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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | general geography | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

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What is Geography?


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Kevin Barker's curator insight, December 2, 9:35 AM

Nice primer by a university student addressing the question of 'what is geography?'

Gordon de Snoo's curator insight, December 3, 8:14 PM

More for senior school - but worthwhile for advanced students to see what can be done with Geography.

Mr. Twining's curator insight, December 8, 11:38 AM

A Prezi that explains what the subject of geography is and how its more than just memorizing areas on a map. Geography and geology are central subjects for environmental science so its important to know what geography is and to dismiss any misconceptions. 

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | general geography | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe

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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | general geography | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 6:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 8:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 22, 12:20 PM

I hope the lizard point Geography tests are enough. I have sent you my screenshots for the ones I have taken.

 

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Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth?

Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth? | general geography | Scoop.it

"Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews and Christians call it the Temple Mount." 

 

What happens when various religious groups claim the same territory as their own?


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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 10, 9:08 AM

#Jerusalem

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 14, 11:35 AM

This article and picture points out just how hard it is to “solve” the problems in Israel.  The constant overlapping of buildings on holy sites complicates the issues more than anything political ever could.  Belief is one of the biggest driving forces for conflict in the world and this illustration reminds us of that.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 1:54 PM

In some of the oldest civilizations on earth, religion is the most important aspect of life. There will always be extreme conflicts in these ancient areas all over religion.

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Population Density

Population Density | general geography | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | general geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:16 PM

unit 2

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:16 PM

In megacities, such as Jakarta, urbanization brings about many problems for local residents. The areas are crowded and residents get little to no income. An Australian organization works to help the people of Jakarta by giving them advice,food and helping where necessary. With this help, families are able to keep their spirits higher and hope that their children will live better lives than the ways that they were brought up.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 8:10 PM

Jakarta is the capitol of Indonesia and now has a population of over 28 million. Urbanization is bringing serious problems to Indonesia’s only mega city, such as poor access to clean water and housing, and overpopulation. Some people, including the young woman in this video are living with 16 or more people in one house. It seems the city is not providing enough affordable housing for its residents.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

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Welcome to 'Geography Education'

Welcome to 'Geography Education' | general geography | Scoop.it

Finding Materials: This site is designed for geography students and teachers to find interesting, current supplemental materials.  To search for place-specific posts, browse this interactive map.  To search for thematic posts, see http://geographyeducation.org/thematic/ (organized by the APHG curriculum).  Also you can search for a keyword by clicking on the filter tab above.

 

Staying Connected: You can receive post updates in the way that best fits how you use social media.

Update Notifications: Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+.

              Email: Click 'follow' button at top right of this page.

Sites with Content: Wordpress, Scoop.it.


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SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 2:19 PM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
SRINIVAS KASULLA's comment, August 31, 2013 2:19 PM
Awsome liked the map and would like to contribute ....thanks for such a nice article Peters Energy :)
Thomas C. Thompson's curator insight, August 31, 2013 7:51 PM

Love this Geography Education site! Set up two ways: regionally and thematically so you can find lesson ideas easily.

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Google Earth for Educators: 50 Exciting Ideas for the Classroom | Associate Degree - Facts and Information

Google Earth for Educators: 50 Exciting Ideas for the Classroom | Associate Degree - Facts and Information | general geography | Scoop.it

Find ideas for any age student and a handful of virtual tours that will not only help you instruct your students, but might even teach you something along the way.

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Rising Anti-Immigration Sentiment in the EU

Stratfor Europe Analyst Adriano Bosoni discusses the political implications of the increasing number of migrants from the European Union's periphery to its c...

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:12 AM

This video describes the increase in immigration into EU countries from other EU countries.  The EU agreements on free movement are being challenged in countries that feel rightly or wrongly that the immigrants coming in are a drain on their economies during this difficult economic time.  It is interesting to see how Europe deals with this immigration issue compared to how America deals with its immigration issues.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 10, 4:47 PM
(Europe post 8) Europe's immigration 'crisis' seems to echo many of the causes and effects currently being felt in the U.S.'s own situation. As jobs become scarcer, anti-immigrant sentiments start to gain ground. The introduction of new cultures can create a sense of cultural insecurity. Controversial laws are put into effect to try to gain some control on the situation. Though it does seem like an invasion to those already living there, keep in mind that the immigrants aren't trying to cause such things; rather, they are looking to regain lost ground for themselves. I know there is a wide divide on political views, but in the very least individuals and governments alike should keep an open mind (even if not an open door) to what outsiders are experiencing / what their driving force is.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 7:54 PM

While many talk about tensions regarding immigration they think of the American public's take an immigration while in actuality Europe is having the same problems and if anything tensions are higher than in the States. In Europe the Influx of immigrants primarily from Turkey and the Middle East have brought about a rise in both racial and religious tensions. In America we're somewhat used to cultural melding while in Europe many are used to cultural homogeneity and these foreigners are bringing with them the fear of cultural dilution and the loss of jobs.  

