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Simultaneous editing of three homoeoalleles in hexaploid bread wheat confers heritable resistance to powdery mildew - Nature Biotech.

Simultaneous editing of three homoeoalleles in hexaploid bread wheat confers heritable resistance to powdery mildew - Nature Biotech. | genome editing | Scoop.it

Wang et al, 2014

Sequence-specific nucleases have been applied to engineer targeted modifications in polyploid genomes1, but simultaneous modification of multiple homoeoalleles has not been reported. Here we use transcription activator–like effector nuclease (TALEN)2,3 and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 (refs. 4,5) technologies in hexaploid bread wheat to introduce targeted mutations in the three homoeoalleles that encode MILDEW- RESISTANCE LOCUS (MLO) proteins6. Genetic redundancy has prevented evaluation of whether mutation of all three MLO alleles in bread wheat might confer resistance to powdery mildew, a trait not found in natural populations7. We show that TALEN-induced mutation of all three TaMLO homoeologs in the same plant confers heritable broad-spectrum resistanceto powdery mildew. We further use CRISPR-Cas9 technologyto generate transgenic wheat plants that carry mutations inthe TaMLO-A1 allele. We also demonstrate the feasibility of engineering targeted DNA insertion in bread wheat through nonhomologous end joining of the double-strand breaks caused by TALENs. Our findings provide a methodological framework to improve polyploid crops.


Via dromius
Fesquet didier's insight:

this open the way for developping non toxic wheat species...good for celiac people...maybe one day...hopes for a slice of pizza :-)

 

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Mary Williams's curator insight, July 31, 2014 6:33 AM

I'm trying to catch up with what I missed while traveling. I think this is one of the more exciting papers that came out in the past few weeks, and I'm a bit surprised that it didn't get more press coverage.

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Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Biotech Pharma Innovation in Immuno-Oncology & beyond. Cancer - Immunology - Immunotherapy.
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Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | genome editing | Scoop.it
Crypt stem cells represent the cells of origin for intestinal neoplasia. Both mouse and human intestinal stem cells can be cultured in medium containing the stem-cell-niche factors WNT, R-spondin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and noggin over long time periods as epithelial organoids that remain genetically and phenotypically stable. Here we utilize CRISPR/Cas9 technology for targeted gene modification of four of the most commonly mutated colorectal cancer genes (APC, P53 (also known as TP53), KRAS and SMAD4) in cultured human intestinal stem cells. Mutant organoids can be selected by removing individual growth factors from the culture medium. Quadruple mutants grow independently of all stem-cell-niche factors and tolerate the presence of the P53 stabilizer nutlin-3. Upon xenotransplantation into mice, quadruple mutants grow as tumours with features of invasive carcinoma. Finally, combined loss of APC and P53 is sufficient for the appearance of extensive aneuploidy, a hallmark of tumour progression.

Via Dominique Blanchard
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Fast and sensitive detection of indels induced by precise gene targeting - Nucl. Acids Res.

Yang et al, 2015

The nuclease-based gene editing tools are rapidly transforming capabilities for altering the genome of cells and organisms with great precision and in high throughput studies. A major limitation in application of precise gene editing lies in lack of sensitive and fast methods to detect and characterize the induced DNA changes. Precise gene editing induces double-stranded DNA breaks that are repaired by error-prone non-homologous end joining leading to introduction of insertions and deletions (indels) at the target site. These indels are often small and difficult and laborious to detect by traditional methods. Here we present a method for fast, sensitive and simple indel detection that accurately defines indel sizes down to ±1 bp. The method coined IDAA for Indel Detection by Amplicon Analysis is based on tri-primer amplicon labelling and DNA capillary electrophoresis detection, and IDAA is amenable for high throughput analysis.

 


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Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Open Access to Scholarly Publishing
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Editor quits journal over pay-for-expedited peer-review offer

Authors can pay open-access journal extra to get reviewed in less than 3 weeks


Via Bernard Rentier
Fesquet didier's insight:

Une nouvelle évolution du business  qu'est devenu la publication scientifique. Chapeau à cet éditeur qui a préfère démissionner.

