Gentlemachines
Follow
Find tag "privacy"
2.5K views | +0 today
Gentlemachines
What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Condemnation mounts against ISP that sabotaged users’ e-mail encryption

Condemnation mounts against ISP that sabotaged users’ e-mail encryption | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Researchers say AT&T subsidiary thwarted STARTTLS protection, sent e-mail in clear.
Artur Alves's insight:

«

Digital rights advocates are doubling down on their criticism of a US-based ISP suspected of performing encryption downgrade attacks that caused customers' e-mail to remain in plaintext as it passed over the Internet.

«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Inside DuckDuckGo, Google's Tiniest, Fiercest Competitor

Inside DuckDuckGo, Google's Tiniest, Fiercest Competitor | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
In 2008, launching a search engine seemed like a crazy idea. Here's how Gabriel Weinberg proved the critics wrong.
Artur Alves's insight:

Is  DDG the future of web search? More privacy, more user awareness and more openness. John Paul Titlow gives us an inside look at the most interesting web search engine of the moment.

 

«When Gabriel Weinberg launched a search engine in 2008, plenty of people thought he was insane. How could DuckDuckGo, a tiny, Philadelphia-based startup, go up against Google? One way, he wagered, was by respecting user privacy. Six years later, we're living in the post-Snowden era, and the idea doesn't seem so crazy.

In fact, DuckDuckGo is exploding.

Looking at a chart of DuckDuckGo's daily search queries, the milestones are obvious. A $3 million investment from Union Square Ventures in 2011. Just prior to that, a San Francisco billboard campaign. Inclusion in Time's 50 Best Websites of 2011. Each of these things moved the traffic needle for DuckDuckGo, but none of them came close to sparking anything like the massive spike in queries the company saw last July. That's when Edward Snowden first revealed the NSA's extensive digital surveillance program to the world. The little blue line on the chart hasn't stopped climbing north since.«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Why privacy matters

Why privacy matters | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
The line between public and private has blurred in the past decade, both online and in real life, and Alessandro Acquisti is here to explain what this means and why it matters. In this thought-provoking, slightly chilling talk, he shares details of recent and ongoing research -- including a project that shows how easy it is to match a photograph of a stranger with their sensitive personal information.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Want to Predict the Future of Surveillance? Ask Poor Communities.

Want to Predict the Future of Surveillance? Ask Poor Communities. | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Marginalized groups are often governments' test subjects. Here are a few lessons we can learn from their experiences.
Artur Alves's insight:

"Poor and working-class Americans already live in the surveillance future. The revelations that are so scandalous to the middle-class data profiling, PRISM, tapped cellphones–are old news to millions of low-income Americans, immigrants, and communities of color. To be smart about surveillance in the New Year, we must learn from the experiences of marginalized people in the U.S. and in developing countries the world over. Here are four lessons we might learn if we do.

#1: Surveillance is a civil rights issue.

#2: To a hammer, everything looks like a nail [Solutions are built and tested in convenient, distant contexts long before being made public] 

#3: Everyone resists surveillance, not just the bad guys.

#4: Privacy is not the problem."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Battle over Google Glass etiquette erupts in another Seattle diner

Battle over Google Glass etiquette erupts in another Seattle diner | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Google Glass has been available to early adopters for nearly nine months, and some merchants are doing their best to keep it out of their establishments. Nick Starr, a network engineer in Seattle,...
Artur Alves's insight:

A camera mounted on your head. A camera in your phone. How is that any different, you ask? Well, imagine walking around with your phone always pointing at people, perhaps shooting and recording everything. What would the reactions be?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

ORG Zine | Privacy and anonymity: necessary requirements for free speech?

ORG Zine | Privacy and anonymity: necessary requirements for free speech? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

"In the face of mass surveillance, technology that increases the protection of privacy is under a significant threat from those with an interest in restricting its use; we must fight to ensure that this does not happen. Instead of pitting privacy and freedom of expression against each other, as has been the case for so long, we must embrace the principles contained within both of these fundamental rights to enable the protection of all of us, lest we lose them completely."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

The feudal information age

"When it comes to our data on the internet, we’re serfs again, working land we’ll never own the rights to. I don’t think there’s anything inherently corrupt about electronic communication—no need to abandon the internet, folks—but I do think we’re at a point of transition here. What is the equivalent of a middle class in this situation? It may still be just out of the reach of our imaginations, but a solid place to start is learning what we can about the dependencies already in place."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Whose DNA is it anyway? | Bioethics.net

The 1000 Genomes Project has collected anonymous DNA samples from people all over the world. By looking at this massive data set, the project hopes to discover genetic components of diseases or traits. Their data and the sequences are publicly available on the Internet.

Artur Alves's insight:

"This comes at an interesting time. Federal agencies are reconsidering the rules and regulations regarding privacy and confidentiality and research in tissue samples. Again, there was a belief that a person could not be identified (yet) from a simple tissue sample or leftover tissue from a clinical test. But now, such an assumption is called into doubt. With cheaper DNA sequencing, and only needing to sequence small parts of the genome, re-identification of samples is not only more likely, it is possible.