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The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism

The Rights and Wrongs of Slum Tourism | general geography | Scoop.it
Researchers are heading to Dharavi, Mumbai, to study the impact of slum tours on the residents.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:36 PM

I don’t find nothing right about tourist visiting the slum, I feel that the tourist are violating there privacy. They are human being not some historical landmark. If the tourist are not helping this people why are they going? If you are going to visit this places do it because you want to help them, not because you think is interesting their way of living.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 11:57 AM

Moral questions are always fun. Personally I don't think going to see slums is all that exploitative in itself, but I would make a distinction between guided tours that cost money, and self-directed tours though. In a guided tour you are paying money to walk through a community and view what life is like for those people, but in a self-directed tour you are just another person walking down the streets and viewing whatever you stumble upon. There are plenty of tours within neighborhoods of different economic value the world over, but these tours are scrutinized because the people touring are as wealthy, or less wealthy, than the people living there. I don't think that a poor community changes this dynamic in an immoral way, as the perceptions of which group is superior come from the own minds of those who feel uncomfortable with it.

 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:41 AM

This article rises in interesting question.  Are tours of slums exploitive or beneficial to the slum dwellers?  On the one hand the tours could feel like exploitation and the tourist is viewing attractions at a “zoo”, on the other hand it brings people far removed from slum life in contact with it and can change people’s point of view on the slums.  It can be beneficial if the tour guides donate money to the slums or jobs are sought by slum dwellers to become tour guides.  The question is should slums be hidden away from view or opened up to tourists so that they can see the hardships first hand.  I think that this is an issue that is not clearly black or white; there are many shades of gray involved in this issue.

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China's Water Crisis

China's Water Crisis | general geography | Scoop.it
For years, China claimed to hold an estimated 50000 rivers within its borders. Now, more than half of them have abruptly vanished.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 26, 12:04 AM

China is attributing the disappearance of over 50 percent of their country's rivers to inaccurate sources; more effective technologies today give an accurate picture of China's waterways compared to the former data based off of sources from the  1950's.  While it is probably true to some extent that previous numbers were off, there still needs to be much concern for the state of China's current waterways and why waterways that once existed have disappeared.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:48 PM

Cutting corners in safety and cleanliness has caused pollution in the rivers. All the money they saved cutting corners now has to be invested in diverting clean water to northern areas of the country. I hope someday they realize that you cannot do things super cheaply without paying for it in another area.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:41 PM

What has happened to these rivers? Are they purposely being depleted from China? How do they expect to supply water for their residents if they are building things over these used-to-be rivers?

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Breakfasts Around the World


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:03 AM

These pictures are very interesting and makes you think about the kinds of breakfast you saw when growing up. These pictures allow us to see the kinds of food cultivated in these areas of the world and how they interprete the use of each one. The pictures also show us how each place is related. For example, some of the dishes looked alike in that most of the plate was breads. It makes you wonder where that tradition came from. These pictures also let the viewer in on the development or wealth of the country. Some countries only have a piece of bread and a coffee for breakfast, where other places have huge platefuls of all different kinds of food. Does the amount of food you eat for breakfast have to do with how developed your country is? Food seems so simple, but it can lead to many different interpretations for people. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:17 AM

Typically when I think about different cultural foods I think about lunch or dinner rather than breakfast. When I think about Italy I think about meatballs, pasta, pizza, and gelato. When I think about Germany I think about a lot of meats. However what never really comes to mind is breakfast. Breakfast is one of my absolute favorite meals on the day. I love going out to breakfast and getting some eggs, homefries, sausage, and maybe even a grilled blueberry muffin. This summer I traveled to Italy and that was the first time I realized that breakfast is just as different in their Culture as their lunch and dinner. It was interesting how different things were. They had toast and yogurt, but the yogurt didn't taste the same as it does in America.  It is amazing how different each countries breakfast is in comparison to what we are used to. Some things we consider lunch might be served in another countries breakfast meal. For example Deli meats. It is interesting to see how different each culture really is. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:10 AM

Countries each have their own foods that are unique and freshly made by families everyday. They use foods that are frequently grown and found in the area to make their meals. For example china eats a lot of fish because it is part of their culture. Also people of spanish and mexican cultures are known for cooking spicy delcious foods. Food is apart of what creates cultures.

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Why Do Rivers Curve?


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, December 5, 8:56 AM

El agua tiene su ritmo y pulsa al fluir, gira sobre sí misma. Cuando está en su ambiente natural y se le permite fluir y crear el ambiente por el cual fluye, crea los ríos sinuosos y serpenteantes y cuando esto ocurre, allí donde su dirección de giro cambia de dirección—rotación derecha, con el reloj, hacia una rotación izquierda, contra reloj—lo cual ocurre en las rectas, suelta lo que ha estado llevando y cargando en suspensión y esta material sólido se precipita. Asimismo, cuando el agua gira sobre si misma, se enfría, haciéndose más pesada. Es este tipo de movimiento el que hace que los ríos de las planicies serpenteen, más que cualquier otra influencia que haya "suavizado" sus orillas.