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Bernard Rentier's curator insight, March 28, 3:50 PM
Not unexpected. "Pay-to-publish" has an inherent loophole in itself and it reflects a serious ethical problem...
Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Horizon Discovery - precision genome editing
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Therapeutic genome editing: prospects and challenges : Nature Medicine : Nature Publishing Group

Therapeutic genome editing: prospects and challenges : Nature Medicine : Nature Publishing Group | genome editing | Scoop.it
“Turitz Cox et al, 2015Recent advances in the development of genome editing technologies based on programmable nucleases have substantially improved our ability to make precise changes in the genomes of eukaryotic cells. Genome editing is already broadening our ability to elucidate the contribution of genetics to disease by facilitating the creation of more accurate cellular and animal models of pathological processes. A particularly tantalizing application of programmable nucleases is the potential to directly correct genetic mutations in affected tissues and cells to treat diseases that are refractory to traditional therapies. Here we discuss current progress toward developing programmable nuclease–based therapies as well as future prospects and challenges.”
Via dromius, Horizon Discovery
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A one-grant limit: NIH institute puts squeeze on flush investigators

Those with generous no-strings funding will be limited to one grant.

In the latest example of budget stretching at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the agency’s basic science institute is imposing a strict one-grant limit on scientists who already have plentiful no-strings support. The move could free up at least $6 million, or 25 grants for other scientists. (...) - ScienceInsider, by Jocelyn Kaiser, 14 January 2015


Via Collectif PAPERA
Fesquet didier's insight:

contre le cumul des mandats des politiques...mais aussi contre le cumul des gros  financements...simple bon sens de nos jours.

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Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Univers(al)ités
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L’avenir difficile du financement de la recherche

L’avenir difficile du financement de la recherche | genome editing | Scoop.it

Via Bernard Rentier
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Genome-wide detection of DNA double-stranded breaks induced by engineered nucleases - Nature Biotech.

Genome-wide detection of DNA double-stranded breaks induced by engineered nucleases - Nature Biotech. | genome editing | Scoop.it

Frock et al, 2014

Although great progress has been made in the characterization of the off-target effects of engineered nucleases, sensitive and unbiased genome-wide methods for the detection of off-target cleavage events and potential collateral damage are still lacking. Here we describe a linear amplification–mediated modification of a previously published high-throughput, genome-wide, translocation sequencing (HTGTS) method that robustly detects DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) generated by engineered nucleases across the human genome based on their translocation to other endogenous or ectopic DSBs. HTGTS with different Cas9:sgRNA or TALEN nucleases revealed off-target hotspot numbers for given nucleases that ranged from a few or none to dozens or more, and extended the number of known off-targets for certain previously characterized nucleases more than tenfold. We also identified translocations between bona fide nuclease targets on homologous chromosomes, an undesired collateral effect that has not been described previously. Finally, HTGTS confirmed that the Cas9D10A paired nickase approach suppresses off-target cleavage genome-wide.


Via dromius
Fesquet didier's insight:

off target ou pas off targets...the debate is still on going...hope the wt has reported does not induce that much OT...can't believe

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"La communication scientifique à la croisée des chemins : Enjeux et stratégies institutionnels".

Bernard Rentier & Paul Thirion - Canal C2 Strasbourg - video


Via Bernard Rentier
Fesquet didier's insight:

les abonnements coutent l'equivalent d'une porche chaque 10jours!

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Bernard Rentier's curator insight, December 15, 2014 9:57 AM

Les diapos de présentation : http://hdl.handle.net/2268/173664

BULAC 's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:17 AM

Une présentation des enjeux de la communication scientifique et du rôle des revues aujourd'hui par les deux artisans de la célèbre archive institutionnelle de l'université de Liège.

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Making designer mutants in all kinds of model organisms

Making designer mutants in all kinds of model organisms | genome editing | Scoop.it

Recent advances in the targeted modification of complex eukaryotic genomes have unlocked a new era of genome engineering. From the pioneering work using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), to the advent of the versatile and specific TALEN systems, and most recently the highly accessible CRISPR/Cas9 systems, we now possess an unprecedented ability to analyze developmental processes using sophisticated designer genetic tools. Excitingly, these robust and simple genomic engineering tools also promise to revolutionize developmental studies using less well established experimental organisms.


