Gentlemachines
Follow
Find tag "ebook"
2.5K views | +0 today
Gentlemachines
What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Cory Doctorow - How Amazon is holding Hachette hostage

Cory Doctorow - How Amazon is holding Hachette hostage | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
By allowing Amazon to put a lock on its products, Hachette has allowed Amazon to usurp its relationship
with its customers. By Cory Doctorow
Artur Alves's insight:

«For some three weeks now, books from the Hachette publishing group – one of the "big five" publishers who dominate the globe – have been largely unavailable through Amazon.com. Amazon has taken away the pre-order buttons on forthcoming Hachette titles, and current Hachette titles are either not for sale (Amazon helpfully recommends used copies from its reseller network, as well as similar books from competing publishers), or are listed as being out of stock for the next several weeks.

The action was precipitated by the failure of Amazon and Hachette to come to terms on their next ebook sales-deal. Amazon is far and away the most successful ebook retailer in the world, and Hachette, like all the major publishers, depends on ebook revenue as a key piece of its bottom line. As the dispute drags on, it's becoming clear that Hachette needs Amazon more than Amazon needs Hachette.

(...)

Hachette, more than any other publisher in the industry, has had a single minded insistence on DRM since the earliest days. It's likely that every Hachette ebook ever sold has been locked with some company's proprietary DRM, and therein lies the rub.

(...)

It is an own-goal masterstroke. It is precisely because Hachette has been so successful in selling its ebooks through Amazon that it can't afford to walk away from the retailer. By allowing Amazon to put a lock on its products whose key only Amazon possessed, Hachette has allowed Amazon to utterly usurp its relationship with its customers. The law of DRM means that neither the writer who created a book, nor the publisher who invested in it, gets to control its digital destiny: the lion's share of copyright control goes to the ebook retailer whose sole contribution to the book was running it through a formatting script that locked it up with Amazon's DRM.

«

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Major Dutch publisher abandons DRM | The Bookseller

Major Dutch publisher abandons DRM | The Bookseller | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Book Publishing Industry News. Regular news updates from The Bookseller's news desk. The latest press reports about the publishing sector and updates from the City
Artur Alves's insight:

Crippling your own product with DRM is a rather poor business model. Replacing it with digital watermarking is a less invasive option, while still keeping  control of what is really important: not how the books are spread, but what is the real readership.

 

PS: Rear the comment section of this piece

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Artur Alves
Scoop.it!

Young adult readers 'prefer printed to ebooks'

Young adult readers 'prefer printed to ebooks' | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Survey finds that 62% of 16 to 24-year-olds prefer traditional books over their digital equivalents
Artur Alves's insight:

The digital economy does not need to overreach.

 

"Sixteen to 24-year-olds are known as the super-connected generation, obsessed with snapping selfies or downloading the latest mobile apps, so it comes as a surprise to learn that 62% prefer print books to ebooks.

Asked about preferences for physical products versus digital content, printed books jump out as the media most desired in material form, ahead of movies (48%), newspapers and magazines (47%), CDs (32%), and video games (31%)."

more...
No comment yet.