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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | geo | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

Patty B's curator insight, April 29, 12:31 PM
This was, of course, massive news coming out of China. It is something that needed to be done, at least from the Chinese's standpoint. But this is also an important issue to the entire world. First and foremost, this article ties into the fact that the world's population reached 7 billion within the past couple of years and is continuing to rise. It ties into the fact that the human population is quickly approaching its maximum capacity. While China's new policy may or may not speed up the world population by any amount that will truly matter, any news related to global population at this point in time is a hot topic. But this policy was implemented to reverse some serious issues that have arisen in China as a result of its one-child policy. It's population is made up with a majority of retirement aged folk. China needs to ensure it has enough qualified working-aged people in the future and believe a two-child limit will aid in this happening. So of course China had many economic reasons for ending its one-child policy, but there are also certain social reasons for doing so I think. In a world where many human rights and civil rights issues have found their ways to the forefront of political and social discussions, China must have felt obligated to do something about the one-child policy to keep up with the wave of political correctness sweeping the globe. A one-child policy seemed extremely restrictive in a world that is becoming increasingly more apt to let people make decisions for themselves. 
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America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it | geo | Scoop.it
Why is the US the only industrialized nation with a rising rate of maternal mortality? Supermodel-turned-maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns talks about her latest mission to raise awareness about maternal deaths.

 

99% of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth occur in the developing world. The good news is that in most countries the rate of maternal mortality has been going down. The bad news is that in eight countries the rate is going up. The shocking news is that the United States is among them. It is the only industrialized country to have that dubious distinction. The rate has in fact been doubling in recent years.

 

Tag: mortality, development, gender, statistics, USA.


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Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:34 AM
Excellent article for population geography challenges for the future
Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:17 PM

Good question, Why is the US rate of maternal mortality so high. We pay three times higher the average cost for medical care, then any other industrialized nation of earth? Fred Issa,

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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | geo | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.

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Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:01 PM

Summary: This interactive map from the New York Times shows where people in each state are born, highlighting the growing internal migration in the United States alone. For example, only a small percentage of people living in Florida were actually born there, while the majority of Louisiana residents were born there.

 

Insight: I think this is an interesting map mostly because of it's interactive feature, in that you can see how internal migration has drastically changed since 1900. It relates to unit 2 in that migration patterns are always changing, whether they be internal or external. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:55 PM

Migration

Peyton Conner's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:18 AM

I believe this is a very interesting article that shows just how diverse migration is in the United State today. I especially liked the idea of seeing how migration has changed from 1900 to 2012. This map could easily be used to infer why people migrate in the United States.PC

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U.S. Territories

A set of Supreme Court decisions made over 100 years ago has left U.S. territories without meaningful representation. That’s weird, right?

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Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:06 AM

I think it is interesting one point that he brought up was the ability for someone who is born in a US territory may vote for president, however; if that candidate would like to win votes from his home territory he cannot. This is because the territory is unable to vote for presidents. Puerto Rico is also spoken of in which it highlights their ability to become a state and the difference they have in language.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 10:57 PM

This was amazing! I love him! I  am embarrassed to admit that i had no idea about any of this. I did not know that those territories were part of my country. This populations complete commitment to serving our country without any of the benefits is jaw dropping. We should be completely ashamed of our selves. I am honestly completely surprised that even in today's day in age this hasn't been fixed. Everything about this is unconstitutional. How this case loses in a court is beyond me. One of the things that stood out to me the most was the fact that 67% of Guam shows up to vote in though their votes dont count and yet only 61% of all of the US does...that embarrassing. We have clearly taken for granted our freedom to vote.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:50 AM

The plight of our territories is a smudge on our nations character. The most controversial of these issues is Puerto Ricos status as a territory of the United States. Puerto Ricans are United States citizens by law, yet they have no representation in their government. They can not vote in presidential elections, have no real representation in the congress except their non voting delegate, and they have no representation in the electoral college.  Something must be done, to rectify this situation. A possible solution may be to pass a 23rd amendment for Puerto Rico. The 23rd Amendment provides residents of the nations capital the right to vote, and representation in the electoral college. DC is given a number of electoral votes equivalent to the least populous state. That number is 3 electoral votes. The amendment does not provide DC  with representation in the Congress. This Amendment has been controversial since the time of its ratification in 1961. Congress later repealed the amendment with a new DC voting rights amendment  that gave DC representation in Congress. The new Amendment failed to garner enough support amongst the states for ratification. To me the 23rd Amendment solution is the best possible compromise. It gives Puerto Rico representation, while persevering the rights and sanctity of the states.