Modern developmental biology was born out of the fruitful marriage between traditional embryology and genetics. Genetic tools, together with advanced microscopy techniques, serve as the most fundamental means for developmental biologists to elucidate the logistics and the molecular control of growth, differentiation and morphogenesis. For this reason, model organisms with sophisticated and comprehensive genetic tools have been highly favored for developmental studies. Advances made in developmental biology using these genetically amenable models have been well recognized. The Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1995 to Edward B. Lewis, Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard and Eric F. Wieschaus for their discoveries on the ‘Genetic control of early structural development’ usingDrosophila melanogaster, and again in 2002 to John Sulston, Robert Horvitz and Sydney Brenner for their discoveries of ‘Genetic regulation of development and programmed cell death’ using the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. These fly and worm systems remain powerful and popular models for invertebrate development studies, while zebrafish (Danio rerio), the dual frog species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis, rat (Rattus norvegicus), and particularly mouse (Mus musculus) represent the most commonly used vertebrate model systems. To date, random or semi-random mutagenesis (‘forward genetic’) approaches have been extraordinarily successful at advancing the use of these model organisms in developmental studies. With the advent of reference genomic data, however, sequence-specific genomic engineering tools (‘reverse genetics’) enable targeted manipulation of the genome and thus allow previously untestable hypotheses of gene function to be addressed.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, dromius
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La recherche, ce n'est pas une dépense, c'est un investissement

La recherche, ce n'est pas une dépense, c'est un investissement | genome editing | Scoop.it

Lettre ouverte pour appeler les chercheurs à se mobiliser face aux coupures passées et à venir dans les budgets de la recherche au Québec.


Via Bernard Rentier
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Bernard Rentier's curator insight, November 22, 2014 1:55 AM
En parallèle frappant avec notre "SAUVONS_BELSPO": le combat pour un sauvetage de la recherche est le même partout, hélas. Généralement considérée comme un luxe de pays nanti, elle est toujours parmi les premières cibles des restrictions lorsque l'austérité s'impose. Il est pourtant démontré à suffisance qu'elle est surtout indispensable à ce moment-là, comme générateur d'innovation.
Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Genome Engineering & Reprogramming
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Live pigs produced from genome edited zygotes : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Live pigs produced from genome edited zygotes : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | genome editing | Scoop.it
Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) genome editing technology enables site directed engineering of the genome. Here we demonstrate for the first time that both TALEN and ZFN injected directly into pig zygotes can produce live genome edited pigs. Monoallelic as well as heterozygous and homozygous biallelic events were identified, significantly broadening the use of genome editor technology in livestock by enabling gene knockout in zygotes from any chosen mating.

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SRB's curator insight, November 4, 2014 11:54 AM

Editing frequency was 2% of transferred embryos or 16% of piglets born.  


PMID: 24108318 

Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Genome Engineering & Reprogramming
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Off-target assessment of CRISPR-cas9 guiding RNAs in human iPS and mouse ES cells

Off-target assessment of CRISPR-cas9 guiding RNAs in human iPS and mouse ES cells | genome editing | Scoop.it

"The CRIPSR-Cas9 system consists of a site-specific, targetable DNA nuclease that holds great potential in gene editing and genome-wide screening applications. In order to apply the CRISPR-Cas9 system to these assays successfully, the rate at which Cas9 induces DNA breaks at undesired loci must be understood. We characterised the rate of Cas9 off-target activity in typical Cas9 experiments in two human and one mouse cell lines. We analysed the Cas9 cutting activity of 12 gRNAs in both their targeted sites and ∼90 predicted off-target sites per gRNA. In a Cas9-based knock-out experiment, gRNAs induced detectable Cas9 cutting activity in all on-target sites and in only a few off-target sites genome-wide in human 293FT, human iPS cells and mouse ES cells. Both the cutting rates and DNA repair patterns were highly correlated between the two human cell lines in both on-target and off-target sites. In clonal Cas9 cutting analysis in mouse ES cells, bi-allelic Cas9 cutting was observed with low off-target activity. Our results show that off-target activity of Cas9 is low and predictable by the degree of sequence identity between the gRNA and a potential off-target site. Off-target Cas9 activity can be minimized by selecting gRNAs with few off-target sites of near-complementarity."


