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Breakfasts Around the World


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | general geography | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:33 PM

The transformation of Saudi Arabia's greenery is a smart idea and I can imagine incredibly beneficial.  We always hear about not wanting to be oil dependent on a foreign countries.  What do oil rich countries say?  Well, Saudi Arabia found a solution for not wanting to be dependent on foreign countries for their agricultural needs.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 26, 2014 9:37 PM

From 1987-2012 NASA has been recording some very strange topography from satellite imaging. Green patches have been presenting themselves as a result of deep oil drilling. In search of fossil fuels far below the desert's crust, water reserves have been located. These water reserves are believed to have been trapped from the last Ice Age. It is because of this discovery that these water reserves have been tapped and irrigation has taken place.Irrigation is being used to water fields with a sprinkler system. This process is known as center-pivot irrigation. Although experts do not know how much water could be below the surface, it is estimated it may only be enough to last for 50 years. With this estimation this may only be a temporary aid to this otherwise dry country.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:52 AM

It's amazing to see how Saudi Arabia is able to transform an area once categorized by it's dryness and lack of vegetation is now being Terra-formed into a green area. This shows what huge amounts of money can do, physically alter the earth and landscapes. Because of the massive amounts of oil available to the Saudi's they are able to ship in a more valuable resource, water.

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Global food crisis

Global food crisis | general geography | Scoop.it
Climate change, changing diets and a growing global population has pushed food security to the top of the international agenda.

 

Food problems are fundamentally geographic.  Understanding local economics, agriculture and development all play a critical role in contextualizing place-based shortages.  This interactive media guide highlights where these issues are the most problematic. 


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 12:39 PM

Neo-Malthusian point of view?

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Harvest

Harvest | general geography | Scoop.it
Harvest is a time of plenty, when the season's hard work is rewarded by bounty. Many of the rhythms of our lives are shaped by the gathering of crops, even if most of us now live in cities.

 

This photo essay shows people from around the world harvesting their crops and taking them to the market. Pictured above, farmers who were waiting for customers gathered alongside corn-laden trucks at the market in Lahore, Pakistan earlier this month.

 

Questions to Ponder: What is similar in these images? What is different? How do those similarities and differences shape the geography of a given region?

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, worldwide, comparison, images.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 16, 2012 6:59 PM
The similarities in this photo are the type of people. From my observation, and the fact that corn is being produced and delivered to the markets, I would say these farmers are native Mexicans. These similarities shape the geography of a region, because we are aware of what Mexican culture includes - the land's productionof corn and its indigenous people having the characteristic of a darker shade of skin.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 18, 2012 6:31 PM
How we cultivate crops can reveal a lot about the society we live in. The scale of agricultural production can show us the socio-economics behind who in society does the cultivation and the technological level or resources available to the society that cultivates it. Some of the differences depicted in these harvest pictures tells me that in lower developed societies cultivation can be associated with tradition and rural surroundings while in developed nations it is more industrialized. However the pictures also show the similarities of how agricultural production overlaps into other aspects of society in some nations more than others. Also another similarity I see is that cultivation is still a very social practice and requires the cooperation and coordination of many people.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:17 AM
This is a very inspiring picture. What we see is the product of labor. If men will only cooperate and work together, we will have an abundant world, no famine, no war. In this picture, I still see a lot of people missing. With only a few people working, we see a lot of products. Therefore, if many people will work together, we can expect more products.
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Food shortages could force world into vegetarianism, warn scientists

Food shortages could force world into vegetarianism, warn scientists | general geography | Scoop.it
Water scarcity's effect on food production means radical steps will be needed to feed population expected to reach 9bn by 2050...

 

This article represents a good example of neo-Malthusian ideas concerning population growth and food production.  The recent drought and subsequent food shortage/spike in global food prices has renewed interest in these ideas.


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Charles M's comment, August 27, 2012 11:00 AM
Being a vegetarian is a lifestyle that not many people wish to embrace. People are looked down upon for being a vegetarian. In reality, as a vegetarian the food is incredible and the feeling after you eat food is drastic compared to a meat eater. As a vegetarian you think more abou what you are putting into your mouth, and eventually body.
Lim Jun Heng's curator insight, February 1, 2013 7:46 AM

From this article I can tell that the lack of water is getting more and more out of hand, affecting our food supply. It will not be a surprise for humans to become vegetarians as the lack of meat is apparent. Having a vegetarian diet is the only way for us human to have enough water for our own consumption. , I think it is not that bad to be a vegetarian, after all vegetarian leads a healthier lifestyle compared to people who always eat meat. Vegetables are good for our health after all. This makes me wonder, considering our lack of water and food supply, what will happen if people refuse to co-operate? And continues to waste resources, will we really be the cause of our own extinction? 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:20 AM

Neo-Malthusian thought......

