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Gentlemachines
What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
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Trials and tribulations of changing oversight of core internet infrastructure

Trials and tribulations of changing oversight of core internet infrastructure | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
The whole family of internet self-governing bodies are busy preparing their takes on how to reign the future Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). As a coordinator of core infrastructure services for naming (ICANN), numbering (Regional Internet Registries) and standardisation (IETF), IANA has been in the middle of quite some fights. This one might well be the biggest one.
Artur Alves's insight:

«The internet naming, numbering and standardisation communities are falling over their feet to meet the deadline - next September - for fixing the future oversight of Internet Assigned Number Authority (IANA). While some fear it might be the only opportunity to end the privileged oversight role of the United States government, others warn against a rushed solution leaving aspects of the core internet infrastructure at the mercy of a private California-based company, namely the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). IANA is currently a department of ICANN. The question is: can the net community really govern some of its core infrastructure and how much does it need governments for that, if at all?

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ITU Approves Deep Packet Inspection Standard Behind Closed Doors, Ignores Huge Privacy Implications | Techdirt

ITU Approves Deep Packet Inspection Standard Behind Closed Doors, Ignores Huge Privacy Implications | Techdirt | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

"The ITU-T DPI standard holds very little in reserve when it comes to privacy invasion. For example, the document optionally requires DPI systems to support inspection of encrypted traffic “in case of a local availability of the used encryption key(s).” It’s not entirely clear under what circumstances ISPs might have access to such keys, but in any event the very notion of decrypting the users’ traffic (quite possibly against their will) is antithetical to most norms, policies, and laws concerning privacy of communications. In discussing IPSec, an end-to-end encryption technology that obscures all traffic content, the document notes that “aspects related to application identification are for further study” – as if some future work may be dedicated to somehow breaking or circumventing IPSec." (https://www.cdt.org/blogs/cdt/2811adoption-traffic-sniffing-standard-fans-wcit-flames)

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