Via SRB
Fesquet didier's insight:

le débat du off target encore et encore...

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SRB's curator insight, November 10, 2014 2:50 PM

Assessment of Cas9 off target rates in human 293FT, human iPS cells and mouse ES cells.

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L'incroyable bourde des universités françaises : elles paieront 2 fois leurs publications chez Elsevier

Rue89 explique le "deal"


Via Bernard Rentier
Fesquet didier's insight:

Une somme colossale si on compare aux 300m d'euros qui arrivent à la paillasse dans les labos...

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, November 11, 2014 2:22 AM
Ce n'est pas nouveau! mais les multiples instances françaises imaginaient être les seules à faire de la recherche et restaient dans leur splendide isolement... Universités, CHU, CNRS, Inserm...Bravo au journaliste d'enfin afficher cette incohérence!
Fesquet didier's comment, November 11, 2014 6:40 AM
Oui, il faut suivre l'exemple des pays bas...nous produisons le contenu..et ils font des marges outrancières sur notre dos
Nicolas Pettiaux's curator insight, March 27, 3:47 AM

Sans doute encore une erreur magistrale qui va couter des fortunes, entrainer une dépendance du monde de la recherche aux intérêts privés et handicaper le financement de la recherche indépendante à hauteur de près de 40 M€ par an pendant 5 ans. Une seule solution : le byocott et un suivi parlementaire complet et public de cette question d'importance vitale. Oui des vies humaines en dépendent.

 

Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Passionate About Science and Technology!
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WATCH: Here's an easy way to subtract by adding

WATCH: Here's an easy way to subtract by adding | genome editing | Scoop.it
Okay, so let's just get this one out of the way first - there are calculators, and they're actually pretty amazing at doing maths. But it's time to dust that tired, old brain off so we can learn a great little arithmetic trick, courtesy of the...

Via Olgy Gary
Fesquet didier's insight:

cela me semble en fait..compliqué!

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Olgy Gary's curator insight, May 5, 11:03 PM

Fascinating... and sort of fun to see it worked out. According to the Minute Physics 3.13 min. video, it's how computers carry out subtractions... they do it by adding! 

Rescooped by Fesquet didier from Higher Education and academic research
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The war against humanities at Britain's universities

The war against humanities at Britain's universities | genome editing | Scoop.it

Our universities are squeezing every ounce of efficiency out of lecturers and focusing on the ‘profitable’ areas of science, tech and maths. Could the humanities be wiped out? (...) - The Guardian, by Alex Preston, 29 March 2015


Via Collectif PAPERA
Fesquet didier's insight:

un phénomène général...encore un coup de l'excellence :-)

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Physical scientists offer outside-the-box idea for funding U.S. basic research

Physical scientists offer outside-the-box idea for funding U.S. basic research | genome editing | Scoop.it

Researchers float idea of National Research Bank, a $100 billion endowment.

 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS—Researchers across the United States are well aware that times are tight. Despite a recent budget proposal from the Obama administration to increase spending on federal R&D by 7% next year, dollars flowing to research have largely been flat in recent years, and declining when inflation is taken into account. The long-term outlook is even worse. Growing federal commitments to Medicare, Medicaid, social security, and interest on the federal debt continue to chew up a greater proportion of the federal budget. The money for “discretionary” items that’s left over—including R&D—is expected to drop to 23% of the federal budget by 2040, down from 67% in 1970 and 36% in 2012. So it’s perhaps no surprise that basic researchers are beginning to look for new sources of support. (...) - Science, by Robert F. Service, 4 March 2015


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Mapping the precision of genome editing - Nature Biotech.

