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What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
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The ugly afterlife of crowdfunding projects that never ship and never end

The ugly afterlife of crowdfunding projects that never ship and never end | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Even projects crowdfunded to excess enter tense, never-ending development hell.
Artur Alves's insight:

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The public life-cycle of a Kickstarter rarely ends in tragedy. Often, if a Kickstarter manages to get covered by the media before its funding round end, or even starts, it can meet its goal within days, and superfluous funds continue to roll in over the next few weeks. By the time its crowdfunding stage closes, the creators, backers, and media alike are excited and proud to have ushered this new project so quickly to a place of prosperity, eager for it to continue to grow.

Plenty of projects manage to deliver the goods, even if the timeline slides a bit. That was the case with Tim Schafer's Kickstarter game Broken Age. If creators miss deadlines, backers typically continue to receive updates via e-mail and the Kickstarter page. But sometimes the end of funding is the beginning of a slide into radio silence, which ultimately turns into few or no backer orders fulfilled, and no satisfactory explanation for why the project didn't pan out according to the orderly delivery schedule the creators promised.

A project can go off the rails and fail even after its funding succeeds for a number of reasons. There can be unforeseen costs, or design problems, or a team member quits or fails to deliver their part of the project. Often, when a project skids to a halt, the final updates are obscured from the public and sent only to backers, which may be part of the reason failures are often not well-publicized. Occasionally, backers who receive them pass them on or post them publicly on forums, which is as good as it gets in terms of letting the outside world know a project did not ultimately pan out.

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Timeline: How République Squeaked Out a Kickstarter Success | Game|Life | Wired.com

Timeline: How République Squeaked Out a Kickstarter Success | Game|Life | Wired.com | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
At 7:58 a.m. Pacific Friday morning, a game called République (pronounced "Republic") finally reached its $500,000 funding goal on Kickstarter with only six hours to go after one of the most tumultuous month-long campaigns in Kickstarter history.
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When A Kickstarter Campaign Fails, Does Anyone Get The Money Back? : NPR

On Kickstarter, the largest crowd-funding site, a handful of entrepreneurs have raised millions of dollars more than they expected.
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