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What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
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Julian Assange: 'I hope there's much still to come'- New Scientist

Julian Assange: 'I hope there's much still to come'- New Scientist | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
The WikiLeaks co-founder says the internet can be both a tool of political empowerment and the road to dystopia
Artur Alves's insight:

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How do you think people's view of powerful tech companies like Google has changed since Edward Snowden leaked the National Security Agency documents?
People seeing Google's colourful, playful, childish logo billions of times per day creates a sense that the company is harmless and just a service like turning on the tap and getting some water. It is as if it doesn't exist as a political or corporate entity.

When it was revealed that Google was extensively cooperating with the NSA through the PRISM system a bit of the gloss came off. But Google and other Silicon Valley companies like Facebook pivoted after a lot of outrage from their users and tried to separate themselves from the NSA. They made it seem like it was something they were coerced into.

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Q&A: Hacker Historian George Dyson Sits Down With Wired’s Kevin Kelly

Q&A: Hacker Historian George Dyson Sits Down With Wired’s Kevin Kelly | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
The two most powerful technologies of the 20th century—the nuclear bomb and the computer—were invented at the same time and by the same group of young people. But while the history of the Manhattan Project has been well told, the origin of the computer is relatively unknown. In his new book, Turing’s Cathedral, historian George Dyson, who grew up among these proto- hackers in Princeton, New Jersey, tells the story of how Alan Turing, John von Neumann, and a small band of other geniuses not only built the computer but foresaw the world it would create. Dyson talked to wired about the big bang of the digital universe.
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Can Capitalism Tolerate a Democratic Internet? An Interview With Media Expert Robert McChesney

Can Capitalism Tolerate a Democratic Internet? An Interview With Media Expert Robert McChesney | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Anne Elizabeth Moore speaks with McChesney about the future of the Internet, capitalism and Truthout.
Artur Alves's insight:

Interview with R. McChesney, author of Digital Disconnect.

 

"The social order, more often than not, trumps the technology. The best way to understand them is that they work together. Technology does have a great deal of influence in its own right on a society, but the way society is structured, the political economy of the society, has every bit as much influence as - I think generally more influence than - the technology. It shapes the technology. And that's the great battle we have.

The benefits of technology are, I think, obvious. But what's less easy to see and understand are the drawbacks: the price we pay, what's being lost. And what some of the at-times frightening prospects are of the current path we're on. There's very little discussion of these."

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