Mapping the precision of genome editing - Nature Biotech. | genome editing | Scoop.it

Gabriel et al, 2015

Precise genome engineering in live cells at any locus promises to facilitate basic research and to enable personalized medicine. In particular, the recent development of the CRISPR-Cas9 system into a versatile and easy-to-use editing tool1 has been celebrated as a scientific breakthrough in the field. As genome engineering is adapted to clinical applications, a high level of precision—especially the avoidance of editing at sites other than the intended target—will be indispensable. In this issue, three very timely studies2, 3, 4 report methods for identifying off-target double-strand breaks produced by CRISPR-associated (Cas)9 nucleases and another class of programmable nucleases known as transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs). Wang et al.2 and Tsai et al.3 rely on integration of a foreign DNA bait sequence into off-target double-strand breaks, whereas Frock et al.4 detect translocations of endogenous genomic sequences to the intended cleavage site (Fig. 1). All three methods attain an unprecedented level of comprehensiveness and sensitivity in off-target detection. The papers also highlight that the specificity of nucleases varies widely and must be evaluated case by case.


Via dromius
Fesquet didier's insight:

encore le debat du OT...!

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Creation of fragrant rice by targeted knockout of the OsBADH2 gene using TALEN technology - Plant Biotech. J.

Creation of fragrant rice by targeted knockout of the OsBADH2 gene using TALEN technology - Plant Biotech. J. | genome editing | Scoop.it

(via T. Lahaye, thx)

Shan et al, 2015

Fragrant rice is favoured worldwide because of its agreeable scent. The presence of a defective badh2 allele encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH2) results in the synthesis of 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2AP), which is a major fragrance compound. Here, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) were engineered to target and disrupt the OsBADH2 gene. Six heterozygous mutants (30%) were recovered from 20 transgenic hygromycin-resistant lines. Sanger sequencing confirmed that these lines had various indel mutations at the TALEN target site. All six transmitted the BADH2 mutations to the T1 generation; and four T1 mutant lines tested also efficiently transmitted the mutations to the T2 generation. Mutant plants carrying only the desired DNA sequence change but not the TALEN transgene were obtained by segregation in the T1 and T2 generations. The 2AP content of rice grains of the T1 lines with homozygous mutations increased from 0 to 0.35–0.75 mg/kg, which was similar to the content of a positive control variety harbouring the badh2-E7 mutation. We also simultaneously introduced three different pairs of TALENs targeting three separate rice genes into rice cells by bombardment and obtained lines with mutations in one, two and all three genes. These results indicate that targeted mutagenesis using TALENs is a useful approach to creating important agronomic traits.


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Quel est le poids du hasard dans l'apparition des cancers ?

Quel est le poids du hasard dans l'apparition des cancers ? | genome editing | Scoop.it

Le Monde.fr version mobile - Selon une étude, deux tiers des tumeurs relèveraient de mutations aléatoires plutôt que de facteurs cancérigènes ou génétiques. Mais deux des cancers les plus répandus n'ont pas été pris en compte.


Via catherine cerisey
Fesquet didier's insight:

Papier de science qui  suscite pas mal de reaction sur  le web,.pas lu mais il me semble assez intuitif qu'un tissu qui  se renouvelle  (prolifere) soit plus sujet à des anomalies survenant dans le comportement cellules souches...mais racontél par un big name..c'est plus sérieux. N'empêche que dans les faits..pas mal de cancer sont induits par nos comportements.. à risque.

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Les nucléases, de fabuleux outils pour la chirurgie du génome : les ... - bulletins-electroniques.com

Les nucléases, de fabuleux outils pour la chirurgie du génome : les ... - bulletins-electroniques.com | genome editing | Scoop.it
Les Bulletins Electroniques des Ambassades de France - un service ADIT
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L'efficacité des politiques publiques pour la recherche en France

L'efficacité des politiques publiques pour la recherche en France | genome editing | Scoop.it

Face à l’échec des réformes engagées depuis dix ans visant à rendre la recherche française plus compétitive sur le plan international, les assises de la recherche ont formulé des propositions, simples et peu coûteuses. (...) - Le Monde, 09/10/2014

  

  


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Plant genome editing by novel tools: TALEN and other sequence specific nucleases

Plant genome editing by novel tools: TALEN and other sequence specific nucleases | genome editing | Scoop.it

(via T. Schreiber, thx!)

