Byron Bay, The People That Lived Now & Then
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National Regional Profile : Byron Bay

National Regional Profile : Byron Bay | Byron Bay, The People That Lived Now & Then | Scoop.it
Etiosa Paul Okunbor's insight:

 

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is Australia's national statistical agency. The ABS provides key statistics on a wide range of economic, environmental and social issues. This resource, although plain and bland is a great resource to investigate a local areas. The ABS is a primary source of information which can be attained by anyone. Using this information, students can interpret statistical information and draw conclusions about the people of Byron Bay. Although attaining this information doesn't require students to think critically, it is an effective way to begin to build a foundation (local profile) of a local area (in this case Byron Bay) and the way in which generations live. Having the students(in pairs)  interactively finding this information relates to Randolph’s (2007) description, of the importance of active student learning.

 

LEARNING ACTIVITY:

Students can in pairs/small groups find statistics (scaffolded by teacher) using the ABS as a resource. They can then put this information into appropriate types of graphs. Under each graph they can make conclusions of the information and express their understandings of the information in writing. As this task is quiet difficult, it is the responsibility of the teacher to ensure that students are adequately directed, and have sufficient knowledge of graphs to complete this task. Teachers may create a Byron Bay stat book in which students can progress through as a group. This learning activity over laps with the Maths Outcome MA2-18SP – selects appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, compares, interoperates and evaluates data displays, including tables, pictures and column graphs.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Students can potentially be measured on how competent they are at generating graphs, however as the focus in on HSIE, they main measurement of achievement should be on how the student interoperates the information to draw conclusions on how the general people of Byron Bay live.

 

Randolph, J.R. (2007). Meta-analysis of the research on response cards: Effects on test achievement, quiz achievement, participation, and off-task behaviour. Journal of Positive Behaviour Interventions, 9, 113-128.

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Welcome To Country - YouTube

This video was shown at the opening of the annual Byron Bay Bluesfest followed by an onstage performance of a live 'Welcome to Country' ceremony by the Arakwal people of Byron Bay.

'Welcome to Country' is a protocol used in Australia in relation to Aboriginal affairs. A 'Welcome to Country' ceremony is performed by a local Aboriginal person of significance to symbolise the Traditional Owners' giving blessing to an event taking place on the land. It is usually performed by an Elder as the first item in the event. This symbolically welcomes participants and attendees to the land, it can take the form of a speech or a performance.

Etiosa Paul Okunbor's insight:

 

This video created by members of the Arkawal people expresses the local area of Byron bay and the original people that belong to this land/country. It highlights the responsibility the people have to the land, and the responsibility the land has to the people. With spectacular visuals of the land, and native tongue dialogue, this video is great as it shows Byron bay through an indigenous perspective. The video highlights ways in which the people look after the Bundjalung land. And ways in which the Bundjalung land looks after the people.

 

LEARNING ACTIVITY:

This video would be a great method to introduce (welcome) the Arwakwal people of the Bundjalung land. From this video, students can begin to build perceptions/break perceptions.

 

“Before the many changes brought by European settlers, we used to live off the land and the water. It provided us with many foods from plants, bushes and trees. We want our children, grand-children and their grandchildren to know how we once lived and to also be able to use the food from these lands”.

 

Using this text adopted from the Arakwal community website (also listed on my scoopit), students can begin to understand how an older generation lived and interacted with the land.

Teachers could use this video and text as a stimulus of discussion to understand what students may or may not know about these people. From this, teachers could critically form learning experiences suitable for the required level of understanding the class has which is highlight by Reeve (2006, p. 229) as being a way in which teacher can enhance motivation. Simple brain storm or class discussion can motivate students to enquire/what to find out more about this topic setting a great path for further learning.

 

Reeve, J. (2006). Teachers as facilitators: What autonomy‐supportive teachers do and why their students benefit. The Elementary School Journal.

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My-Place-Classroom-Ideas.pdf

Etiosa Paul Okunbor's insight:

 My Place by Nadia Wheatley and Donna Rawlins (Winner of Australia's Book of the Year 1988), is a telling of history told by children on each decade. Starting at 1988 and going back 200 years, we are told the history of Australia by children living in the same local area. Each child shares their family, culture, experiences and what is happening in their world at the labelled time. Generation, by generation we witness the detransformation of the local area, ultimately ending up with an indigenous (the original people of this land) perspective.

This picture book directly relates to the HSIE subtopic of Time, Continuity and Change specifically addressing the outcome CCS2.1 with the indicator “investigates the local area to identify the peoples who originally lived there now”. This picture book is ideal to support students to understand how different generation interacted, communicated and utilised the land for different purposes. Within a modality that is familiar for children (picture book), and the superb illustrations within. This resource makes perfect for a teacher to begin to unravel the concept of generations (how they lived, and how they live now).

