even if they are facing removal - the easier it is to claim they have established a ‘family life’.

A new Immigration Bill will be introduced when Parliament returns. The 17 existing rights of appeal will be cut to just four. A right of appeal will only exist where the decision is complex and fact-specific.

The Tories say it will reduce the number of appeals by nearly 60 per cent, leading to an estimated net saving of £219million over ten years.

 

In her speech to the Tory party conference in Manchester today, Mrs May said: 'The Government will soon publish the Immigration Bill, which will make it easier to get rid of people with no right to be here.

'First, we are going to cut the number of appeal rights. At the moment the system is like a never-ending game of snakes and ladders with almost 70,000 appeals heard every year.

'The winners - foreign criminals and immigration lawyers, while the losers are the victims of these crimes and the public.

'So we're going to cut the number of appeal rights from 17 to four and in doing so cut the total number of appeals by more than half.

'Last year human rights were cited in almost 10,000 immigration appeal cases so the second thing we will do is extend the number of non-suspensive appeals.

'That means that where there is no risk of serious and irreversible harm we should deport foreign criminals first and hear their appeals later.'

Pranav Pradeep's insight:

We get a better idea of how some people with power react to immigration policies/ changes.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:46 AM

We get a better idea of how some people with power react to immigration policies/ changes. 

 
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All Stuff Pics: 25 Astonishing Nature Photographs From National Geographic

All Stuff Pics: 25 Astonishing Nature Photographs From National Geographic | geo education | Scoop.it

Via Tiaan Jonker
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This is a nice photoessay because it helps us appreciate the beauty of nature and links us further with our geographic world

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Unit 6: Industrializations and Economic Development: Jobs, Robots, Capitalism, Inequality, And You | TechCrunch

Unit 6: Industrializations and Economic Development: Jobs, Robots, Capitalism, Inequality, And You | TechCrunch | geo education | Scoop.it

Maybe I’m wrong. Maybe everything will be fine. Maybe the “widening gap between rich and poor” is temporary. Maybe the steady growth in the proportion of jobs that are part-time and/or low-paid will soon reverse.

 

Or maybe the idea that all the homeless need are old laptops and a few JavaScript textbooks is not unlike the claim that new technologies automatically create new jobs for everyone. Maybe, unless something drastic changes, most people are totally screwed.

 

This has not been a great decade for the average American. The recession ended in 2009, but median household income remains 6.1% below what it was in December 2007…while the income of the top 10% rose. Meanwhile, productivity growth has been exceedingly sluggish on both sides of the Atlantic. The Economist explains, and theorizes:

 

"In the early 2000s, in both Britain and America growth and wages peeled apart. The economy kept growing, but median earners did not feel the benefit… in Britain a net 360,000 self-employed jobs have been created in the first four years of recovery… The self-employed work longer but their median hourly earnings are less than half those of employees."

 

Another theory is far more disconcerting: it’s the suggestion that “the economic progress of the past 250 years may have been a unique period in human history.” As New York Magazine puts it:

 

"At some point in the late sixties or early seventies, this great acceleration began to taper off … The rate at which life is improving here, on the frontier of human well-being, has slowed."

 

Which neatly echoes Peter Thiel’s essay “The End of the Future”:

 

"Technological progress has fallen short in many domains… While innovation in medicine and biotechnology has not stalled completely, here too signs of slowed progress and reduced expectations abound… By default, computers have become the single great hope for the technological future. The economic decoupling of computers from everything else leads to more questions than answers, and barely hints at the strange future where today’s trends simply continue."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This shows how jobs are changing over time because of the new inventions and technological innovations our time is facing

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Unit 1: Nature and Perspectives of Geography, Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Unit 1: Nature and Perspectives of Geography, Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | geo education | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

Via Seth Dixon
Pranav Pradeep's insight:

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.