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Discovery of Wound-Healing Genes in Flies Could Mitigate Human Skin Ailments

Discovery of Wound-Healing Genes in Flies Could Mitigate Human Skin Ailments | Genetics | Scoop.it
Biologists at UC San Diego have identified eight genes never before suspected to play a role in wound healing that are called into action near the areas where wounds occur.

 

After injury to the animal epidermis, a variety of genes are transcriptionally activated in nearby cells to regenerate the missing cells and facilitate barrier repair. The range and types of diffusible wound signals that are produced by damaged epidermis and function to activate repair genes during epidermal regeneration remains a subject of very active study in many animals. In Drosophila embryos, serine proteases are locally activated around wound sites, and are also required for localized activation of epidermal repair genes. The serine protease trypsin is sufficient to induce a striking global epidermal wound response without inflicting cell death or compromising the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The fly researchers developed a trypsin wounding treatment as an amplification tool to more fully understand the changes in the Drosophila transcriptome that occur after epidermal injury.

 

By comparing these array results with similar results on mammalian skin wounding they were able to see which evolutionarily conserved pathways are activated after epidermal wounding in very diverse animals. This innovative serine protease-mediated wounding protocol allowed the researchers to identify 8 additional genes that are activated in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of puncture wounds, and the functions of many of these genes suggest novel genetic pathways that may control epidermal wound repair. Additionally, these data augments the evidence that clean puncture wounding can mount a powerful innate immune transcriptional response, with different innate immune genes being activated in an interesting variety of ways. These include puncture-induced activation only in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of wounds, or in all epidermal cells, or specifically in the fat body, or in multiple tissues.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Connor Keesee's curator insight, December 5, 2013 12:36 PM

Would healing & barrier repairing genes found in flies. The genes regenerate missing cells and also repair them. This gene is activated by injury to the epidermis. This discovery was found by biologists at UC San Diego in April. 

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Genetic Researchers Solve Mystery of White Tigers - Sci-News.com

Genetic Researchers Solve Mystery of White Tigers - Sci-News.com | Genetics | Scoop.it
Sci-News.com Genetic Researchers Solve Mystery of White Tigers Sci-News.com A team of genetic scientists led by Dr Shu-Jin Luo from Peking University in Beijing, using whole-genome sequences of white and normally-colored Bengal tigers, has revealed...
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Genetics Study Finds Father’s Age – Not Mother’s – Critical to New Mutations Passed to Offspring

Genetics Study Finds Father’s Age – Not Mother’s – Critical to New Mutations Passed to Offspring | Genetics | Scoop.it
To better understand the cause of new hereditary mutations, the deCODE team sequenced the genomes of 78 Icelandic families with offspring who had a diagnosis of autism or schizophrenia. The team also sequenced the genomes of an additional 1,859 Icelanders, providing a larger comparative population.

 

On average, the investigators found a two mutation per-year increase in offspring with each one-year increase in age of the father. The average age of the father in the study was 29.7 years old. Also, when specifically examining the genomes of families with autism and schizophrenia, the authors identified in offspring mutations in genes previously implicated in the diseases. They also identified two genes, CUL3 and EPHB2, with mutations in an autism patient subgroup.

 

Epidemiological studies in Iceland show the risk of both schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders increases significantly with father’s age at conception, and that the average age of father’s in Iceland (now 33 years-old) at the time a child is conceived is on the rise. The authors noted that demographic change of this kind and magnitude is not unique to Iceland, and it raises the question of whether the reported increase in autism spectrum disorder diagnosis is at least partially due to an increase in the average age of fathers at conception.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Mara
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Mara's curator insight, May 1, 2013 3:55 PM

Interesting.

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Tiny worm sheds light on giant mystery about neurons

Tiny worm sheds light on giant mystery about neurons | Genetics | Scoop.it
Scientists have identified a gene that keeps our nerve fibers from clogging up.
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Genetics - DNA by Francis Crick - Wellcome Collection

Genetics - DNA by Francis Crick - Wellcome Collection | Genetics | Scoop.it
Mention DNA today and immediately the iconic image of the double helix is conjured up - the familiar twisted ladder that carries the codes for the earth's huge variety of life forms. It wasn't always this way.
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Genes play role in wound healing, regulate biological processes in human skin

Biologists at UC San Diego have identified eight genes never before suspected to play a role in wound healing that are called into action near the areas where wounds occur.
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Interesting topics

 

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Are People Born with Bipolar Disorder?

