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Norwich presents leading genomic researcher J. Craig Venter in Spring Todd ... - vtdigger.org

Norwich presents leading genomic researcher J. Craig Venter in Spring Todd ... - vtdigger.org | Genomics | Scoop.it
Norwich presents leading genomic researcher J. Craig Venter in Spring Todd ...
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One of the first scientists to sequence the human genome and leader of the team responsible for creating the first cell with a synthetic genome, Dr.
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Sanford gets $125M to boost for genetics research

Sanford gets $125M to boost for genetics research | Genomics | Scoop.it
Another blockbuster donation from T. Denny Sanford, this one for $125 million, will launch a new effort by Sanford Health to merge genomic medicine with everyday primary care for adults.
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Illumina's New Low-Cost Genome Machine Will Change Health Care Forever

Illumina's New Low-Cost Genome Machine Will Change Health Care Forever | Genomics | Scoop.it
The biotech company is betting people will pay $1,000 each to find out how they might die (#genomics Will you pay $1000 to find out how you might die?
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Single-cell genomics at scale: Genome sequencing enhances our understanding of the biological world

Single-cell genomics at scale: Genome sequencing enhances our understanding of the biological world | Genomics | Scoop.it

Genome sequencing is providing blueprints for the evolutionary and functional diversity that shapes the biosphere. However, microbial genomes that are currently available are of limited phylogenetic breadth, owing to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. Researchers have recently applied single-cell genomics to target and sequence 201 uncultivated archaeal and bacterial cells from nine diverse habitats belonging to 29 major mostly uncharted branches of the tree of life, so-called ‘microbial dark matter’. With this additional genomic information, they were able to resolve many intra- and inter-phylum-level relationships and to propose two new superphyla. They uncovered unexpected metabolic features that extend our understanding of biology and challenge established boundaries between the three domains of life. These include a novel amino acid use for the opal stop codon, an archaeal-type purine synthesis in Bacteria and complete sigma factors in Archaea similar to those in Bacteria. The single-cell genomes also served to phylogenetically anchor up to 20% of metagenomic reads in some habitats, facilitating organism-level interpretation of ecosystem function. This recent study greatly expands the genomic representation of the tree of life and provides a systematic step towards a better understanding of biological evolution on our planet.

 

Microorganisms are the most diverse and abundant cellular life forms on Earth, occupying every possible metabolic niche. The large majority of these organisms have not been obtained in pure culture and we have only recently become aware of their presence mainly through cultivation-independent molecular surveys based on conserved marker genes (chiefly small subunit ribosomal RNA; SSU rRNA) or through shotgun sequencing (metagenomics). As an increasing number of environments are deeply sequenced using next-generation technologies, diversity estimates for Bacteria and Archaea continue to rise, with the number of microbial ‘species’ predicted to reach well into the millions. According to SSU rRNA-based phylogeny, these fall into at least 60 major lines of descent (phyla or divisions) within the bacterial and archaeal domains of which half have no cultivated representatives (so-called ‘candidate’ phyla). This biased representation is even more fundamentally skewed when considering that more than 88% of all microbial isolates belong to only four bacterial phyla, the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Genome sequencing of microbial isolates naturally reflects this cultivation bias. Recently, a systematic effort, the Genomic Encyclopaedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) Project, has been initiated to maximize coverage of the diversity captured in microbial isolates by phylogenetically targeted genome sequencing. However, GEBA does not address candidate phyla that represent a major unexplored portion of microbial diversity, and have been referred to as microbial dark matter (MDM).

 

Metagenomics can obtain genome sequences from uncultivated microorganisms through direct sequencing of DNA from the environment. In some instances, draft or even complete genomes of candidate phyla have been recovered solely from metagenomic data. A complementary cultivation-independent approach for obtaining genomes from candidate phyla is single-cell genomics; the amplification and sequencing of DNA from single cells obtained directly from environmental samples. This approach can be used for targeted recovery of genomes and has been applied to members of several candidate phyla. In particular, natural populations that have a high degree of genomic heterogeneity will be more accessible through single-cell genomics than through metagenomics as co-assembly of multiple strains is avoided. Despite these advances in obtaining genomic representation of MDM, no systematic effort has been made to obtain genomes from uncultivated candidate phyla using single-cell whole genome amplification approaches.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Let’s get personal about your genome

Let’s get personal about your genome | Genomics | Scoop.it
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration ruled in November that the DNA kit sold 23andMe, was a “medical device” that has not received regulatory marketing approval.
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Unicorn Genome Published - Homologus

Unicorn Genome Published - Homologus | Genomics | Scoop.it
[...] (@johnpharmd You may like the unicorn story - has implications for Jewish genomics. http://t.co/YYQIe1QA3M)
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A revised timescale for human evolution based on a... [Curr Biol. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
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