Gentlemachines
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Gentlemachines
What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
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San Diego school police want to ditch their mine-resistant truck. Here's why they can't.

San Diego school police want to ditch their mine-resistant truck. Here's why they can't. | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
After Ferguson, many towns are trying to return military gear supplied by the Defense Department—and finding it impossible.
Artur Alves's insight:

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Even before police militarization made the news, hundreds of police departments were finding that grenade launchers, military firearms, and armored vehicles aren't very useful to community policing. When Chelan County police officers requested one armored car in 2000—the request that landed them three tanks—they pictured a vehicle that could withstand bullets, not land mines. Law enforcement agencies across the country have quietly returned more than 6,000 unwanted or unusable items to the Pentagon in the last 10 years, according to Defense Department data provided to Mother Jones by a spokeswoman for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), who has spearheaded a Senate investigation of the Pentagon program that is arming local police. Thousands more unwanted items have been transferred to other police departments.

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Entangled Webs: Forensic Facticity and the Construction of Police Work

The effect of television shows featuring police officers and their work has attracted considerable attention from media scholars, particularly given burgeoning interest in the so-called CSI effect. However, few studies have taken on the question of how police officers interact with mediated representations of themselves. Drawing from a series of 1-on-1 interviews and a focus group conducted with members of the New York Police Department, the author argues that cop shows occupy an intermediate space, located between the daily experiences of the job and the television programs that are supposed to fit squarely within the realm of fiction. Her study suggests that the boundaries of this intermediate space have become increasingly blurred, leading to a fragmented reading of programs by police and a challenge to their power in a physical and symbolic sense.
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Cop-Tech: The Inevitable Future of Policing

Cop-Tech: The Inevitable Future of Policing | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Forget the batons - think drones, throwable cameras and something called a Puke Ray. Police are going high tech.
Artur Alves's insight:

«And though cops can be quick to adopt new gadgets, they tend to be sluggish to change tactics. Drone technology might sound fancy, but it just enables strategies (like nabbing crooks before they commit a crime, whatever the cost to civil liberties). Put another way: Drones don’t violate civil liberties; government officials violate civil liberties. So while technology is transforming almost every facet of police work, from intelligence gathering to routine paperwork, policing remains the same at its core: “law enforcement isn’t different than it was 30 years ago,” claims O’Donnell.

Which may be why the scenes from Ferguson unnerved so many. Antiquated, war-hardened mindsets and norms are meeting new 21st -century technologies.«

 

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