Are People Born with Bipolar Disorder? | Genetics | Scoop.it
Some people argue that no one is born with bipolar disorder but the heritability of bipolar disorder is high and childhood bipolar does exist. (RT @natasha_tracy: Are People Born with #Bipolar Disorder?
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Txchnologist - Camphor Tree Helps Bacteria Make Biofuel Chemically Identical to Petroleum

Txchnologist - Camphor Tree Helps Bacteria Make Biofuel Chemically Identical to Petroleum | Genetics | Scoop.it
Camphor Tree Helps Bacteria Make Biofuel Chemically Identical to Petroleum by Michael Keller Scientists working to make exact chemical copies of fossil fuels from living microbes say they have scored...
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Genes may personalise uterine cancer drugs - ABC Local

Genes may personalise uterine cancer drugs - ABC Local | Genetics | Scoop.it
ABC Local
Genes may personalise uterine cancer drugs
ABC Local
Uterine cancer New subtypes of uterine cancer tumours have been discovered through a large international genetic analysis of the disease that kills thousands of women worldwide each year.
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GM wheat could permanently damage human genetics by silencing hundreds of genes throughout the body

GM wheat could permanently damage human genetics by silencing hundreds of genes throughout the body | Genetics | Scoop.it
It is one of the only major food crops left without a genetically-modified (GM) counterpart, but this could soon change if the Australian government gets its way in approving a GM wheat variety developed by the Commonwealth Scientific and...

Via Hans Gruen, Mara
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What Color Eyes will your Children Have? | Understanding Genetics

For even more information about genetics and eye color, buy our book, When Will Broccoli Taste Like Chocolate, from Amazon here. Then you can show people why each of your kids has a 50% chance at blue eyes (or whatever results the calulator gives).
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Gene wars: the last-ditch battle over who owns the rights to our DNA

Gene wars: the last-ditch battle over who owns the rights to our DNA | Genetics | Scoop.it
A US biotech company is fighting to protect the patents it took out on a test for a cancer-causing gene.
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Ancient Mummy Gives Up Genetic Secrets

Ancient Mummy Gives Up Genetic Secrets | Genetics | Scoop.it
By Jo MarchantThe ancient Egyptians could soon be getting their genomes sequenced as a matter of routine. That’s the view, at least, of the first researchers to use next-generation techniques to analyse DNA from Egyptian mummies.
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Why predicting the phenotypic effect of mutations is hard « Genomes Unzipped

Why predicting the phenotypic effect of mutations is hard « Genomes Unzipped | Genetics | Scoop.it
@sciandthecity Grt read Difficulties of predicting genetic mutation & designing treatments for genetics-based disease http://t.co/ToB4HLFlDk
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Discovery of Wound-Healing Genes in Flies Could Mitigate Human Skin Ailments

Discovery of Wound-Healing Genes in Flies Could Mitigate Human Skin Ailments | Genetics | Scoop.it
Biologists at UC San Diego have identified eight genes never before suspected to play a role in wound healing that are called into action near the areas where wounds occur.

 

After injury to the animal epidermis, a variety of genes are transcriptionally activated in nearby cells to regenerate the missing cells and facilitate barrier repair. The range and types of diffusible wound signals that are produced by damaged epidermis and function to activate repair genes during epidermal regeneration remains a subject of very active study in many animals. In Drosophila embryos, serine proteases are locally activated around wound sites, and are also required for localized activation of epidermal repair genes. The serine protease trypsin is sufficient to induce a striking global epidermal wound response without inflicting cell death or compromising the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The fly researchers developed a trypsin wounding treatment as an amplification tool to more fully understand the changes in the Drosophila transcriptome that occur after epidermal injury.

 

By comparing these array results with similar results on mammalian skin wounding they were able to see which evolutionarily conserved pathways are activated after epidermal wounding in very diverse animals. This innovative serine protease-mediated wounding protocol allowed the researchers to identify 8 additional genes that are activated in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of puncture wounds, and the functions of many of these genes suggest novel genetic pathways that may control epidermal wound repair. Additionally, these data augments the evidence that clean puncture wounding can mount a powerful innate immune transcriptional response, with different innate immune genes being activated in an interesting variety of ways. These include puncture-induced activation only in epidermal cells in the immediate vicinity of wounds, or in all epidermal cells, or specifically in the fat body, or in multiple tissues.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sydney's insight:

Cool!

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Connor Keesee's curator insight, December 5, 2013 12:36 PM

Would healing & barrier repairing genes found in flies. The genes regenerate missing cells and also repair them. This gene is activated by injury to the epidermis. This discovery was found by biologists at UC San Diego in April.