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From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs

From Pets To Plates: Why More People Are Eating Guinea Pigs | general geography | Scoop.it
Guinea pigs are popular pets in the U.S., but in parts of South America, they're a delicacy. Some environmental and humanitarian groups are making a real push to encourage guinea pig farming as an eco-friendly alternative to beef.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2013 10:50 PM

First off, my apologies if you find the image distressing (I have two guinea pigs in my house and I will not be showing this picture to my children). However, the fact that many readers might find this image disturbing but wouldn't think twice about the sight of chicken grilling on the barbeque highlights the cultural taboos surrounding what we consider appropriate food sources.  The tradition has diffused to the United States as more South American immigrants have come to the United States.  While the meat is more environmentally sustainable (less resources are required to raise one pound of guinea pig meat than one pound of beef), many potential costumers are leery to eat something that they consider a pet.


Tags: food, diffusion, sustainability.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:21 PM

I can  see both sides of this, I would never eat a guinea pig because I grew up viewing them as pets. I think people are brought up a certain way and even when they move they take their customs with them.  I have a friend from china and lived there until he was 14 yrs old, he  had told me the city he was from they ate dog and cats. they view it as meat were we think of them as pets. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 2014 10:26 PM

This article is interesting because it is taking into consideration the ecological benefits of eating what we consider unorthodox meats. Raising guinea pigs for food would apparently leave a substantially smaller carbon footprint over a large, high waste producing animal like cows. Culturally, in South America guinea pigs are considered a delicacy, but I can't see culture changing in the United States to the point where we would give up hamburgers for grilled guinea pig.

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What the World Eats

What the World Eats | general geography | Scoop.it
What's on family dinner tables around the globe? Photographs by Peter Menzel from the book "Hungry Planet"

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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This collection of slides does a very good job of showing their very different diets that are present in different areas of the world. While the price of food is obviously going to be different throughout the world, it is very interesting to see he very different types of food that are consumed by different groups of people. In different areas of the world, there is more emphasis on different types of food. In some places for example they may eat a lot of fruit while in others they may eat a lot of beans or bread. The different amounts that these foods are eaten are tied into both the economic and social aspects of these different cultures. This is because in each area, different things are going to be more affordable and available, as well as being more traditionally eaten. There can also be a difference in the percentage of homemade food in a weekly diet in different areas of the world. While some areas will not have any fast food places or restaurants readily available, others will and will often use these locations which will drastically change their diet habits.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:47 PM
These photos are very interesting, in the way it’s interesting to explore someone else’s house the first time you visit. Looking to see the differences in what people around the world eat, but also how much people around the world eat is fascinating. The fact that the family in Chad eat about one quarter of what most families around the world eat is really telling. What a family eats in week reveals a lot about both their culture, their economy, and their geographic location. It’s no surprise that the people in Japan eat a lot of fish, because they’re an island country; and it wasn’t surprising to see so much bread on the table of the Italian family, because bread is such a large part of the Italian culture. What I did find absolutely fascinating is that most of the families had a bottle of Coca-Cola on their table, which just goes to show you how interconnected our global community is.
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Guerrilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map

Guerrilla Cartographers Put Global Food Stats On The Map | general geography | Scoop.it
The mapmakers have amassed some 80 maps for Food: An Atlas, ranging from surplus in Northeast Italy to meat production in Maryland. The goal is to spread information about various food systems so they can be adapted locally.

 

Social media is enhancing digital cooperation to enable some intriguing grass-roots projects such as this one. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, mapping.


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The hunger wars in our future: Heat, drought, rising food costs, and global unrest

The hunger wars in our future: Heat, drought, rising food costs, and global unrest | general geography | Scoop.it
The physical effects of climate change will prove catastrophic. But the social effects -- food riots, state collapse, mass migrations, and conflicts of every sort -- could prove even more disruptiv...

 

This is an inflammatory article from an environmental organization that is speculative in nature (in other words, take it with a grain of salt).  Yet, this type of thinking about the future and thought exercises is worthy of our investigation.  What do you foresee in the future given the current conditions? 


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Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies

Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies | general geography | Scoop.it

The lithosphere (Earth's crust) is a hard, rigid plate on top of a softer molten layer known as the asthenosphere.  Sounds like an Oreo to me!  As a crude analogy that lets you bring food into the classroom, this lesson on plate boundaries sound like a winner.  For an academic article on how to use Oreo's to teach about Earth's crust, see: http://dusk.geo.orst.edu/oceans/Oreo-Cookie.pdf     


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