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What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
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Don’t Force Google to ‘Forget’, by Jonathan Zittrain

Don’t Force Google to ‘Forget’, by Jonathan Zittrain | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it

THE European Court of Justice ruled on Tuesday that Europeans have a limited “right to be forgotten” by search engines like Google. According to the ruling, an individual can compel Google to remove certain reputation-harming search results that are generated by Googling the individual’s name.

Artur Alves's insight:

Jonathan Zittrain weighs in on the ECJ ruling about the "right to forget".

 

«The court’s decision is both too broad and curiously narrow. It is too broad in that it allows individuals to impede access to facts about themselves found in public documents. This is a form of censorship, one that would most likely be unconstitutional if attempted in the United States. Moreover, the test for removal that search engines are expected to use is so vague — search results are to be excluded if they are “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant” — that search engines are likely to err on the safe side and accede to most requests.

But the decision is oddly narrow in that it doesn’t require that unwanted information be removed from the web. The court doesn’t have a problem with web pages that mention the name of the plaintiff in this case (Mario Costeja González) and the thing he regrets (a property foreclosure); it has a problem only with search engines that list those pages — including this article and possibly the court’s own ruling — as results to a query on the basis of Mr. González’s name. So nothing is being “forgotten,” despite the court’s stated attempt to protect such a right.»

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Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - what is it?

Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act - what is it? | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

CISPA is back on the table. A summary of CISPA, its provisions, consequences and supporters.

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Gagged by Big Ag

Gagged by Big Ag | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Horrific abuse. Rampant contamination. And the crime is…exposing it?
Artur Alves's insight:

"Where once it had pushed back against journalists and whistleblowers after their videos ignited public outrage, now they were looking for a way to prevent such exposure in the first place. Soon afterward, meat industry lobbyists dusted off a long-dormant piece of model legislation crafted by a conservative think tank that would not only make it harder to release undercover video but would criminalize obtaining, possessing, or distributing it to anyone—including journalists or regulators.

...

BACK IN SEPTEMBER 2003, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) released a piece of model legislation it called the Animal and Ecological Terrorism Act. Like so many bills drafted by the free-market think tank, AETA was handed over, ready made, to legislators with the idea that it could be introduced in statehouses across the country with minimal modification. Under the measure, it would become a felony (if damages exceed $500) to enter "an animal or research facility to take pictures by photograph, video camera, or other means," and, in a flush of Patriot Act-era overreaching, those convicted of making such recordings would also be placed on a permanent "terrorist registry.


After a few years on the shelf, ALEC's pet project found new life when radical groups like the Animal Liberation Front and the Earth Liberation Front destroyed testing labs and torched SUVs, prompting FBI deputy director John Lewis to say in 2005 that "the No. 1 domestic terrorism threat is the ecoterrorism, animal-rights movement." The bill was overhauled—modifying the ban on shooting video to "damaging or interfering with the operations of an animal enterprise" and eliminating the section on creating a terrorism watch list. This defanged version, renamed the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, was repackaged to congressional leaders as a needed revision of existing laws protecting medical research from unlawful interference. Though it wouldn't become apparent until much later, it was the beginning of lobbyists and lawmakers conflating radical ALF-type incidents with the undercover work done by PETA and journalists. The bill sailed through the Senate by unanimous consent, and in the House encountered resistance only from Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio). Kucinich warned it would "have a chilling effect on the exercise of the constitutional rights of protest," before a voice vote on the bill allowed it to be ushered through."

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Reddit review puts some teeth into “Aaron's Law”

Bill would change computer fraud law to prevent a Swartz-like prosecution.
Artur Alves's insight:

"

Shortly after the suicide of Internet entrepreneur and activist Aaron Swartz, Silicon Valley lawmaker Zoe Lofgren proposed "Aaron's Law." The bill aims to reform the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), the law under which Swartz was prosecuted for mass-downloading academic documents from MIT's network. Swartz's family has blamed the government prosecution for contributing to his death.

Lofgren submitted a draft of the bill to be reviewed on reddit. After its online critique, a revised version of the bill was published today, with more far-reaching reforms.

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