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Who Governs The Internet and whose property is it?

Who Governs The Internet and whose property is it? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Who Governs The Internet and whose property is it? Exposing Top Secret Internet Snooping program
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Wagn Wei on mass surveillance programs and the failure to uphold democratic standards and rights to the internet.

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Cheap cab ride? You must have missed Uber’s true cost | Evgeny Morozov

Cheap cab ride? You must have missed Uber’s true cost | Evgeny Morozov | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
When tech giants such as Google and Uber hide their wealth from taxation, they make it harder for us to use technology to improve services
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LEGO’s WeDo 2.0 teaches science, coding | iPads...

At the International Consumer Electronics Show, LEGO Education launched LEGO Education WeDo 2.0, a hands-on science solution designed for elementary classrooms using a robot-based learning system.

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Facebook study suggests online users reinforce their views by creating echo chambers

Facebook study suggests online users reinforce their views by creating echo chambers | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from several institutions in Italy and one in the U.S. has found evidence that suggests Internet users follow a pattern similar to that found in other media regarding how they look for and ...
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In examining their results the researchers report that they found evidence that Facebook users do indeed tend to engage in creating echo chambers, encasing themselves in environments that mesh with their own personal beliefs while rejecting other viewpoints, thereby reinforcing their own views. The researchers suggest such practices help explain such odd phenomenon as the widespread rejection of scientific evidence of global warming, or Jade Helm 15, where alarmists set off online panic by suggesting that military training exercises occurring in various parts of the U.S. last summer were a sure sign of an impending civil war. The researchers suggest that those seeking to break into echo chambers with what they believe is truthful information, find a way to reach a larger audience, rather than by knocking their way into small subgroups. They note that some have achieved some success by resorting to buying advertising space to get their message through.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-01-facebook-online-users-views-echo.html#jCp

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Why we’re going back to the Moon—with or without NASA

Why we’re going back to the Moon—with or without NASA | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Since the Centaur impact, a number of US companies started drawing business plans to unlock the Moon’s water ice for everything from powering spacecraft with liquid hydrogen and oxygen to accessing a wealth of rare metals or building a space-based solar power network.

America’s largest rocket company, United Launch Alliance, has noticed. With an eye on its future, the company is doing critical research on storing and transferring hydrogen and oxygen propellants in space. Many European countries, as well as China and Russia, have also made clear their interest. And just last month, the US Congress signaled its approval, too, by legalizing the mining of lunar resources. More than five years after abandoning it, the space industry appears headed for the Moon
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Since the Centaur impact, a number of US companies started drawing business plans to unlock the Moon’s water ice for everything from powering spacecraft with liquid hydrogen and oxygen to accessing a wealth of rare metals or building a space-based solar power network.

America’s largest rocket company, United Launch Alliance, has noticed. With an eye on its future, the company is doing critical research on storing and transferring hydrogen and oxygen propellants in space. Many European countries, as well as China and Russia, have also made clear their interest. And just last month, the US Congress signaled its approval, too, by legalizing the mining of lunar resources. More than five years after abandoning it, the space industry appears headed for the Moon 

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Should We Keep a Low Profile in Space?

Should We Keep a Low Profile in Space? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
There are fears that sending messages into space could provoke alien aggression.
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Broadcasting is likened to “shouting in the jungle” — not a good idea when you don’t know what’s out there. The British physicist Stephen Hawking alluded to this danger by noting that on Earth, when less advanced societies drew the attention of those more advanced, the consequences for the former were seldom agreeable.

It’s a worry we never used to have. Victorian-era scientists toyed with plans to use lanterns and burning pools of oil to contact postulated Martians. In the 1970s, NASA bolted greeting cards onto spacecraft that will leave our solar system and wander the vast reaches between the stars. The Pioneer and Voyager probes carry plaques and records with information about what humans look like and where Earth is, as well as a small sampling of our culture.

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“Human-Robot Intelligent Cooperation: (…) ” Dr. Luis Paulo Reis (ICINCO 2013)

Keynote Title: Human-Robot Intelligent Cooperation: Methodologies for Creating Human-Robot Heterogeneous Teams Keynote Lecturer: Dr. Luis Paulo Reis ...
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It’s time to give up on the ideal of perfect privacy online — Evan Selinger & Woodrow Hartzog — Aeon Opinions

Many people view the internet as an unstoppable force with regenerative powers. They believe our insatiable appetite for information ensures that even if data gets removed from a particular website, it’s just a matter of time before the vanquished...
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How Apple Is Giving Design A Bad Name

How Apple Is Giving Design A Bad Name | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
For years, Apple followed user-centered design principles. Then something went wrong.
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Anonymous hackers could be Islamic State's online nemesis

Anonymous hackers could be Islamic State's online nemesis | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Anonymous strives to bring down IS propaganda before it reaches the masses.
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Anonymous has been prosecuted for cyber attacks in many countries under cybercrime laws, as their activities are not seen as legitimate protest. It is worth mentioning the ethical debate around hacktivism, as some see cyber attacks that take down accounts or websites as infringing on others’ freedom of expression, while others argue that hacktivismshould instead create technologies to circumvent censorship, enable digital equality and open access to information.