 

Water has its own rhythm and pulsates while flowing, it turns over itself when allowed to. When water is in its own natural environment and is allowed to flow and create its own space, it will create the sinuous rivers and when this happens, where its vortex direction changes—rotating clockwise or counterclockwise—it will release the silt and other materials it was carrying in suspension and they will fall to the bottom. Also, as it turns over itself, water cools down, becoming heavier. It is this motion that makes the plain rivers become sinuous, more so than whatever other influence that may have "loosened" its shores.

Sally Egan's curator insight, December 7, 4:27 PM

A very siual form using simple language to explain the meandering of rivers. Applicable to the course work on Hydrosphere.

YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

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50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth

50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth | general geography | Scoop.it

"You’ve no doubt already come across some interesting finds on Google Earth. The post below attempts to compile the most fascinating sites other have stumbled upon browsing Google Earth. From natural formations to human structures, the world is a different place when viewed from above.  If you’re interested in seeing any of the places yourself, I’ve included the coordinates for every image shown below. Just copy and paste into Google Earth/Maps and explore for yourself!"


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Ann Marie Pelosky Poncet's curator insight, February 14, 8:07 AM

IF you don't have time or money to travel, you can do so by following this link.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 14, 10:26 PM

yes amazing geographic tool. I love zeroing in on Africa- so much more than sand and empty spaces.

ruth

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2:09 PM

When first reading this and viewing the images that go along with it; it became clear that someone somewhere in te world was either looking for these or they stumbled across these specfic faces and shapes in the earth that we dont neccesarily get to see everyday. 28. Monkey Face 65.476721, -173.511416 Russia. This Russian Monkey face was very interesting to see and I would have never thought that their would be these types of images captured.  

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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | general geography | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.
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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | general geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:16 PM

unit 2

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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | general geography | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

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World carbon dioxide emissions by country

World carbon dioxide emissions by country | general geography | Scoop.it
Interactive map of carbon dioxide emissions over time

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Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:23 PM

In Indonesia, many areas lack clean water. This makes it hard to keep residents healthy. World Vision Australia works with Indonesian towns to set up pipelines to the clean water sources to transport it to the areas of dirty water. This helps the villages work together and benefit off having clean water to drink and uncontaminated food. This improves life in Indonesia and they are very thankful for it.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

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A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next

A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next | general geography | Scoop.it
Prof. Arnon Sofer sets out the link between drought, Assad’s civil war, and the wider strains in the Middle East; Jordan and Gaza are also in deep trouble, he warns

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 11:25 AM

The article explains how population growth, climate change, drought, and water shortages could have contributed to the rise of war in Syria. This is an interesting interpretation, one which certainly could have been a contributing factor, but not all the Arab Spring can be attributed to water shortages so it is not a direct cause. The water shortages in Syria and a lack of government response certainly could have fanned flames which already existed due to an oppressive regime and regional conflicts. Climate change gets a lot of attention for the potential damage it could do to the environment, but I had not given much thought to the conflicts it could cause between nations and peoples.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:22 PM

Egypt may be the next country to be in deep trouble. With so many militant attacks coming out of Egypt to being with there is no surprise that the Middle East thinks it will be next on the list.

Pamela Hills's curator insight, July 18, 8:37 AM

 A world at war and hot spots are growing with people caught in middle <3

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Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies

Plate Tectonics with Oreo Cookies | general geography | Scoop.it

The lithosphere (Earth's crust) is a hard, rigid plate on top of a softer molten layer known as the asthenosphere.  Sounds like an Oreo to me!  As a crude analogy that lets you bring food into the classroom, this lesson on plate boundaries sound like a winner.  For an academic article on how to use Oreo's to teach about Earth's crust, see: http://dusk.geo.orst.edu/oceans/Oreo-Cookie.pdf     


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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | general geography | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2:31 PM

This is a really cool game! You should play it.

Allison Henley's curator insight, September 10, 2:35 PM

Very addicting even though I'm not that great at it!! haha

Matleena Laakso's curator insight, October 5, 4:55 AM

Tämä on hauska, muutaman kerran on tullut "pelattua".

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China's Water Crisis

China's Water Crisis | general geography | Scoop.it
For years, China claimed to hold an estimated 50000 rivers within its borders. Now, more than half of them have abruptly vanished.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, April 26, 12:04 AM

China is attributing the disappearance of over 50 percent of their country's rivers to inaccurate sources; more effective technologies today give an accurate picture of China's waterways compared to the former data based off of sources from the  1950's.  While it is probably true to some extent that previous numbers were off, there still needs to be much concern for the state of China's current waterways and why waterways that once existed have disappeared.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:48 PM

Cutting corners in safety and cleanliness has caused pollution in the rivers. All the money they saved cutting corners now has to be invested in diverting clean water to northern areas of the country. I hope someday they realize that you cannot do things super cheaply without paying for it in another area.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:41 PM

What has happened to these rivers? Are they purposely being depleted from China? How do they expect to supply water for their residents if they are building things over these used-to-be rivers?

Rescooped by Karen Kesby from Geography Education
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Flags Quiz

Flags Quiz | general geography | Scoop.it

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From symbols and shapes to colours and crests, how familiar are you with the world of flags? Play now and see if you can be the 'star' of this quiz!


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