Sprink et al, 2014

Genome editing technologies using sequence specific nucleases (SSNs) became a tremendously powerful and precise tool for reverse genetic approaches and applied biology. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in particular, consisting of a free designable DNA binding domain and a nuclease, have been exploited today by a huge number of approaches in many different organisms. The convenience of designing the DNA binding domain and straightforward protocols for their assembly, as well as the broad number of applications in different scientific fields made it Natures method of the year 2011. TALENs act as molecular scissors by introducing double strand breaks (DSBs) to the DNA at a given location. The DSBs are subsequently repaired by the cell itself using different repair pathways such as non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). These mechanisms can lead to deletions, insertions, replacements or larger chromosomal rearrangements. By offering a template DNA it is possible to channel the repair in direction of HR. In this article we review the recent findings in the field of SSN approaches with emphasis on plants.


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Microhomology-mediated end-joining-dependent integration of donor DNA in cells and animals using TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 - Nature Comm.

Microhomology-mediated end-joining-dependent integration of donor DNA in cells and animals using TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 - Nature Comm. | genome editing | Scoop.it

(via T. Schreiber, thx)

Nakade et al, 2014

Genome engineering using programmable nucleases enables homologous recombination (HR)-mediated gene knock-in. However, the labour used to construct targeting vectors containing homology arms and difficulties in inducing HR in some cell type and organisms represent technical hurdles for the application of HR-mediated knock-in technology. Here, we introduce an alternative strategy for gene knock-in using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) mediated by microhomology-mediated end-joining, termed the PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) system. TALEN-mediated PITCh, termed TAL-PITCh, enables efficient integration of exogenous donor DNA in human cells and animals, including silkworms and frogs. We further demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated PITCh, termed CRIS-PITCh, can be applied in human cells without carrying the plasmid backbone sequence. Thus, our PITCh-ing strategies will be useful for a variety of applications, not only in cultured cells, but also in various organisms, including invertebrates and vertebrates.


Via dromius
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and other strategy fo Ki experiments

 

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Megabase-scale deletion using CRISPR/Cas9 to generate a fully haploid human cell line.

Megabase-scale deletion using CRISPR/Cas9 to generate a fully haploid human cell line. | genome editing | Scoop.it

Near-haploid human cell lines are instrumental for genetic screens and genome engineering as gene inactivation is greatly facilitated by the absence of a second gene copy. However, no completely haploid human cell line has been described, hampering the genetic accessibility of a subset of genes. The near-haploid human cell line HAP1 contains a single copy of all chromosomes except for a heterozygous 30-megabase fragment of Chromosome 15. This large fragment encompasses 330 genes and is integrated on the long arm of Chromosome 19. Here, we employ a CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering strategy to excise this sizeable chromosomal fragment and to efficiently and reproducibly derive clones that retain their haploid state. Importantly, spectral karyotyping and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping revealed that engineered-HAPloid (eHAP) cells are fully haploid with no gross chromosomal aberrations induced by Cas9. Furthermore, whole-genome sequence and transcriptome analysis of the parental HAP1 and an eHAP cell line showed that transcriptional changes are limited to the excised Chromosome 15 fragment. Together, we demonstrate the feasibility of efficiently engineering megabase deletions with the CRISPR/Cas9 technology and report the first fully haploid human cell line.An international, peer-reviewed genome sciences journal featuring outstanding original research that offers novel insights into the biology of all organisms


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SRB's curator insight, November 7, 2014 11:39 AM

Large chromosomal deletions were introduced by Cas9 genome engineering to effectively create haploid regions. No chromosomal aberrations were noted.

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How to sequence an entire genome from a single cell | KurzweilAI

How to sequence an entire genome from a single cell | KurzweilAI | genome editing | Scoop.it

The notion that police can identify a suspect based on the tiniest drop of blood or trace of tissue has long been a staple of TV dramas, but scientists at Harvard have now taken the idea a step further. Using just a single human cell, they can reproduce an individual’s entire genome.

 

The researchers developed a method — dubbed MALBAC, short for Multiple Annealing and Looping-based Amplification Cycles — that requires just one cell to reproduce an entire DNA molecule.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
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Ray and Terry's 's curator insight, January 8, 2013 11:27 AM

As reported by KurzweilAI.net, this technique could lead to more nimble cancer treatments and enhanced prenatal screening.