This resource provides numerous activities/ideas for teachers to utilise and use within their practice whilst exploring the HSIE outcome CCS2.1. Not only are these ideas creative, well thought up and practical, although they overlap with many different KLA’s including Mathematics, English and Creative Arts.

 

LEANING ACTIVITIES:

I feel these activities should be utilised to their max potential as many really aim to drive students deep into learning. An example of this is getting students to adopt a role/character of one of the children from a decade and get them to think about how they may live (hot seat). Students can use basic information (from "My Place) about their certain era/character such as what clothes they may be wearing, what they eat, how they get food, how they transport…etc. This lesson directly correlates with Rosemary Ross Johnston’s (2010, pp.465) concept of the “key components of literacy, which is to make meaning from texts, and having the ability to express and communicate these ideas through a number of varying skills”.

 

Rosemary, R.J (2010) Language, Literature, literacy and the Australian curriculum: Literacy Fourth edition: Chapter 23
 

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Paradise Lost?

Paradise Lost? | Byron Bay, The People That Lived Now & Then | Scoop.it
To around 800 thousand Aussies every year, Bali is a spectacular tropical getaway. But to some locals it's changed so much over the past thirty years that they barely recognise it. Away from the eyes of tourists the Balinese are having huge problems with rubbish. And big resorts are popping up everywhere. It's got many locals wondering if tourism has gone too far.
Etiosa Paul Okunbor's insight:

 

Although this video is not purely focused on the local area of Byron Bay, it can be used as a great example of key issues facing the people of Byron Bay and the modern day community. Furthermore, a chance (with relation to other resources) to compare the difference (leading to consequences) in ways of living from different generations.

 

Tourism is a key element that has shaped the way in which many of the local people of Byron Bay live today. This is very similar to Bali and is one of the key issues Bali and it's people face today. The problem Bali faces is that many Balinese feel as if the traditional sense of ownership and belonging has been lost, and that tourism has changed the ways of living to a degrading point.

 

In relation to outcome CCS2.1 with the indicator “investigates a local area to identify the peoples who originally lived there and those who live there now”, this video can be used in a number of ways which support the understandings of how the original people connect and use the land, compared to the existing generation. Form this understanding, students can then make conclusions on the consequences of the different generations ways of living.

 

This resource is not only engaging, although provides opportunities for students to recognise the differences of generations of Byron Bay by looking at a comparable land effected by similar issues. This global perspective  can assist students to develop ideas of how/what we can learn from older/traditional generations and the way they lived.

 

LEARNING ACTIVITY:

A teaching idea for this resource is to get students to compare the two destinations (Bali and Byron Bay) focusing on what both areas/lands have in common, and the way in which the original inhabitants utilised, lived, looked after and even communicated with the land. In doing so, students will be investigating how two generations (both with strong traditional history/culture) lived then and now with a global perspective.

Looking at tourism as a

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Arakwal People of Byron Bay - Our Country

Arakwal People of Byron Bay - Our Country | Byron Bay, The People That Lived Now & Then | Scoop.it
Etiosa Paul Okunbor's insight:

 

This website is a resource that links students directly to the culture of the Arakwal (original people of Byron Bay). This website offers numerous ways for people to explore the history, culture, current issues and stories of the Arakwal people. Furthermore, give insight into the ways, behaviours and traditions of how the original generation of Byron Bay area lived.

For a stage 2 year 4 class, this resource is a great way to introduce research skills. This easy to use, friendly/helpful website makes exploring the culture of the Arakwal people enjoyable. Exploring the way in which the aboriginal culture connects with the land can be a difficult concept to grasp, however this website provides teaching/learning resources which support various stages and ages to understand this concept.

“Our relationship with this Country is more than just a place to live. It’s the living, breathing source of all life, our spiritual home and home of our ancestors’ spirits. It’s our duty to look after Country. We look after Country and Country looks after us”.

The site not only gives insight into the spiritual connections shared with the land, however provides activities and learning programs of basic essential ways of living. These include ‘Places of Plenty’, a guide from the Arakwal Aboriginal Cooperation, relating to bush food, traditional and contemporary indigenous food technology, preparation and nutrition. Or ‘Dolphin Dreaming’ which explores Aboriginal culture, language, music, local families and history.

These not programs and activities not only provide and insight to cultural awareness about Arakwal people and country, but provide teachers with great information which can be used to shape and construct lessons.

Additionally this website provides a number of contacts in which further learning can take place. Teachers can use this to organise excursions and even download worksheets and activities for students to complete.

As Ljungdahl (2010) states, “new technologies can be harnessed to exploit pedagogical potential in the classroom”.This is evidence of ways in which students can use this resource to form a firm understanding of the original generation of people living in Byron Bay and compare this to future generations. They can investigate the similarities, differences and results of ways of living in using the information this website provide as a foundation.

 

Ljungdahl, L. (2010) Mulliteracies and Technology. (pp.399-423) In Winch, G., Johnston, R.R.,  March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holiday, M., Literacy Fourth Edition Somerset.V (Ed.)

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