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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | geo | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.

 

At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:41 PM

Maps, Urbanization

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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | geo | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 2015 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 12:11 PM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tags:  economic, labor, globalization, unit 6 industry.

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | geo | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.


Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.

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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | geo | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 8, 2014 9:28 PM

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 2014 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U4

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A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | geo | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 23, 2014 11:04 PM

This article gives some background on the political purposes behind urban planning and public squares that carry cultural meaning.  While Ukraine is the reason for delving into the topic, the article explores the politicization of public squares in various regional and historical contexts.  The image above shows how monuments, despite their 'official' meaning, can be rearticulated and reinterpreted as other audiences inscribe meaning into the landscape.  

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:21 PM

Very interesting article about public spaces transformed by public protest.

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | geo | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:20 PM

Globalization is a polarizing topic, and that is embodied very well in this article concerning the economic ascendancy of the Vietnamese economy. Globalization is responsible for the colonization of the nation, and the subsequent century of bloodshed between opposing nationalist and international forces. Global trade, however, and the introduction of coffee in Vietnam by the French, is responsible for Vietnam's current economic boost. 30 years ago, 60% of Vietnamese lived below the national poverty line; today, that number has fallen to below 10%, an extraordinary achievement. How? Vietnam has emerged as a major player in the global coffee trade, its market share rising from 0.1% to 20% in the same time period, ensuring mass employment for the first time since colonization. Is the system perfect? No- we have learned that diversified economies are integral to development, and nations too dependent on a single sector of the economy can face ruin when confronted with fluctuating market prices, supply, and global demand. There could be improvements to the existing trade, and the government could be doing even more for those who fall below the poverty line- the average Vietnamese worker still only makes a paltry $1300 annual salary- but this is a major step in the right direction. Hopefully this trend can continue, and Vietnam can continue its rise and become a fully developed nation, much like its predecessors in Asia, South Korea, China, and Japan.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:59 PM

Well for one thing this gives a chance for growth at the expense of others. I noticed though that the numbers stated that since the end of the war in 1975 the poverty level has decreased from 60% to 10%. But what about the possibility of corruption? environmentally there appears to be  deforestation, lots of water usage therefore future water shortage.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:29 PM
Typically I would always associate coffee and coffee beans coming from Spanish speaking countries and I would associate Asian countries with drinking tea. This threw me for a little twist, The Vietnamese do drink coffee though. Coffee was introduced to Vietnam in the 19th century by the French. A majority of their coffee beans are exported since the country needs money. After the Vietnam war had ended, their communist ally, The Soviet Union did nothing to help the crippled country. Agriculture was a disaster, bu the government decided to take a risk in the 80s with growing coffee. It was a success and kept increasing 20%-30% every year in the 90s. Now it employs over two million people. Even major brands like Nestle has coffee bean growing rights there.
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | geo | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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Thousands of Rats Rule This Indian Temple

Thousands of Rats Rule This Indian Temple | geo | Scoop.it
Atlas Obscura on Slate is a blog about the world's hidden wonders. Like us on Facebook, Tumblr, or follow us on Twitter @atlasobscura. At Karni Mata temple in Rajasthan, rats aren't shooed away — they're worshipped.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | geo | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

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The Global Refugee Crisis, Region by Region

The Global Refugee Crisis, Region by Region | geo | Scoop.it
In the latest crisis, tens of thousands are racing to Hungary before a border fence is finished.

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Ricard Garcia's curator insight, September 3, 2015 2:13 AM

A good article that can be used to talk about social issues in English

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:34 AM

refugee

asli telli's curator insight, September 17, 2015 1:25 AM

#refugees #syria #middleeast #regions

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27 Facts About Maps

A weekly show where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John shares 27 facts about maps.

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Ashley Burleson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 4:45 AM

This Mental Floss video is an entertaining rapid-fire hodgepodge of map trivia with some important educational content nicely nestled in there.  This 99 Percent Invisible podcast is another 'ode to maps,' but this one is more poetic about the value of cartography and personal in how it explores the qualities they possess.  Enjoy them both!  

Tags:  mapping, trivia, cartography.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:43 AM

Maps are awesome - need I say more! This clip actually covers a significant amount on the power / influence of maps through history.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, August 11, 2015 7:59 PM

Very USA centric but entertaining and makes you think about the taken-for- granted use of maps. We do believe them!!