Perhaps the notion of privacy and confidentiality is quaint and outdated. After all, people willingly share the intimate details of their lives through social media platforms. And with the prevalence of cameras everywhere recording us and GPS on our cell phones knowing our every step, the idea of a private life may be a thing of the past. Younger generations have little expectation of any sort of privacy.

In the meantime, the NIH has removed people’s ages from their databases in the in the hopes of preventing more re-identifying. The long-term solutions, however, remain to be developed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

How to Protect Your Privacy from Facebook's Graph Search

How to Protect Your Privacy from Facebook's Graph Search | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

The deeper the search, the more you need to tweak your privacy settings if you want to limit the scope of your audience. Or cyber stalkers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

ITU Approves Deep Packet Inspection Standard Behind Closed Doors, Ignores Huge Privacy Implications | Techdirt

ITU Approves Deep Packet Inspection Standard Behind Closed Doors, Ignores Huge Privacy Implications | Techdirt | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

"The ITU-T DPI standard holds very little in reserve when it comes to privacy invasion. For example, the document optionally requires DPI systems to support inspection of encrypted traffic “in case of a local availability of the used encryption key(s).” It’s not entirely clear under what circumstances ISPs might have access to such keys, but in any event the very notion of decrypting the users’ traffic (quite possibly against their will) is antithetical to most norms, policies, and laws concerning privacy of communications. In discussing IPSec, an end-to-end encryption technology that obscures all traffic content, the document notes that “aspects related to application identification are for further study” – as if some future work may be dedicated to somehow breaking or circumventing IPSec." (https://www.cdt.org/blogs/cdt/2811adoption-traffic-sniffing-standard-fans-wcit-flames)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Google Transparency Report

Google Transparency Report | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

"In this report, we disclose:

Real-time and historical traffic to Google services around the world;
Numbers of removal requests that we receive from copyright owners or governments.
Numbers of user data requests that we receive from government agencies and courts."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Apple patent could remotely disable protesters' phone cameras | ZDNet

Apple patent could remotely disable protesters' phone cameras | ZDNet | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

"A new patent, granted to Apple, could prevent academic cheating, cinema interruptions, but also see areas of political protest activity 'ring-fenced' disabling phone and tablet cameras.

(...) It's clear that although Apple may implement the technology, it would not be Apple's decision to activate the 'feature,' such as a remote-switch -- it would be down governments, businesses and network owners to set such policies.

Those policies would be activated by GPS, and Wi-Fi or mobile base-stations, which would ring-fence ("geofence") around a building, a protest, or a sensitive area to prevent phone cameras from taking pictures or recording video.

Other features, such as email or connecting to non-authorized networks -- such as working in the office and connecting to a non-work network on a company-owned device -- could be set, for example.

This sort of 'feature' would not bode well for journalists taking photos and citizens recording acts of state violence or police brutality in areas where ordinary people are facing increasing crackdowns on civil and human rights."

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

After controversy, Facebook promises stricter scrutiny over research

After controversy, Facebook promises stricter scrutiny over research | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Facebook is planning stricter scrutiny when conducting research. Facebook came under fire for a 2012 study that manipulated users' newsfeeds without their knowledge.
Artur Alves's insight:

«

There will be a stricter review of requests for research, for internal work or academic purposes, that deals with personal content or specific groups of people, Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer wrote.

He did not elaborate on the new guidelines.

«

 

To be continued, then...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Facebook, Zynga beat wiretap lawsuits - but allegations were reinstated

Court, however, revives allegations Facebook breached its terms of service.
Artur Alves's insight:

«Facebook and Zynga have defeated class-action lawsuits accusing the companies of civil wiretapping allegations connected to advertising practices.

The Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals, in a joint opinion filed last week on the two lawsuits [PDF], ruled the advertising practices at issue did not involve wiretapping. The San Francisco-based appeals court, however, reinstated allegations that Facebook violated its terms of service for its users, which now number about 1.2 billion.«

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Artur Alves from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Is Complete Online Privacy Possible? Infographic

Is Complete Online Privacy Possible? Infographic | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Check out this Infographic to learn everything that is there about Cookies. Is it harmful? Is it helpful? Do Cookies actually track your activities and land you in trouble?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Linda Denty's curator insight, January 27, 7:35 PM

Thanks Ana for sharing this. 

Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

NSA phone surveillance program likely unconstitutional, federal judge rules

NSA phone surveillance program likely unconstitutional, federal judge rules | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Collection of US phone metadata 'likely' in breach of fourth amendment as judge describes scope of programe as 'Orwellian'
Artur Alves's insight:

"A federal judge in Washington ruled on Monday that the bulk collection of Americans’ telephone records by the National Security Agency is likely to violate the US constitution, in the most significant legal setback for the agency since the publication of the first surveillance disclosures by the whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Judge Richard Leon declared that the mass collection of metadata probably violates the fourth amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, and was "almost Orwellian" in its scope. In a judgment replete with literary swipes against the NSA, he said James Madison, the architect of the US constitution, would be "aghast" at the scope of the agency’s collection of Americans' communications data."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

6 reasons we share too much online

6 reasons we share too much online | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
People claim they care about their privacy, and yet…
Artur Alves's insight:

"Our struggle to weigh the importance of online privacy reflects a classic case of what economists call "bounded rationality." That is, the ability to decide things rationally is constrained by a blinkered understanding of how those decisions might affect us.

Because becoming an expert on privacy issues is so time consuming, we tend to fall back on a variety of shorthand ways to make decisions based on our own impressions. One well-documented example is that people tend to conflate security and privacy. They might assume, for instance, that their privacy is protected by merchants that offer encrypted online transactions. Or they may interpret the mere presence of a privacy seal or privacy policy on a website as sign of protection.

Our bounded rationality on privacy matters makes us more vulnerable to all sorts of persuasion tactics aimed at getting us to disclose things. Behold the following behavioral examples of how, even if we really care about online privacy, we're easily prodded into behaving as though we don't."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

The NSA's mass and indiscriminate spying on Brazilians

The NSA's mass and indiscriminate spying on Brazilians | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Glenn Greenwald: As it does in many non-adversarial countries, the surveillance agency is bulk collecting the communications of millions of citizens of Brazil
Artur Alves's insight:

Glenn Greenwald reports:

 

"[T]he NSA has, for years, systematically tapped into the Brazilian telecommunication network and indiscriminately intercepted, collected and stored the email and telephone records of millions of Brazilians. The story follows an article in Der Spiegel last week, written by Laura Poitras and reporters from that paper, detailing the NSA's mass and indiscriminate collection of the electronic communications of millions of Germans. There are many more populations of non-adversarial countries which have been subjected to the same type of mass surveillance net by the NSA: indeed, the list of those which haven't been are shorter than those which have. The claim that any other nation is engaging in anything remotely approaching indiscriminate worldwide surveillance of this sort is baseless."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Millennials and Privacy in the Information Age: Can They Coexist?

Rapid advancement in information technologies (IT) has created dramatic changes in many aspects of society. Changes in communication's economics now enable fast, easy, and cheap mass dissemination of information.
Artur Alves's insight:

"Since Millennials continue posting growing
pieces of their lives, actions
that cannot be undone, new legislation
should limit the purpose and
use of information obtained from
the web. Usually, people know it is
forbidden to use a credit card even
if it was found on the street. However,
using other and sometimes
much more sensitive personal
information obtained on the web is
considered to be legitimate. Laws
that regulate conflicting interests
should play a more active role balancing
“the right to be left alone”
and “the right to know.” It is time
for some new laws addressing the
policy vacuum that continues to
widen quickly, or else, current
innocent social networks’ status
updates may haunt the naive user
for years to come."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Facebook's Graph Search tool causes increasing privacy concerns

Facebook's Graph Search tool causes increasing privacy concerns | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
New blog aims to show how those who share photos, personal information and 'likes' on Facebook could see privacy invaded
Artur Alves's insight:

Mounting concerns on how changes in privacy policy and search algorithms can compromise private information or, to put it more realistically, information that people thought it would be ok to share in FB.

Snip:

"When asked for comment, Facebook said that Graph Search does not change members' existing privacy settings, and only shows what can be seen elsewhere on the site according to what people have chosen to share."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

U.S. Spy Law Authorizes Mass Surveillance of European Citizens: Report

U.S. Spy Law Authorizes Mass Surveillance of European Citizens: Report | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Europeans, take note: The U.S. government has granted itself authority to secretly snoop on you. That’s according to a new report produced for the European Parliament, which has warned that a U.S.
Artur Alves's insight:

International digital communication networks surveillance at a global scale. One of the consequences (long foreseen) is mass surveillance across borders, esp. non-UScitizens (in this case, Europeans), who have little or no legal protection under national law. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

'I've Got Nothing to Hide' and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy by Daniel Solove :: SSRN

'I've Got Nothing to Hide' and Other Misunderstandings of Privacy by Daniel Solove :: SSRN | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

"When asked about government surveillance and data mining, many people respond by declaring: "I've got nothing to hide." According to the nothing to hide argument, there is no threat to privacy unless the government uncovers unlawful activity, in which case a person has no legitimate justification to claim that it remain private. The nothing to hide argument and its variants are quite prevalent, and thus are worth addressing. In this essay, Solove critiques the nothing to hide argument and exposes its faulty underpinnings."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

How to Remove Your Google Search History Before Google's New Privacy Policy Takes Effect | Electronic Frontier Foundation

"If you want to keep Google from combining your Web History with the data they have gathered about you in their other products, such as YouTube or Google Plus, you may want to remove all items from your Web History and stop your Web History from being recorded in the future."

 

more...
No comment yet.