In striving to tackle networks such as IS, Anonymous takes the position that it is fighting against those who coordinate or commit crimes against humanity (“We will unite humanity” the Anonymous video following the Paris attacks promises viewers). Its ideology therefore seeks to be inclusive and reflect a common humanity, which embraces open, fluid identities that are not restricted to nationality, religion or ethnicity.

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Why Did the ‘Twitter Revolutions’ Fail?

Why Did the ‘Twitter Revolutions’ Fail? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Social media can upend a society, but it can’t build a new one.
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Finally, we were seduced by the “Silicon Valley effect,” the fact that our ideas and strategies for social change were shaped less by historical experience and more by the utopian possibilities of the world of technology. Trapped in that belief, we failed to recognize the frailties of the new protest movements and misjudged their impact on society. You can tweet a revolution, but you cannot tweet a government, and many of the new protest movements are paying a high price for their anti-institutional ethos.

These protests fell victim to similar fashionable notions: that organizations are a thing of the past (and networks representative of the future), that states no longer matter, and that spontaneity is the real source for legitimacy.

Disruption, we know well, is highly valued in the technology community and plays a critical role in upending companies. But societies are not made of innovators alone, and very often the demand for constant change and the hosannas for creative destruction eventually bring demand for stability. Mr. Putin, Mr. Erdogan and their ilk understood this point even if the protesters and pontificators didn’t, and they sat patiently until the right moment to reassert their power.

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Why Virtual Classes Can Be Better Than Real Ones - Nautilus

Why Virtual Classes Can Be Better Than Real Ones - Nautilus | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
I teach one of the world’s most popular MOOCs (massive online open courses), “Learning How to Learn,” with neuroscientist Terrence…
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I would venture to say most MOOC deniers have little experience with creating and teaching online courses. The reality is MOOCs can be artistically and technically fascinating and can have terrific pedagogical advantages. This is particularly true in the fraught area of STEM (Science, Technology, Education, Math), where difficult explanations often cry out for a student to replay a portion of a lecture, or simply to take a pause while comprehension works its way to consciousness. As for those dropout rates, Keith Devlin, a mathematician at Stanford University, has pointed out that some widely cited papers on MOOC attrition have depended on traditional metrics of higher education that are “entirely misleading.” People sign up for MOOCs for different reasons than they do for traditional college classes. “A great many never intend to complete the course,” Devlin writes. They “come looking for an education. Pure and simple.”

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The social construction of the Twitter #hashtag

The social construction of the Twitter #hashtag | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

How Twitter’s Hashtag Came to Be

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So it’s hard to believe that at one time, hashtags weren’t a part of the Twitter lexicon. Not only that, but Twitter initially rejected the idea of hashtags.

The invention of the hashtag is credited to Chris Messina. The 32-year-old has worked as a developer and UX designer at Google but left in August to join the San Francisco based startup NeonMob. In his Twitter bio, Messina refers to himself as the hashtag godfather.

On Aug. 23, 2007, Messina sent out the following tweet: “how do you feel about using # (pound) for groups. As in #barcamp [msg]?” And with that, the hashtag was born.

The hashtag was based on the idea of channels used in Internet Relay Chat and in Jaiku, a Twitter competitor that was later bought by Google. But the real inspiration, according to a blog post Messina wrote in 2007, was that he wanted to have a “better eavesdropping experience on Twitter.”

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Don’t Fear the Robots - on ubiquitous algorithms and weak robots

Don’t Fear the Robots -  on ubiquitous algorithms and weak robots | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Attention is better directed toward the promise and peril of artificial intelligence software.
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10 technology stock photos and what they really mean

10 technology stock photos and what they really mean | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

The choice is limited. Need a picture to illustrate a hacker? A photograph of a man, in a darkened room, wearing a hoodie, obviously

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Edge.org 2016: what are the most interesting and important scientific news of the year?

Edge.org 2016: what are the most interesting and important scientific news of the year? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
2016 : WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE MOST INTERESTING RECENT [SCIENTIFIC] NEWS? WHAT MAKES IT IMPORTANT?
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198 responses

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Reddit publishes real-life dead-tree book of its “best” AMAs

Reddit publishes real-life dead-tree book of its “best” AMAs | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Includes the likes of Sir Attenborough, Denzel Washington, and "Double Dick Dude."
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EU Presses Tech Companies over Surveillance, Security - WSJ

EU Presses Tech Companies over Surveillance, Security - WSJ | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

European Union officials are pressing big U.S. tech companies to free up surveillance access to their user data in the wake of last month’s attacks in Paris, marking a continued shift in the debate over privacy and security within the bloc.

