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Gentlemachines
What's new at the crossroads of culture, technology and science
Curated by Artur Alves
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This recycling bin is following you

This recycling bin is following you | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Update (Aug. 12): City of London halts recycling bins tracking phones of passers-by Recycling bins in the City of London are monitoring the phones of passers-by, so advertisers can target messages at people whom the bins recognize.
Artur Alves's insight:

This program is now being discontinued - http://qz.com/114174/city-of-london-halts-recycling-bins-tracking-phones-of-passers-by/


"Recycling bins in the City of London are monitoring the phones of passers-by, so advertisers can target messages at people whom the bins recognize.

Renew, the startup behind the scheme, installed 100 recycling bins with digital screens around London before the 2012 Olympics. Advertisers can buy space on the internet-connected bins, and the city gets 5% of the airtime to display public information. More recently, though, Renew outfitted a dozen of the bins with gadgets that track smartphones.

The idea is to bring internet tracking cookies to the real world. The bins record a unique identification number, known as a MAC address, for any nearby phones and other devices that have Wi-Fi turned on. That allows Renew to identify if the person walking by is the same one from yesterday, even her specific route down the street and how fast she is walking."

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When we talk about the Internet, we are talking about the bone marrow of contemporary monopoly capitalism | openDemocracy

When we talk about the Internet, we are talking about the bone marrow of contemporary monopoly capitalism | openDemocracy | Gentlemachines | Scoop.it
Artur Alves's insight:

Dan Hind interviews Robert McChesney:


"On the Internet advertising is rapidly shifting to what is called “smart” advertising, meaning that advertisers purchase desired audiences through huge ad networks run by the likes of Google, Microsoft and Yahoo. These networks then find the desired target audiences at whatever website they go to. There is very little money on this for journalism websites, or content producers writ large. In the USA newspaper websites got 100 percent of the revenues for their digital ads in 2003; by 2010 they figure was down to 20 percent. I suspect it is even less today.


(...)


~

Google and other Internet companies do take the moral high ground on some issues, but all of them have issues where they rub shoulders with the lowliest sewer rats. In Google’s case it is privacy, and monopoly law, and taxation.
The Internet today is dominated by a handful of spectacularly huge monopolies. Network economics encourages monopoly and companies like Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, Apple, Amazon, eBay, AT&T, Verizon, Comcast often have monopoly power in their core markets not unlike what John D. Rockefeller had with Standard Oil in the late 19th century. In the United States today, 12 of the 31 most valuable public traded corporations—all with a value over $100 billion—are Internet corporations. There are only three “too big to fail” banks on the list, for comparison, and only three energy companies. When we talk about the Internet, we are talking about the bone marrow of contemporary monopoly capitalism.

So that means, yes, we are going to get the greatest and most impressive blast of corporate public relations bullshit in the history of the human race."


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