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Digging In: Land Reclamation and Defenses in the South China Sea

Digging In: Land Reclamation and Defenses in the South China Sea | geo | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Defense’s latest assessment of the Chinese military provided new detail on China’s land reclamation efforts on several of the islets that it occupies in the South China Sea. These include Fiery Cross Reef, Gaven Reef, Johnson South Reef, Mischief Reef, and Subi Reef in the Spratly archipelago. By December 2014, the report estimated that China had reclaimed as much as 500 acres of new land, creating full-fledged islands where only coral reefs or sand spits existed before. Since then, China has only accelerated its efforts, expanding the total land area that it has reclaimed to 2,000 acres and building military facilities, ports, and at least one airstrip on the islands.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 11, 2015 4:18 PM

We've heard in the news recently that China is reclaiming land from the South China see to presumably construct an air strip to strengthen their claims in the region.  China is not alone in this...


Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

Marc Meynardi's curator insight, May 13, 2015 1:49 AM

By doing so, China is not only digging land, but also preparing futur heavy discord. It's so strange : China critisize US hegemony and try to balance it. As result, China is having the same agressive attitude that US Bush era. Of course, not using bombs, but "pacifically" invading south China Sea.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:15 PM

I was wondering with the world being 80% ocean how much ocean can be transformed into land with these man made islands. Once again creating military strategic posts.

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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 2015 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | geo | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2015 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

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Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World

Take A Mouth-Watering Tour Of School Lunches From Around The World | geo | Scoop.it
Eating at the school cafeteria could've been amazing if you grew up almost anywhere but the U.S.

 

Tags: agriculture, food distribution. 


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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 25, 2015 5:53 PM

This is a really cool article! I always enjoy looking at food from around the world, so I automatically scooped this when I saw it. This is a article with a slideshow of school lunches around the world. At the very end of the photo slide, there is a photo of an American school lunch which is pretty embarrassing compared to Brazil and Finland. This photo series was taken by SweetGreens, and the school lunches were put together to represent an average school lunch, not necessarily what they have every day. 

They talk about how each country eats what is grown around them, while US is processed food like chicken nuggets and chocolate chip cookie.

I really want to move to Brazil and eat their school lunch, haha! It looks so good. For dessert in Finland, they have a berry crepe on their plate! That's awesome! If you have some free time, then be sure to check this out! 

5) Interdependence among regions of food production and consumption

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 6:46 PM

Summary: This article showed a series of pictures, which showed traditional school lunches of different countries. Greece's lunch included a Mediterranean diet, while Brazil's had rice and beans with greens, and the United States had its classic chicken nuggets, chocolate chip cookie, and mashed potatoes. The goal of this article was definitely to show what foods were incorporated into different cultures and climates.

 

Insight: Food is one example of a cultural trait, and quite a prominent one. Tradition may prohibit or encourage eating a certain kind of food, while long term climate also makes a large difference on the crops traditional grown in a country. 

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 10, 9:16 AM

This is an excellent way to compare the impact that agriculture and culture in general have on our schools! 

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This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World

This Chart Explains Every Culture In The World | geo | Scoop.it
As countries become more developed, they travel diagonally to the upper-right.

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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:49 PM

APHG-U3

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 2014 11:12 PM

This is possibly the worst chart in the world!

(a) you can't cluster cultures like this, you lose what matters: Geertz's thick (vs thin) description;

(b) the idea that Protestant Europe or English Speaking cultures value "self expression" vs "survival values" has never been inside a corporate workspace where many people spend many of their lives, or surveyed the incomes of artists in these countries.


(c) Secularity and rationality are also traditions, going back hundreds or even thousands of years.

(d) The idea that as cultures develop, the move towards Protestant Europe is the silliest, most blatantly ethnocentric statement I've seen in a long time.

Let's hope that people are not being trained using this BS.  

Jane Haggis's curator insight, August 18, 2014 2:43 AM

silly

 

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | geo | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 2014 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

Rescooped by sean smith from Geography Education
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Gravity...

Gravity... | geo | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/


Via Seth Dixon
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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 31, 2014 1:42 PM

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:04 PM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

Rescooped by sean smith from Geography Education
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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | geo | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

Rescooped by sean smith from The Geo Feed
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Walled World

Walled World | geo | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, geo-pickmeup.com
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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

Rescooped by sean smith from FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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North Carolina ‘Mystery House’ contains useful secret

North Carolina ‘Mystery House’ contains useful secret | geo | Scoop.it
What appears to be just another house along a busy street that thousands drive by daily hides a valuable secret for the city.

Via FCHSAPGEO
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