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In the first half of this year, for instance, the number of requests for data from Apple by EU governments grew by 48% from a year earlier to more than 16,000, the company says. The number of such requests to Facebook grew nearly a fifth to 13,000.

Also under debate in Thursday’s meetings between the EU and tech firms is the role the companies play in limiting propaganda online. For more than a year EU officials have pushed companies to do more to remove messages from Islamic State, aiming to recruit new terrorists or people to join its fight in Syria and Iraq.

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There’s a lot riding on today’s mission to resupply the International Space Station

There’s a lot riding on today’s mission to resupply the International Space Station | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Last time they tried this, it exploded.
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Why we need a 'space race' approach to saving the planet

Why we need a 'space race' approach to saving the planet | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
NASA once had 400,000 people working on space exploration. We should battle climate change in the same way.
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Benjamin and technology - Nothing Remains Unchanged but the Clouds

Benjamin and technology - Nothing Remains Unchanged but the Clouds | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
 With his worries about the gigantic power of technology and the minuscule moral illumination it can afford, Walter Benjamin remains our contemporary.
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It seems possible that Benjamin would have been at ease in a world of Twitter mobs and TV recaps. A good philosopher, he thought, can make use of this kind of synopsizing and criticism as a springboard to leap toward the truth. Benjamin may also have thrived with a smartphone in his hand. Sociologists like Sherry Turkle often bemoan the hives of isolated people who keep in touch through Facebook and text messages instead of looking each other in the eye; but Benjamin, when he was feeling cheerful enough, loved communicating with large, like-minded audiences about as much as he enjoyed being alone.

Benjamin lived on the rim of what Columbia University law professor Tim Wu calls “the Cycle.” Every new information technology, whether it uses radio waves, telegraph wires, or Ethernet cables, passes “through a phase of revolutionary novelty and youthful utopianism” and ends up “a highly centralized and integrated new industry.” Benjamin scrambled to figure out how to bend new technologies and their effects to his intellectual purposes in a culture where they had become indispensable. Near the beginning of his life, and at many points along the way to his untimely death, he worried, as some of us do, about whether the trade-offs inherent in the Cycle wiped out too much and preserved too little. At times like these, he usually fell to ruminating, not on history as a parade of events, but on something less fixed: constellations of the present and the past.

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Beware of ads that use inaudible sound to link your phone, TV, tablet, and PC

Beware of ads that use inaudible sound to link your phone, TV, tablet, and PC | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Privacy advocates warn feds about surreptitious cross-device tracking.
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How climate change is changing the oceans

Climate change and the Earth's oceans

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Resources on how climate change affects the oceans
«Climate change has caused ocean temperatures to rise, a trend that will continue in the coming centuries even if fossil fuel emissions are curtailed. The uptake of carbon dioxide also makes the oceans more acidic, affecting the ability of organisms to create and maintain calcium-based shells and skeletons. Warm-water corals are particularly susceptible to these effects and may not survive the century unless carbon emissions are greatly reduced. Climate change impacts in the deep ocean are less visible, but the longevity and slow pace of life in the deep makes that ecosystem uniquely sensitive to environmental variability. Marine vertebrates at every depth are being affected, as are humans. Even if international negotiations like those kicking off soon in Paris succeed, we will be coping with the impacts of ocean climate change for centuries.»

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The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, The hidden life of domestic things

The Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership (TTIP) has stirred more passionate controversy than any other trade negotiations.
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How Bioprinting Has Turned Frankenstein's Mad Science Sane - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus

How Bioprinting Has Turned Frankenstein's Mad Science Sane - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
In the United States alone more than 120,000 people are waiting for organ transplants, and many will die before their turns come.…
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« Today’s bioprinters can already produce chunks of functional human tissue, which is a pretty remarkable feat of biological manufacturing. But don’t expect an assembly line for full-sized organs any time soon. Scientists’ major challenge is scaling up: They must create tissue with enough structural integrity to hold an entire organ together, and find ways to knit that synthetic organ into the body’s network of blood vessels. «
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Stop saying technology is causing social isolation — Digital Culturist

Stop saying technology is causing social isolation - Digital Culturist - Medium
A group of friends checking their smartphones while hanging out. Almost everyone on the subway with their eyes fixed on …
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« I see smartphones as instruments for communication. Instruments that enable interaction on ways that just weren’t possible before, connecting us with people all around the world, via Twitter, instant messaging or other services. Some may say that if you want to interact with people, you should interact with the ones around you, and that is probably true on certain occasions. But, on other occasions, I’m just not able to comprehend why should we be forced to interact with those physically close to us instead of with the people that we really want to interact with. «
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